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Apollo'nius

*)Apollw/nios), physicians. For a list of the physicians of this name see Fabricius, Bibl. Gr. vol. xiii. p. 74, ed. vet.; Le Clerc, Hist. de la Méd.; Haller, Biblioth. Medic. Pract. vol. i.; Harless, Analecta Historico-Crit. de Archigene Medico et de Apolloniis, &c., Bamberg. 1816, 4to.; Sprengel, Hist. de la Méd.


Apollo'nius

1. 2. APOLLONIUS ANTIOCHENUS (Ἀντιοχεύς), the name of two physicians, father and son, who were born at Antioch, and belonged to the sect of the Empirici. They lived after Serapion of Alexandria and before Menodotus [SERAPION; MENODOTUS], and therefore probably in the first or second century B. C. (Gal. Introd. c. 4. vol. xiv. p. 683.) One of them is very likely the person sometimes called "Apollonius Empiricus ;" the other may perhaps be Apollonius Senior.


Apollo'nius

2. Son of the previous Apollonius.


Apollo'nius

3. APOLLONIUS ARCHISTRATOR (Ἀρχιστράτωρ) is the author of a medical prescription quoted by Andromachus (ap. Gal. De Compos. Medicam. sec. Gen. 5.12, vol. xiii. p. 835), and must therefore have lived in or before the first century after Christ. Nothing is known of the events of his life.


Apollo'nius

4. APOLLONIUS BIBLAS (Βιβλᾶς), lived probably in the second century B. C., and wrote, after Zeno's death, a book in answer to a work which he had composed on the meaning of certain marks (χαρακτῆρες) that are found at the end of some chapters in the third book of the Epidemics of Hippocrates. (Gal. Comm. II. in Hippoer. " Epid. III." § 5, vol. xvii. pt. i. p. 618.) It seems most likely that he is not the same person as Apollonius Empiricus. His name is supposed to be connected with the word Βιβλιακός, and seems to have been given him for being (as we say) a book-worm.


Apollo'nius Citiensis

5. APOLLONIUS CITIENSIS (Κιτιεύς), the oldest commentator on Hippocrates whose works are still extant. He was a native of Citium, in Cyprus (Strabo, 14.6, p. 243, ed. Tauchn.), and studied medicine at Alexandria under Zopyrus (Apollon. Cit. p. 2, ed. Dietz); he is supposed to have lived in the first century B. C.


Works

Περὶ Ἄρθρων (

The only work of his that remains is a short Commentary on Hippocrates, Περὶ Ἄρθρων, De Articulis, in three books. It is dedicated to a king of the name of Ptolemy, who is conjectured to have been a younger brother of Ptolemy Auletes, king of Egypt, who was made king of Cyprus, and who is mentioned several times by Cicero. (Pro Dom. 100.8, 20, Pro Flacc. 100.13, Pro Sext. 100.26.)

Editions

Some portions of this work were published by Cocchi in his Discorso dell' Anatomia, Firenze, 1745, 4to., p. 8, and also in his Graecorum Chirurgici Libri, Florent. 1754, fol. The whole work, however, appeared for the first time in the first volume of Dietz's Scholia in Hippocratem et Galenum, Regim. Pruss. 1834, 8vo.; and an improved edition with a Latin translation was published by Kühn, Lips. 1837, 4to., which, however, was not quite finished at the time of his death.


Further Information

See Kühn, Additam. ad Elenchum Medicorum Veterum a Jo. A. Fabricio, &c. exhibitum, Lips. 1826, 4to., fascic. iii. p. 5; Dietz, Schol. in Hipp. et Gal. vol. i. praef. p. v.; Littré, Oeuvres d' Hippocr. vol. i. Introd. p. 92; Choulant, Handbuch der Bücherkunde für die Aeltere Medicin.


Apollo'nius

6. APOLLONIUS, CLAUDIUS, must have lived in or before the second century after Christ, as one of his antidotes is quoted by Galen. (De Antid. 2.11, vol. xiv. p. 171.) Nothing is known of his life.


