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vēna , ae, f. perh. root veh-, to carry, etc.; prop. a pipe, channel; Gr. ὀχετός,
I.a blood-vessel, vein.
I. Lit.
1. In gen.: “venae et arteriae a corde tractae et profectae in corpus omne ducuntur,Cic. N. D. 2, 55, 139: “venam incidere,id. Pis. 34, 83; Cels. 2, 10: “bracchiorum venas interscindere,Tac. A. 15, 35: “abrumpere,id. ib. 15, 59: “abscindere,id. ib. 15, 69: “exsolvere,id. ib. 16, 17; “16, 19: pertundere,Juv. 6, 46: “secare, Suet. Vit. Luc.: ferire,Verg. G. 3, 460: “solvere,Col. 6, 14, 3.—
2. In partic., an artery: “si cui venae sic moventur, is habet febrem,Cic. Fat. 8, 15; Cels. 3, 6: “tentare,to feel the pulse, Suet. Tib. 72 fin.; “for which, tangere,Pers. 3, 107; Sid. Ep. 22: si protinus venae conciderunt, i. e. the pulse has sunk or fallen, Cels. 3, 5; cf.: “venis fugientibus,Ov. P. 3, 1, 69.—
B. Transf., of things that resemble veins.
2. A vein of metals, Cic. N. D. 2, 60, 151; Juv. 9, 31.—
3. The urinary passage, Cels. 4, 1.—
5. A row of trees in a garden, Plin. 17, 11, 15, § 76.—
6. = membrum virile, Mart. 4, 66, 12; 6, 49, 2; 11, 16, 5; Pers. 6, 72.—
II. Trop.
B. The interior, the innate or natural quality or nature of a thing: “periculum residebit et erit inclusum penitus in venis et visceribus rei publicae,Cic. Cat. 1, 13, 31: “(orator) teneat oportet venas cujusque generis, aetatis, ordinis,the innermost feelings, the spring, pulse, id. de Or. 1, 52, 223: si ulla vena paternae disciplinae in nobis viveret, Sev. ap. Spart. Pesc. 3.—
C. For a person's natural bent, genius, disposition, vein (the fig. taken from veins of metal): “ego nec studium sine divite venā, Nec rude quid possit video ingenium,Hor. A. P. 409: “tenuis et angusta ingenii,Quint. 6, 2, 3: “benigna ingenii,Hor. C. 2, 18, 10: “publica (vatis),Juv. 7, 53.
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