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[503] were at home, and their presence was not a living force felt constantly by the President at Washington.

I was then living at Bloomington, and met Judge Davis every day. As months elapsed we used to get word from Washington in reference to the condition of things; finally, one day the word came that Lincoln had said, I do not know what I may do when the time comes, but there has never been a day when if I had to act I should not have appointed Browning, Judge Davis, General Orme, and myself held a consultation in my law-office at Bloomington. We decided that the remark was too Lincolnian to be mistaken and no man but he could have put the situation so quaintly. We decided also that the appointment was gone, and sat there glum over the situation. I finally broke the silence, saying in substance, “The appointment is gone and I am going to pack my carpet-sack for Washington.” “No, you are not,” said Davis. “Yes, I am,” was my reply. “Lincoln is being swept off his feet by the influence of these Senators, and I will have the luxury of one more talk with him before he acts.”

I did go home, and two days thereafter, in the morning about seven o'clock--for I knew Mr. Lincoln's habits well — was at the White House and spent most of the forenoon with him. I tried to impress upon him that he had been brought into prominence by the Circuit Court lawyers of the old eighth Circuit, headed by Judge Davis. “If,” I said, “Judge Davis, with his tact and force, had not lived, and all other things had been as they were, I believe you would not now be sitting where you are.” He replied gravely, “Yes, that is so.” “Now it is a common law of mankind,” said I, “that one raised into prominence is expected to recognize the force that lifts him, or, if from a pinch, the force that lets him out. The Czar ”


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