previous next
6. When they had killed their prisoners, they sent a messenger to Athens and gave back1 the dead to the Thebans under a flag of truce; they then took the necessary measures for the security of the city. [2] The news had already reached Athens, and the Athenians had instantly seized any Boeotians who were in Attica, and sent a herald to Plataea bidding them do no violence to the Theban prisoners, but wait for instructions from Athens. The news of their death had not arrived. [3] For the first messenger had gone out when the Thebans entered, and the second when they were just defeated and captured; but of what followed the Athenians knew nothing; they sent the message in ignorance, and the herald, when he arrived, found the prisoners dead. The Athenians next despatched an army to Plataea, and brought in supplies. [4] Then leaving a small force in the place they conveyed away the least serviceable of the citizens, together with the women and children.

1 The Athenians, knowing only of the attempt on the city, bid the Platacans spare their prisoners. Leaning the truth, thy garrison Plataea and remove the women and children.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (E.C. Marchant, 1891)
load focus English (Thomas Hobbes, 1843)
load focus English (1910)
load focus Greek (1942)
hide References (31 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (15):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Trachiniae, 339
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.8
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.26
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.32
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.72
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.11
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.125
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.132
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.18
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.40
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Speech of King Archidamus. Chaps. 80-85.
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.85
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.93
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Introduction
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.31
  • Cross-references to this page (7):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE VERB: VOICES
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE PARTICIPLE
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.2.3
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.5.3
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter VI
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, Qualification of the Subject
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (2):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (7):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: