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110. Thus, after six years' fighting, the cause of the Hellenes in Egypt was lost. A few survivors1 of their great army found their way through Libya to Cyrenè; by far the larger number perished. [2] Egypt again became subject to the Persians, although Amyrtaeus, the king in the fens, still held out. He escaped capture owing to the extent of the fens and the bravery of their inhabitants, who are the most warlike of all the Egyptians. [3] Inaros, the king of Libya, the chief author of the revolt, was betrayed and impaled. [4] Fifty additional triremes, which had been sent by the Athenians and their allies to relieve their other forces, in ignorance of what had happened, sailed into the Mendesian mouth of the Nile. But they were at once attacked both from the land and from the sea, and the greater part of them destroyed by the Phoenician fleet, a few ships only escaping. Thus ended the great Egyptian expedition of the Athenians and their allies.

1 Nearly the whole of the expedition to Egypt, including a reinforcement of fifty triremes, is destroyed

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  • Commentary references to this page (14):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Philoctetes, 647
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.22
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 6, 6.6
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.8
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER CXXIX
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER II
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXVI
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.36
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.61
    • Walter Leaf, Commentary on the Iliad (1900), 16.281
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.52
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.36
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.1
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.87
  • Cross-references to this page (11):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE ARTICLE—ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, PREPOSITIONS
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.pos=2.1
    • Harper's, Crux
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), CRUX
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ELBO
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
    • Smith's Bio, Amyrtaeus
    • Smith's Bio, I'naros
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Introduction
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (8):
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