previous next
14. The citizens were persuaded, and brought into the city their children and wives, their household1 goods, and even the wood-work of their houses, which they took down. Their flocks and beasts of burden they conveyed to Euboea and the adjacent islands.

[2] The removal of the inhabitants was painful; for the Athenians had always been accustomed to reside in the country.

1 The citizens, following his advice, gather into the city;

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (E.C. Marchant, 1891)
load focus Greek (1942)
load focus English (Thomas Hobbes, 1843)
load focus English (1910)
hide References (16 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (7):
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.108
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.75
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.128
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.135
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.84
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.4
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.75
  • Cross-references to this page (4):
    • Harper's, Domus
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), DOMUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ATHE´NAE
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (4):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: