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20. 'Now, if ever, is the time of reconciliation for us both, before either has suffered any irremediable1 calamity, which must cause, besides the ordinary antagonism of contending states, a personal and inveterate hatred, and will deprive you of the advantages which we now offer. [2] While the contest is still undecided, while you may acquire reputation and our friendship, and while our disaster can be repaired on tolerable terms, and disgrace averted, let us be reconciled, and choosing peace instead of war ourselves, let us give relief and rest to all the Hellenes. The chief credit of the peace will be yours. Whether we or you drove them into war is uncertain; but to give them peace lies with you, and to you they will be grateful. [3] If you decide for peace, you may assure to yourselves the lasting friendship of the Lacedaemonians freely offered by them, you on your part employing no force but kindness only. [4] Consider the great advantages which such a friendship will yield. If you and we are at one, you may be certain that the rest of Hellas, which is less powerful than we, will pay to both of us the greatest deference.'

1 Reconciliation is still possible; for nothing irreparable has happened. Who began the war is a disputed point, but you will have the credit fending it. Once united, we are the lords of Hellas.

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  • Commentary references to this page (20):
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.7
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 6, 6.4
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.57
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.26
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.28
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.31
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.34
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.89
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.15
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.26
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.31
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.36
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.37
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.121
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.132
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.39
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.7
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.74
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Introduction
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.68
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, PREPOSITIONS
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.5.3
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 5.29
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (16):
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