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61. 'We should never have asked to speak, if the Plataeans had briefly answered the question which1 was put to them2, and had not turned upon us and arraigned us while they made a long and irrelevant defence of their own doings, excusing themselves from charges which nobody brought against them, and praising what nobody blamed. We must answer their accusations of us, and look a little closely into their glorification of themselves, that neither our baseness nor their superior reputation may benefit them, and that, before you judge, you may hear the truth both about us and them. [2] Our quarrel with them arose thus:—Some time after our first occupation of Boeotia3 we settled Plataea and other places, out of which we drove a mixed multitude. But the Plataeans refused to acknowledge our leadership according to the original agreement, and, separating themselves from the other Boeotians, deserted the traditions of their ancestors. When force was applied to them they went over to the Athenians, and, assisted by them, did us a great deal of mischief; and we retaliated.

1 We should not have spoken if the Plataeans had not. But you must hear our case as well as theirs. They separated themselves from their own nation and went over to the Athenians.

2 Cp. 1.37 init. 73; 6.82.

3 Cp. 1.12.

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hide References (33 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (18):
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.78
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.22
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.43
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.58
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.60
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.63
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.65
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.67
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.81
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.90
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER LXXXVII
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.102
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.106
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.141
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.2
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Speech of the Corinthian ambassadors. Chaps. 37-43.
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.12
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.18
  • Cross-references to this page (4):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE VERB: VOICES
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), BOEOTARCHES
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PLATAEA
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (3):
    • Thucydides, Histories, 1.12
    • Thucydides, Histories, 1.37
    • Thucydides, Histories, 6.82
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (8):
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