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49. Thus spoke Diodotus, and such were the proposals on either side which most nearly represented1 the opposing parties. In spite of the reaction, there was a struggle between the two opinions; the show of hands was very near, but the motion of Diodotus prevailed. [2] The Athenians instantly despatched another trireme, hoping that, if the second could overtake the first2, which had a start of about twenty-four hours, it might be in time to save the city. [3] The Mytilenaean envoys provided wine and barley for the crew, and promised them great rewards if they arrived first. And such was their energy that they continued rowing whilst they ate their barley, kneaded with wine and oil, and slept and rowed by turns. [4] Fortunately no adverse wind sprang up, and, the first of the two ships sailing in no great hurry on her untoward errand, and the second hastening as I have described, the one did indeed arrive sooner than the other, but not much sooner. Paches had read the decree and was about to put it into execution, when the second appeared and arrested the fate of the city.

So near was Mytilenè to destruction.

1 The motion of Diodotus is just carried. A trireme is despatched, which by great exertions arrives in time to save Mytilenè.

2 Reading δευτέπας.

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