previous next
47. Such was the order of the funeral celebrated in this winter, with the end of which ended1 the first year of the Peloponnesian War. [2] As soon as summer returned,2 the Peloponnesian army, comprising as before two-thirds of the force of each confederate state, under the command of the Lacedaemonian king Archidamus, the son of Zeuxidamus, invaded Attica, where they established themselves and ravaged the country. [3] They had not been there many days when the plague broke out at Athens for the first time. A similar disorder is said to have previously smitten many places, particularly Lemnos, but there is no record of such a pestilence occurring elsewhere, or of so great a destruction of human life. For a while physicians, in ignorance of the nature of the disease, sought to apply remedies; [4] but it was in vain, and they themselves were among the first victims, because they oftenest came into contact with it. No human art was of any avail, and as to supplications in temples, enquiries of oracles, and the like, they were utterly useless, and at last men were overpowered by the calamity and gave them all up.

1 B.C. 430.

2 Second invasion of Attica; outbreak of the plague,

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (E.C. Marchant, 1891)
load focus English (Thomas Hobbes, 1843)
load focus Greek (1942)
load focus English (1910)
hide References (42 total)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: