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SYNNADA

SYNNADA (Σύνναδα: Eth. Συναδεύς), a town of Phrygia Salutaris, at the extremity of a plain about 60 stadia in length, and covered with olive plantations. It is first noticed during the march of the consul Manlius against the Gallograeci (Liv. 38.15, 45.34); and Cicero (Cic. Att. 5.20; comp. ad Fam. 3.8. 15.4) mentions that he passed through Synnada on his way from Ephesus to Cilicia. In Strabo's time (xii. p. 577) it was still a small town, but when Pliny wrote (5.29) it was an important place, being the conventus juridicus for the whole of the surrounding country. It was very celebrated among the Romans for a beautiful kind of marble furnished by the neighbouring quarries, and which was commonly called Synnadic marble, though it came properly from a place in the neighbourhood, Docimia, whence it was more correctly called Docimites lapis. This marble was of a light colour, interspersed with purple spots and veins. (Strab. l.c.; Plin. Nat. 35.1; Stat. Silv. 1.5. 36; Comp. Steph. B. sub voce Ptol. 5.2.24; Martial, 9.76; Symmach. 2.246.) There still are appearances of extensive quarries between Kosru-Khan and Bulwudun, which Col. Leake (Asia Minor, p. 36) is inclined to identify with those of Synnada or Docimia. Remains of the town of Synnada still exist under the name Eski-kara-hissar about 3 miles to the north-west of these quarries, where they were discovered by Texier. Earlier travellers imagined they had found them at Surmina or Surmeneh, or in the plain of Sandakleh. (Comp. Hamilton, Researches, i. p. 466, 2.177; Journal of the R. Geogr. Society, vii. p. 58, viii. p. 144; Eckhel, Doctr. Num. iii. p. 172; Sestini, Num. Vet. p. 127.)

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