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impendĭum (inp- ), ĭi, n. (also
I.fem. DE SVA IMPENDIA, Inscr. Grut. 871, 8; 1070, 6; 62, 8) [impendo], money laid out on any thing, outlay, cost, charge, expense (class.; most freq. in plur.; cf.: sumtus, impensa).
II. In partic.
A. Money paid out for a loan, i. e. interest: “usura quod in sorte accedebat impendium appellatum,Varr. L. L. 5, § 183 Müll.: “faenus et impendium recusare,Cic. Att. 6, 1, 4: “plebes impendiis debilitata,id. Rep. 2, 34.—
B. In abl. impendio.
2. Adv.: impendĭo (inp- ) (at great expense, i. e. as an intensive particle), by a great deal, greatly, very much; cf. impense under impendo (in vulg. lang.).
b. With verbs: impendio infit, Laev. ap. Gell. 19, 7, 10: “cum impendio excusarem, negavit veniam,App. M. 2, p. 122: “commoveri,id. Mag. p. 275.
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hide References (18 total)
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries from this page (18):
    • Cicero, Letters to Atticus, 10.4.9
    • Cicero, Letters to Atticus, 6.1.4
    • Suetonius, Divus Julius, 54
    • Suetonius, Nero, 31
    • Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia, 18.11
    • Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia, 18.38
    • Livy, The History of Rome, Book 7, 21
    • Cicero, De Republica, 2.34
    • Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, Book 1, 10.18
    • Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, Book 6, 3.35
    • Gellius, Noctes Atticae, 11.18.4
    • Gellius, Noctes Atticae, 18.12.2
    • Gellius, Noctes Atticae, 19.13.3
    • Gellius, Noctes Atticae, 19.7.10
    • Statius, Silvae, 3.3
    • Curtius, Historiarum Alexandri Magni, 3.11
    • Curtius, Historiarum Alexandri Magni, 9.4
    • Cicero, Brutus, 4.16
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