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81. The Acarnanians, seeing that a great army had invaded their territory, and that the enemy was1 threatening them by sea as well as by land, did not attempt any united action, but guarded their several districts, an sent to Phormio for aid. He replied that a fleet of the enemy was about to sail from Corinth, and that he could not leave Naupactus unguarded. [2] Meanwhile the Peloponnesians and their allies marched in three divisions towards Stratus, intending to encamp near and try negotiations; if these failed, they would take stronger measures and assault the wall. [3] The Chaonians and the other Barbarians advanced in the centre; on the right wing were the Leucadians, Anactorians, and their auxiliaries; on the left was Cnemus with the Peloponnesians and Ambraciots. The three divisions were a long way apart, and at times not even in sight of one another. [4] The Hellenic troops maintained order on the march and kept a look out, until at length they found a suitable place in which to encamp; the Chaonians, confident in themselves, and having a great military reputation in that part of the country, would not stop to encamp, but they and the other Barbarians rushed on at full speed, hoping to take the place by storm and appropriate to themselves the glory of the action. [5] The Stratians perceiving their approach in time, and thinking that, if they could overcome them before the others arrived, the Hellenic forces would not be so ready to attack them, set ambuscades near the city. When they were quite close, the troops came out of the city and from the ambuscades and fell upon them hand to hand. Whereupon the Chaonians were seized with a panic and many of them perished; [6] the other Barbarians, seeing them give way, no longer stood their ground, but took to flight. Neither of the Hellenic divisions knew of the battle; [7] the Chaonians were far in advance of them, and were thought to have hurried on because they wanted to choose a place for their camp. [8] At length the Barbarians in their flight broke in upon their lines; they received them, and the two divisions uniting during that day remained where they were, the men of Stratus not coming to close quarters with them, because the other Acarnanians had not as yet arrived, but slinging at them from a distance and distressing them greatly. For they could not move a step without their armour. Now the Acarnanians are famous for their skill in slinging.

1 The Acarnanians, being refused aid by Phormio, confine themselves to the defence of their cities. Cnemus marches on Stratus in three divisions. While the Hellenes encamp, the Chaonians, rushing forward, attempt to storm the place, but fall into an ambush and are routed.

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  • Commentary references to this page (15):
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.12
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.33
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.8
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXX
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER LXXVI
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.3
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.3
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.46
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.83
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.99
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.48
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.48
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.33
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.39
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.44
  • Cross-references to this page (7):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE CASES
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.4.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.pos=2.1
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), FUNDA
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PERIOECI
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter VI
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (17):
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