Apollo'nius Cyprius

7. APOLLONIUS CYPRIUS (Κύπριος) was the pupil of Olympicus and the tutor to Julianus. He was a native of Cyprus, belonged to the sect of the Methodici, and lived probably in the first century after Christ. Nothing more is known of his history. (Gal. De Meth. Med. 1.7, vol. x. pp. 53, 54.)


Apollo'nius Empiricus

8. APOLLONIUS EMPIRICUS (Ἐμπειρικός), is supposed to be one of the persons called "Apollonius Antiochenus." He lived, according to Celsus (De Med. i. praef. p. 5), after Serapion of Alexandria, and before Heracleides of Tarentumn, and therefore probably in the second century B. C. He belonged to the sect of the Empirici, and wrote a book in answer to Zeno's work on the χαρακτῆρες in Hippocrates, mentioned above. This was answered by Zeno, and it was this second work that drew from Apollonius Biblas his treatise on the subject after Zeno's death. (Gal. Comm. II. in Hipp. " Epid. III." § 5, vol. xvii. pt. i. p. 618.) He is mentioned also by Galen De Meth. Med. 2.7, vol. x. p. 142.


Apollo'nius

9. Apollonius Glaucus must have lived in or before the second century after Christ, as his work "On Internal Diseases" is quoted by Caelius Aurelianus. (De Morb. Chron. 4.8, p. 536.) Nothing is known of his life.


Apollo'nius

10. APOLLONIUS HEROPHILEIUS (Ἡροφίλειος) is supposed to be the same person as Apollonius Mus. He wrote a pharmaceutical work entitled Περὶ Εὐπορίστων, De Facile Parabilibus (Gal. De Compos. Medicam. sec. Loc. 6.9, vol. xii. p. 995), which is very frequently quoted by Galen, and which is probably the work referred to by Oribasius (Eupor. ad Eunap. i. prooem. p. 574), and of which some fragments are quoted in Cramer's Anecd. Graeca Paris. vol. i. p. 395, as still existing in MS. in the Royal Library at Paris. He lived before Andromachus, as that writer quotes him (ap. Gal. De Compos. Medicam. sec. Loc. vol. xiii. pp. 76, 114, 137, 308, 326, 981), and also before Archigenes (Gal. ibid. vol. xii. p. 515); we may therefore conclude that he lived in or before the first century after Christ. He was a follower of Herophilus, and is said by Galen (ibid. p. 510) to have lived for some time at Alexandria. His work, Περὶ Μύρων, On Ointments, is quoted by Athenaeus (xv. p. 688), and he is also mentioned by Caelius Aurelianus. (De Morb. Ac. 2.28, p. 139).


Apollo'nius

11. APOLLONIUS HIPPOCRATICUS (Ἱπποκράτειος), is said by Galen (De Secta Opt. 100.14. vol. i. p. 144; Comment. III. in Hippocr. " De Rat. Vict. in Morb. Ac." 100.38. vol. xv. p. 703) to have been a pupil of Hippocrates II., and must therefore have lived in the fourth century B. C. He is blamed by Erasistratus (ap. Gal. l.c.) for his excessive severity in restricting the quantity of drink allowed to his patients.


Apollo'nius

12. APOLLONIUS MEMPHITES (Μεμφιτης) was born at Memphis in Egypt, and was a follower of Erasistratus. (Gal. Introd. 100.10. vol. xiv. p. 700.) He must therefore have lived about the third century B. C., and is probably the same person who is called "Apollonius Stratonicus."He wrote a work "On the Names of the Parts of the Human Body" (Gal. l.c., and Definit. prooem. vol. xix. p. 347), and is quoted by Erotianus (Gloss. Hipp. p. 86), Galen (De Antid. 2.14, vol. xiv. p. 188), Nicolaus Myrepsus (De Aur. cc. 11, 16. pp. 831, 832), and other ancient writers.


