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68. Thus spoke the Thebans. The Lacedaemonian judges thought that no objection could be1 made to their question, whether the Plataeans had done them any service in the war.2 For they pretended to have expected neutrality from them in the times before the war, on the strength of the original treaty concluded with Pausanias after the defeat of the Persians. And just before the siege they had made to them a proposal3 of neutrality in accordance with the terms of the same treaty; but the Plataeans had refused. Considering that they had been wronged by them, after their own fair proposals had released them from the obligations of the treaty, they again brought up the Plataeans one after another, and asked each of them separately, Whether he had done any service to the Lacedaemonians and their allies in the war? When he said No, they took him away and slew him; [2] no one was spared. They put to death not less than two hundred Plataeans, as well as twenty-five Athenians who had shared with them in the siege; [3] and made slaves of the women. For about a year the Thebans gave possession of the city to certain Megarians, who had been driven out by a revolution4, and to any surviving Plataeans who were of their own party; but they afterwards razed the whole place to the very foundations, and built near the precinct of Herè an inn forming a square of two hundred feet; it had two stories, and chambers all round. They used the roofs and the doors of the Plataeans; and of the brass and iron articles of furniture found within the walls they made couches, which they dedicated to Herè; they also built in her honour a stone temple a hundred feet long. The Plataean territory they converted into public land, and let it out for terms of ten years; [4] some of their own citizens occupied it. Throughout the whole affair the severity shown by the Lacedaemonians to the Plataeans was mainly promoted by a desire to gratify the Thebans, who seemed likely to be useful allies to them in the war then just beginning. [5] Such was the fate of Plataea, which5 was overthrown in the ninety-third year after the Plataeans entered into alliance with Athens6.

1 The Plataeans are put to death, and their city razed to the ground.

2 Or, taking ἠξίουν in a different sense, and repeating it before καὶ ὅτε ὕτερον: 'For they had been constantly requesting them, as they said, to remain neutral in the times before the war,... and they had repeated the request when just before the siege they had made to them a proposal, '&c.

3 Or, taking ἠξίουν in a different sense, and repeating it before καὶ ὅτε ὕτερον: 'For they had been constantly requesting them, as they said, to remain neutral in the times before the war,... and they had repeated the request when just before the siege they had made to them a proposal,' &c.

4 Cp. 4.66 init.

5 B.C. 519.

6 Cp. Herod. 6.108

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