previous next
vĕtustas , ātis, f. id.,
I.old age, age, long existence.
I. Lit.
II. Transf.
A. Long duration, great age: “quae mihi videntur habitura etiam vetustatem,” i.e. will have a long duration, Cic. Att. 14, 9, 2: “scripta vetustatem si modo nostra ferent,Ov. Tr. 5, 9, 8: vinum in vetustatem servare, till it becomes old, acquires age, Cato, R. R. 114, 2: “terebinthi materies fidelis ad vetustatem,Plin. 13, 6, 12, § 54; Quint. 10, 1, 40; Col. 3, 2, 19; Cels. 3, 14: “conjuncti vetustate, officiis, benevolentiā,” i. e. long intimacy, ancient friendship, Cic. Fam. 13, 32, 2; 10, 10, 2; 11, 16, 2; Q. Cic. Pet. Cons. 5, 16.—
B. Hence, posterity, the remote future (conceived as a time when this age will have become ancient): “de me semper omnes gentes loquentur, nulla umquam obmutescet vetustas,Cic. Mil. 35, 98: “si qua fidem tanto est operi latura vetustas,Verg. A. 10, 792 Ladew. and Forbig. ad loc.; cf.: “quis hoc credat, nisi sit pro teste vetustas,Ov. M. 1, 400.—
C. In medic. lang.: “ulcerum,” i. e. inveterate ulcers, Cels. 5, 26, 31; Plin. 21, 19, 74, § 127.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: