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42. While the Argives were thus engaged, the envoys of the Lacedaemonians—Andromedes, Phaedimus,1 and Antimenidas—who were appointed to receive Panactum and the prisoners from the Boeotians, and give them up to the Athenians, found Panactum already demolished by the Boeotians. They alleged that the Athenians and Boeotians in days of old had quarrelled about the place, and had sworn that neither of them should inhabit it, but both enjoy the use of it. However, Andromedes and his colleagues conveyed the Athenian prisoners who were in the hands of the Boeotians to Athens, and restored them; they further announced the destruction of Panactum,2 maintaining that they were restoring that too3, inasmuch as no enemy of the Athenians could any longer dwell there. Their words raised a violent outcry among the Athenians; they felt that the Lacedaemonians were dealing unfairly with them in two respects: [2] first, there was the demolition of Panactum, which should have been delivered standing; secondly, they were informed of the separate alliance which the Lacedaemonians had made with the Boeotians, notwithstanding their promise that they would join in coercing those who did not accept the peace. They called to mind all their other shortcomings in the fulfilment of the treaty, and conscious that they had been deceived, they answered the envoys roughly, and sent them away.

1 Indignation of the Athenians at the separate alliance and at the demolition of Panactum, which should have been restored intact.

2 Or, 'maintaining that this,' i.e. its destruction, 'was equivalent to its restoration' (καὶ τοῦτο, τὴν καθαίρεσιν, ἀπόδοσιν εἵναι).

3 Or, 'maintaining that this,' i.e. its destruction, 'was equivalent to its restoration' (καὶ τοῦτο, τὴν καθαίρεσιν, ἀπόδοσιν εἵναι).

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  • Commentary references to this page (15):
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER LXXXIII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER LXXXVII
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.18
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.39
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.39
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.44
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.46
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.79
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.87
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.102
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.106
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.29
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.18
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.27
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.31
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), A´TTICA
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Selections from the Attic Orators, 1.63
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (10):
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