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stătĭo , ōnis, f. sto,
I.a standing, a standing still.
I. Lit. (so very rare; “not in Cic.): navis, quae manet in statione,remains standing, stands still, does not move, Lucr. 4, 388; so, “manere in statione,id. 4, 396; 5, 478; 5, 518: “in statione locata nubila,id. 6, 193: varas In statione manus et pugnae membra paravi, in a firm posture (for fighting), Ov. M. 9, 34: “numquam id (sidus) stationem facere,stands still, Plin. 2, 17, 15, § 77: “stationes matutinas facere,id. 2, 15, 12, § 59: “solus immobilem stationis gradum retinens,Val. Max. 3, 2, 23: “terrae,Manil. 2, 70.—*
B. Trop., that which is established by custom or prescription, a transl. of the Gr. θεματισμός, Vitr. 1, 2, 5.—
II. Transf., in concr., a place where persons or things stay or abide, a station, post, an abode, residence.
b. Poet., of things, place, position: “pone recompositas in statione comas,in their place, Ov. Am. 1, 7, 68; id. A. A. 3, 434: “permutata rerum statione, Petr. poët. 120, 99: umoris,Pall. 1, 43.—
B. In partic.
1. In milit. lang., a post, station (v. custodiae, vigilia): “cohortes ex statione et praesidio emissae,Caes. B. G. 6, 42: “ii, qui pro portis castrorum in statione erant ... Cohortes quae in stationibus erant, etc.,id. ib. 4, 32; 5, 15; 6, 37; “6, 38: in stationem succedere,to relieve, id. ib. 4, 32: “stationem inire,Tac. A. 13, 35: “relinquere,Verg. A. 9, 222: “deserere,Suet. Aug. 24: “habere,Liv. 35, 29: “quique primi transierant, in statione erant, dum traicerent ceteri,on guard, Curt. 7, 5, 18.—Transf.: suis vicibus capiebant bina (lumina Argi) quietem; “Cetera servabant atque in statione manebant,kept at their posts, Ov. M. 1, 627; 2, 115.—Trop.: “de praesidio et statione vitae decedere,Cic. Sen. 20, 73: “functo longissimā statione mortali,Vell. 2, 131, 2: “imperii statione relictā,Ov. Tr. 2, 219; Vell. 2, 124, 2; Tac. Or. 17; Suet. Claud. 38.—
b. Transf., like our post, watch, guard, for those who are stationed to watch, who stand guard, sentries, sentinels, outposts, pickets: “ut stationes dispositas haberent,Caes. B. G. 5, 16; 7, 69 fin.: “ut minus intentae diurnae stationes ac nocturnae vigiliae essent,Liv. 9, 24, 5; 25, 38, 16; cf. in sing.: “ad stationem Romanam in portā segniter agentem vigilias perveniunt,id. 10, 32, 7: “dispositā statione per ripas Tiberis,Suet. Tib. 72: “crebrae,Caes. B. C. 1, 73: “custodiae stationesque equitum,id. ib. 1, 59: “statione militum assumptā,” i. e. body-guard, lifeguard, Suet. Tib. 24; so, “militum,id. Ner. 21; 34; 47.—
2. Transf., in gen., a station, office, position, in government, etc. (post-class.): “in hac statione, i. e. the imperial office,Spart. Ael. Verr. 4: “statio imperatoria,Lampr. Comm. 1: “Augusta,Capitol. Clod. Alb. 2: regia, Vulc. 7; Capitol. Verr. 8.—
3. Naut. t. t., an anchorage, roadstead, road, bay, inlet (syn. portus), Lentul. ap. Cic. Fam. 12, 15, 2: “quietam nactus stationem,Caes. B. C. 3, 6; 3, 8; 1, 56 fin.; Liv. 10, 2, 6; 28, 6, 9; 31, 33, 3; Verg. G. 4, 421; id. A. 2, 23 al.
4. A place of residence, a post, station of the fiscal officers of a province; also, for the officers themselves, Cod. Th. 12, 6, 19; Cod. Just. 4, 31, 1; 10, 5, 1; Inscr. Orell. 3207; 4107.—
5. A post-station, post-house, Inscr. Murat. 1015; Morcell. Stil. Inscr. Lat. 1, p. 421.—
6. A religious meeting, assembly of the Christians: “die stationis, nocte vigiliae meminerimus,Tert. Or. 29: “stationes in vesperam producere,id. adv. Psych. 1; so id. ib. 10; id. ad Ux. 2, 4.
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