previous next

A´SEA

A´SEA ( Ἀσέα: Ἀσεάτης), a town of Arcadia in the district Maenalia, situated near the frontier of Laconia, on the road from Megalopolis to Pallantium and Tegea. Asea took part in the foundation of Megalopolis, to which city most of its inhabitants removed (Paus. 8.27.3, where for Ἰασαία we ought to read Ἀσαία or Ἀσέα); but Asea continued to exist as an independent state, since the Aseatae are mentioned, along with the Megalopolitae, Tegeatae, and Pallantieis, as joining Epaminondas before the battle of Mantineia, B.C. 362. (Xen. Hell. 6.5. 5) At a later time, however, Asea belonged to Megalopolis, as we see from the descriptions of Strabo and Pausanias. The city was in ruins in the time of Pausanias, who mentions its acropolis. In its territory, and at the distance of 5 stadia from the the city, on the road to Pallantium, were the sources of the Alpheius, and near them those of the Eurotas. The two rivers united their streams, and, after flowing in one channel for 20 stadia, disappeared beneath the earth; the Alpheius rising again at Pegae, and the Eurotas at Belemina in Laconia. North of Asea, on the road to Pallantium, and on the summit of Mt. Boreium (Krâvari), was a temple of Athena Soteira and Poseidon, said to have been founded by Odysseus on his return from Troy, and of which the ruins were discovered by Leake and Ross. The remains of Asea are to be seen on the height which rises above the copious spring of water called Frangóvrysi, “Frank-spring,” the sources of the Alpheius. (Strab. pp. 275, 343; Paus. 8.3.4, 8.44.3, 8.54.2; Steph. B. sub voce Leake, Morea, vol. i. p. 84, vol. iii. p. 34, Peloponnesiaca, p. 247; Ross, Reisen im Peloponnes, vol. i. p. 63.)

hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: