previous next
11. When the conflict was over, the conquerors left a sufficient number of ships to watch the1 enemy, and with the remainder they lay to under a little island not far off, where they encamped, and sent to Athens, requesting reinforcements. [2] For on the day after the battle the Corinthians had come to assist the Peloponnesian ships, and the other inhabitants of the country quickly followed them. Foreseeing how great would be the labour of keeping guard on so desolate a spot, the Peloponnesians knew not what to do; they even entertained the idea of burning their ships, but on second thoughts they determined to draw them high up on shore, and to keep guard over them with their landforces stationed near, until some good opportunity of escape should occur. Agis was informed of their condition, and sent Thermon, a Spartan, to them. [3] The first tidings which had reached Sparta were to the effect that the ships had left the Isthmus (the Ephors having told Alcamenes to send a horseman announcing the fact), and immediately they determined to send out the five ships of their own which they had ready, under the command of Chalcideus, who was to be accompanied by Alcibiades. But when they were on the point of departure, a second messenger reported that the other squadron had been chased into Piraeum; and then, disheartened by finding that they had begun the Ionian war with a failure, they determined to give up sending the ships from Laconia, and even to recall some others which had already sailed.

1 The ships are blockaded by the Athenians. Discouragement of the Lacedaemonians, who seem doomed to failure.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Notes (T. G. Tucker, 1892)
load focus English (Thomas Hobbes, 1843)
load focus English (1910)
load focus Greek (1942)
hide References (31 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (16):
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.14
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.21
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.23
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.34
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.40
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.47
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.60
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.86
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.90
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XIX
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.112
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.58
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.143
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.46
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.49
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.71
  • Cross-references to this page (4):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.2
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), E´PHORI
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CORINTHUS
    • Smith's Bio, Cha'lcideus
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Introduction
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (10):
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: