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81. The Chalcidians too desired to have him, for at Sparta he had1 always been considered a man of energy. And on this expedition he proved invaluable to the Lacedaemonians. [2] At the time he gave an impression of justice and moderation in his behaviour to the cities, which induced most of them to revolt, while others were betrayed into his hands. Thus the Lacedaemonians were able to lighten the pressure of war upon Peloponnesus; and when shortly afterwards they desired to negotiate, they had places to give in return for what they sought to recover. And at a later period of the war, after the Sicilian expedition, the honesty and ability of Brasidas which some had experienced, and of which others had heard the fame, mainly attracted the Athenian allies to the Lacedaemonians.2 For he was the first Spartan who had gone out to them, and he proved himself3 to be in every way a good man. [3] Thus he left in their minds a firm conviction that the others would be like him.

1 Justice and moderation of Brasidas remembered afterwards in Hellas.

2 Or, taking πρῶτος closely with δόξας: 'For of all the Spartans who had been sent out, he was the first who proved himself,' &c.

3 Or, taking πρῶτος closely with δόξας: 'For of all the Spartans who had been sent out, he was the first who proved himself,' &c.

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