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23. Meanwhile Gylippus, quite early in the morning, while the Athenians in Plemmyrium who had1 gone down to the water-side had their minds occupied by the sea-fight, made a sudden attack upon their forts. He captured the largest of them first, then the two lesser, their garrisons forsaking them when they saw the largest so easily taken. [2] Those who escaped from the fortress first captured, getting into a merchant-vessel and some boats which were moored at Plemmyrium, found their way to the main station of the Athenians, but with difficulty; for they were chased by a swift trireme, the Syracusans at that time having the advantage in the Great Harbour. But when the two lesser fortresses were taken, the Syracusans were already losing the day, and the fugitives got past them with greater ease. [3] For the Syracusan ships which were fighting before the mouth of the harbour, having forced their way through the enemy, entered in disorder, and falling foul of one another gave away the victory to the Athenians, who routed not only these, but also the others by whom they were at first worsted inside the harbour. [4] Eleven Syracusan ships were disabled; the crews in most of them were slain, in three, made prisoners. The Athenians themselves lost three ships. They now drew to land the wrecks of the Syracusan ships, and erecting a trophy on the little island in front of Plemmyrium returned to their own station.

1 In the sea-fight the Syracusans are defeated, but the forts are taken

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hide References (20 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (10):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Electra, 283
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Philoctetes, 1316
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.4
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 6, 6.2
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.50
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.35
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.5
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XI
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.106
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Speech of the Corcyraean ambassadors at Athens. Chaps. 32-36.
  • Cross-references to this page (5):
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter VI
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Selections from the Attic Orators, 4.179
    • Smith's Bio, Gylippus
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (5):
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