Apollo'nius

13. APOLLONIUS MUS (Μῦς), a follower of Herophilus, of whose life no particulars are known, but who must have lived in the first century B. C., as Strabo mentions him as a contemporary. (14.1, p. 182, ed. Tauchn.) He was a fellow-pupil of Heracleides of Erythrae (ibid.), and composed a long work on the opinions of the sect founded by Herophilus. (Cael. Aurel. De Morb. Acut. 2.13, p. 110; Gal. De Differ. Puls. 4.10, vol. viii. pp. 744, 746.) He also wrote on pharmacy (Cels. De Med. v. praef. p. 81; Pallad. Comm. in Hipp. "Epid. VI.," ap. Dietz, Schol. in Hipp. et Gal. vol. ii. p. 98; Gal. De Antid. 2.7, 8, vol. xiv. pp. 143, 146), and is supposed to be the same person who is sometimes called " Apollonius Herophileius."


Apollo'nius

14. APOLLONIUS OPHIS ( Ὄφις) is said by Erotianus (Gloss. Hipp. p. 8) to have made a compilation from the Glossary of difficult Hippocratic words by Baccheius; he must therefore have lived about the first or second century B. C. He is supposed by some persons to be Apollonius Pergamenus, by others Apollonius Ther.


Apollo'nius

15. APOLLONIUS ORGANICUS (Ὀργανικός) is quoted by Galen (De Compos. Medical. sec. Loc. 5.15, vol. xiii. p. 856), and must therefore have lived in or before the second century after Christ. Nothing is known of his life.


Apollo'nius

16. APOLLONIUS PERGAMENUS (Περγάμηνος).

He was born at Pergamus in Mysia, but his date is very uncertain, since it can only be positively determined that, as he is quoted by Oribasius, he must have lived in or before the fourth century after Christ. (Orib. Eupor. ad Eun. 1.9, p. 578.)


Works

On Scarification

He is probably the author of rather a long extract on Scarification preserved by Oribasius (Med. Coll. 7.19, 20, p. 316).

Editions

This is published by C. F. Matthaei in his Collection of Greek Medical Writers, entitled XXI. Veterum et Clarorum Medicorum Graecorum Varia Opuscula, Mosqu. 1808, 4to., p. 144.


Confusion about his name

He is supposed by some persons to be Apollonius Ophis, or Apollonius Ther.


Apollo'nius

17. Apollonius Pitanaeus was born at Pitanae in Aeolia, and must have lived in or before the first century after Christ, as an absurd and superstitious remedy is attributed to him by Pliny. (H. N. 29.38.)


Apollo'nius

18. APOLLONIUS SENIOR ( Πρεσβύτερος) is quoted by Erotianus (Gloss. Hipp. p. 86), and must therefore have lived in or before the first century after Christ. Some persons suppose him to be one of the physicians called Apollonius Antiochenus.


Apollo'nius

19. APOLLONIUS STRATONICUS ( ἀπὸ Στράτωνος) was probably not the son, but the pupil, of Strato of Beryta: he is very likely the same person as Apollonius Memphites, and may be supposed to have lived about the third century B. C. He was a follower of Erasistratus, and wrote a work on the Pulse, which is quoted by Galen. (De Differ. Puls. 4.17, vol. viii. p. 759.)


Apollo'nius

20. APOLLONIUS TARSENSIS ( Ταρσεύς) was horn at Tarsus in Cilicia, and lived perhaps in the first or second century after Christ. His prescriptions are several times quoted by Galen. (De Compos. Medicam. sec. Gen. 5.13, vol. xiii. p. 843.)


Apollo'nius

21. APOLLONIUS THER ( Θήρπ) is supposed by some persons to be the same as Apollonius Ophis, or Apollonius Pergamenus. As he is quoted by Erotianus (Gloss. Hipp. p. 86), he must have lived in or before the first century after Christ.


Apollo'nius

22. Another physician of this name, who is mentioned by Apuleius (Met. ix. init.) as having been bitten by a mad dog, must (if he ever really existed) have lived in the second century after Christ; and the name occurs in several ancient authors, belonging to one or more physicians, without any distinguishing epithet.

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