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63. 'And now, because we know not what this hidden future may bring forth, and because the1 Athenians, who are dangerous enemies, are already at our gates,—having these two valid reasons for alarm, let us acquiesce in our disappointment, deeming that the obstacles2 to the fulfilment of our individual hopes3 are really insuperable. Let us send out of the country the enemies who threaten us, and make peace among ourselves, if possible for ever; but if not, for as long as we can, and let our private enmities bide their time. If you take my advice, rest assured that you will maintain the freedom of your several cities; [2] from which you will go forth your own masters, and recompense, like true men, the good or evil which is done to you. But if you will not believe me, and we are enslaved by others, the punishment of our enemies will be out of the question. Even supposing we succeed in obtaining vengeance to our hearts' content, we may perhaps become the friends of our greatest enemies, we certainly become the enemies of our real friends.

1 Send away the Athenians: even if they punish your enemies, they will make you the enemies of your friends.

2 Or, reading ἕκαστός τι: 'to the accomplishment of those things which each of us in whatever degree was hoping to effect.'

3 Or, reading ἕκαστός τι: 'to the accomplishment of those things which each of us in whatever degree was hoping to effect.'

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load focus English (Thomas Hobbes, 1843)
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