previous next

540. Ἄν is sometimes omitted in relative conditions with the subjunctive in lyric, elegiac, and dramatic poetry, as in Homer; chiefly in general conditions. A few examples occur in Herodotus; and even in Attic prose exceptional cases are occasionally found in the manuscripts. (See 469-471.) E.g. Μέγα τοι κλέος αἰεὶ, ᾧτινι σὸν γέρας ἕσπητ᾽ ἀγλαόν, great always is his glory, whom thy illustrious honour (Olympia) follows. PIND. Ol. viii. 10. So Ol. iii. 11, Nem. ix. 44. Πάντας ἐπαίνημι καὶ φιλέω ἑκὼν ὅστις ἔρδῃ μηδὲν αἰσχρόν. SIMON. v. 20 (but ὃς ἂν μὴ κακὸς in the same ode). See TYRT. xii. 34; SOL. xiii. 9 and 55, SOL. xxvii. 3; SIMON. lviii. 5, lxxxv. 7 (ὄφρα . . . ἔχῃ, but ὅταν in vs. 10).

Γέροντα δ᾽ ὀρθοῦν φλαῦρον, ὃς νέος πέσῃSOPH. O.C. 395. Τῶν δὲ πημονῶν μάλιστα λυποῦσ᾽ αἳ φανῶσ᾽ αὐθαίρετοι. Id. O.T. 1231. So Sept. 257, Eum. 211, Eum. 661, and probably 618 ( μὴ κελεύσῃ, for Mss. κελεύσει, after εἶπον denoting a habit). Τοῖσι γὰρ μήτε ἄστεα μήτε τείχεα ἐκτισμένα, . . . κῶς οὐκ ἂν εἴησαν οὗτοι ἄμαχοι; HDT. iv. 46.So i. 216, HDT. ii. 85, HDT. iv. 66. Ἐπιχώριον ὂν ἡμῖν οὗ μὲν βραχεῖς ἀρκῶσι μὴ πολλοῖς χρῆσθαι, “it being our national habit not to use many words where few suffice.” THUC. iv. 17. (Here οὗ μὲν . . . πολλοῖς make five feet of an iambic trimeter, and the words are probably quoted from some poet. See Classen's note. The sentence continues, πλείοσι δὲ ἐν ἂν καιρὸς , κ.τ.λ.) See also Leg. 737B, οἷς and ὅσοις μετῇ. In SOPH. El. 225, ὄφρα ἔχῃ is particular.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: