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43. As soon as the Athenians heard the result of the seafight they sailed from Samos to Symè1 with their whole fleet. They did not attack the Peloponnesians at Cnidus, nor the Peloponnesians them; but they carried away the heavy tackle of their own ships which had been left at Symè, and touching at Loryma, a place on the mainland, returned to Samos. [2] The Peloponnesians were now all together at Cnidus, and were making the repairs necessary after the battle, while the Lacedaemonian commissioners conferred with Tissaphernes (who was himself on the spot) as to any matters in his past dealings with them at which they were displeased, and as to the best manner of securing their common interests in the future conduct of the war. Lichas entered into the enquiry with great energy; he took exception to both the treaties; [3] that of Chalcideus and that of Theramenes were equally objectionable. For the King at that time of day to claim power over all the countries which his ancestors had formerly held was monstrous. If either treaty were carried out, the inhabitants of all the islands, of Thessaly, of Locris, and of all Hellas, as far as Boeotia, would again be reduced to slavery; instead of giving the Hellenes freedom, the Lacedaemonians would be imposing upon them the yoke of Persia. [4] So he desired them to conclude some more satisfactory treaty, for he would have nothing to say to these; he did not want to have the fleet maintained upon any such terms. Tissaphernes was indignant, and without settling anything went away in a rage.

1 The Peloponnesians, who are now at Cnidus, confer with Tissaphernes Lichas points out the consequences involved in the two treaties. Tissaphernes goes away in a rage.

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  • Commentary references to this page (15):
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.36
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.44
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.45
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.52
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.52
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.58
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.58
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.61
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.84
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.96
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.107
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.111
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.128
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.68
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.57
  • Cross-references to this page (3):
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (2):
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 8.18
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 8.52
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (6):
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