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99. Ath. 'We do not consider our really dangerous enemies to be any of the peoples inhabiting1 the mainland who, secure in their freedom, may defer indefinitely any measures of precaution which they take against us, but islanders who, like you, happen to be under no control, and all who may be already irritated by the necessity of submission to our empire—these are our real enemies, for they are the most reckless and most likely to bring themselves as well as us into a danger which they cannot but foresee.'

1 The neutral peoples of the mainland have nothing to fear from us, and therefore we have nothing to fear from them. Our subjects and the free islanders are our danger.

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load focus Notes (Harold North Fowler)
load focus English (Thomas Hobbes, 1843)
load focus English (1910)
load focus Greek (1942)
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