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stătīvus , a, um, adj. sto,
I.standing still, stationary.
I. In gen. (very rare): de stativis aquis, ut sunt lacus et stagna et putea et maria, standing waters, Varr. ap. Non. 217, 2: tarditas, Firm. Math. 1, 2 fin.—Of a light (transl. of Gr. στηριγμός), App. de Mundo, 16, p. 64, 24.—
II. In partic.
A. In milit. lang., of or belonging to posts, stations, or quarters (the predom. signif. of the word): praesidium stativum, appointed post or station = statio, Cic. Phil. 12, 10, 24; Liv. 41, 1, 6; 44, 40, 6: “castra,a stationary camp, a camp where an army halts for a long while, Caes. B. C. 3, 30; 3, 37; Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 12, § 29; Sall. J. 44, 4; Tac. A. 3, 21 fin. al.—Hence, substt.
1. stătīva , ōrum, n., a stationary camp.
(α). Lit., Liv. 1, 57, 4; 29, 34, 3; 31, 33, 6; 37, 37, 1 and 5; Tac. H. 1, 66 al.—*
(β). Transf., of travellers: stativa, a restingplace, stopping-place, quarters: “stativis dies absumuntur,Plin. 6, 23, 26, § 103; Front. Ep. ad M. Caes. 1, 8.—*
2. stătīvae , ārum, f.: “mansiones, deinde stativae, deinde ubi annona esset accipienda,Lampr. Alex. Sev. 45.—
B. In relig. lang.: stativae feriae, fixed or stated feasts (usually statae feriae), Macr. S. 1, 16, § 5.
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