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35. During this summer the Dictidians took Thyssus, a town of Mount Athos, which was in alliance1 with the Athenians. [2] During the whole summer intercourse continued between the Athenians and Peloponnesians. But almost as soon as the peace was concluded both Athenians and Lacedaemonians began to mistrust one another, because the places mentioned in the treaty were not given up. [3] For the Lacedaemonians, who were to make restitution first, according to the lot, had not surrendered Amphipolis and the other less important places which they held, and had not made their allies in Chalcidicè, nor the Boeotians, nor the Corinthians accept the treaty, but only kept declaring that they would join the Athenians in coercing them if they continued to refuse. They even fixed a time, though they did not commit themselves in writing, within which those who would not come into the treaty were to be declared the enemies of both parties. [4] The Athenians, seeing that nothing was being really done, suspected the Lacedaemonians of dishonesty, and therefore they would not give up Pylos when the Lacedaemonians required it; [5] they even repented that they had restored the prisoners taken at Sphacteria, and resolved to keep the other places until the Lacedaemonians had fulfilled their part of the contract. The Lacedaemonians replied that they had done what they could. They had delivered up the Athenian prisoners who were in their hands, and had withdrawn their soldiers from Chalcidicè; they had neglected nothing which lay within their power. But they could not give up Amphipolis, of which they were not entirely masters; [6] they would however try to bring the Boeotians and Corinthians into the treaty, to get back Panactum, and recover all the Athenian captives who were in the hands of the Boeotians. [7] They still continued to insist on the restoration of Pylos, or at any rate on the withdrawal of the Messenians and Helots, now that the Lacedaemonians had withdrawn their troops from Chalcidicè; the Athenians might, if they liked, garrison the place themselves. After many long conferences held during the summer, they persuaded the Athenians to withdraw the Messenians, Helots, and Lacedaemonian deserters: these the Athenians settled at Cranii in Cephallenia. [8] So during this summer there was peace and intercourse between Athens and Sparta.

1 The Lacedaemonians do not give up Amphipolis he Athenians retain Pylos. They agree however to with draw the Messenians and Helots.

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  • Commentary references to this page (25):
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXIX
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.71
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.14
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.21
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, Character and duration of the time of peace between the first and second war.
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.36
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.36
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.37
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.37
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.39
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.42
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.42
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.50
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.55
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.56
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.56
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.67
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.78
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.82
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.82
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.103
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.137
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.2
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.20
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.50
  • Cross-references to this page (9):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, ADVERBIAL COMPLEX SENTENCES (2193-2487)
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CRA´NII
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PYLUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), THYSSUS
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter II
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter IV
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter VI
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 5.56
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (10):
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