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Dercylus

or DERCYLLUS (Δερκύλος, Δέρκυλλος), an Athenian, was one of that embassy of ten, in which Aeschines and Demosthenes were included, and which was sent to Philip to treat on the subject of peace in B. C. 347. In B. C. 346, the same ambassadors appear to have been again deputed to ratify the treaty. (See the Argument prefixed to Dem. de Fals. Leg. p. 336; Aesch. de Fals. Leg. p. 41; Thirwall's Greece, vol. v. p. 356; comp. the decree apud Dem. de Cor. p. 235; Classical Museum, vol. i. p. 145.) Dercylus was also one of the envoys in the third embassy (*ἐπὶ τοὺς Ἀμφικτύονας), which was appointed to convey to Philip, then marching upon Phocis, the complimentary and cordial decree of Philocrates, and to attend the Amphictyonic coullncil that was about to be convened on the affairs of Phocis. When, however, the ambassadors had reached Chalcis in Euboea, they heard of the destruction of the Phocian towns by Philip, and of his having taken part entirely with the Thebans, and Dercylus returned to Athens with the alarming news; but the embassy was still desired to proceed. (Aesch. de Fals. Leg. pp. 40, 46, c. Ctes. p. 65; Dem. de Cor. p. 237, De Fals. Leg. pp. 360, 379.) It is perhaps the same Dercylus whom Plutarch mentions as "general of the country" (τοῦ ἐπὶ τῆς χώρας στρατηγοῦ, in B. C. 318 ). When Nicanor, having been called on to withdraw the Macedonian garrison from Munychia, consented to attend a meeting of the council in the Peiraeeus, Dercylus formed a design to seize him, but he became aware of it in time to escape. Dercylus is also said to have warned Phocion in vain of Nicanor's intention of making himself master of the Peiraeeus. (Plut. Phoc. 32; Nep. Phoc. 2; Droysen, Gescch. der Nachf Alex. p. 223.)

[E.E]

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347 BC (1)
346 BC (1)
318 BC (1)
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