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41. The envoys arrived, and began to confer with the Lacedaemonians respecting the conditions1 on which the peace should be made. [2] The Argives at first demanded that the old quarrel about the border-land of Cynuria, a district which contains the cities of Thyrea and Anthenè and is occupied by the Lacedaemonians, should be referred to the arbitration of some state or person. Of this the Lacedaemonians would not allow a word to be said, but they professed their readiness to renew the treaty on the old terms. The Argives at length induced them to make a fifty years' peace, on the understanding however that either Lacedaemon or Argos, provided that neither city were suffering at the time from war or plague, might challenge the other to fight for the disputed territory, as they had done once before when both sides claimed the victory; but the conquered party was not to be pursued over their own border. [3] The Lacedaemonians at first thought that this proposal was nonsense; however, as they were desirous of having the friendship of Argos on any terms, they assented, and drew up a written treaty. But they desired the envoys, before any of the provisions took effect, to return and lay the matter before the people of Argos; if they agreed, they were to come again at the Hyacinthia and take the oaths. So they departed.

1 They send envoys to Lacedaemon, who, after making foolish stipulation about Cynuria, prepare to conclude a peace with the Lacedaemonians for fifty years.

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  • Commentary references to this page (16):
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 1.60
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 1.82-3
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 8.73
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.4
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.3
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.104
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER CXVIII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XXIV
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.44
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.69
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.89
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.10
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.102
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.28
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.38
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.34
  • Cross-references to this page (8):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.2.3
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.5.2
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PARAPRESBEIA
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ANTHE´NE
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ARGOS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CYNU´RIA
    • Smith's Bio, Othry'ades
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (6):
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