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67. At the end of the same summer, Aristeus the Corinthian, the Lacedaemonian ambassadors Aneristus,1 Nicolaus, and Stratodemus, Timagoras of Tegea, and Pollis of Argos who had no public mission, were on their way to Asia in the hope of persuading the King to give them money and join in the war. They went first of all to Sitalces son of Teres, in Thrace, wishing if possible to detach him from the Athenians, and induce him to lead an army to the relief of Potidaea, which was still blockaded by Athenian forces; they also wanted him to convey them across the Hellespont on their intended journey to Pharnaces, the son of Pharnabazus, who was to send them on to the King. [2] At the time of their arrival two Athenian envoys, Learchus the son of Callimachus, and Ameiniades the son of Philemon, chanced to be at the court of Sitalces; and they entreated his son Sadocus, who had been made an Athenian citizen2, to deliver the envoys into their hands, that they might not find their way to the King and so injure a city which was in some degree his own. [3] He consented, and, sending a body of men with Learchus and Ameiniades, before they embarked, as they were on their way through Thrace to the vessel in which they were going to cross the Hellespont, seized them; [4] they were then, in accordance with the orders of Sadocus, handed over to the Athenian envoys, who conveyed them to Athens. On the very day of their arrival the Athenians, fearing that Aristeus, whom they considered to be the cause of all their troubles at Potidaea and in Chalcidicè, would do them still further mischief if he escaped, put them all to death without trial and without hearing what they wanted to say; they then threw their bodies down precipices. They considered that they had a right to retaliate on the Lacedaemonians, who had begun by treating in the same way the traders of the Athenians and their allies when they caught their vessels off the coast of Peloponnesus. For at the commencement of the war, all whom the Lacedaemonians captured at sea were treated by them as enemies and indiscriminately slaughtered, whether they were allies of the Athenians or neutrals.

1 Envoys sent from the Peloponnesian cities to the King are detained by Sitalces and given up to the Athenians. They are carried to Athens and put to death.

2 Cp. 2.29 fin.

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  • Commentary references to this page (32):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, 643
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 7.137
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 8.126
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.12
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.2
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.40
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 6, 6.4
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.3
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.50
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    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER L
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.1
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    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.48
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, Chapters 1-24: The tenth year of the war
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.14
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.46
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.48
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.84
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.142
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, The dispute between Corinth and Corcyra. Chaps. 24-55.
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.35
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.42
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.58
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.74
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.76
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.33
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.43
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.63
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.79
  • Cross-references to this page (20):
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (2):
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (1):
    • Thucydides, Histories, 2.29
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (9):
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