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[22] nature leads him to remark and count the strange birds of the country; and he speaks of the beauty of the mountain sides covered with palms which “toss to and fro in the wind like plumes in a helmet.” This poetical note rings so strangely in the midst of his even, mat. ter-of-fact words that one wonders, did he not hear some one else say it, and adopt it because he thought it good? It was his habit to do this. It is thus that many years later the famous “bottling up” of Butler came to be so described.

Yet, though his heart was not in this war, he shone in its battles. He was in all fights that he could be in, and in several that he need not have been in. For after the capture of Vera Cruz he was appointed regimental quartermaster; and this position puts an officer in charge of the trains, and furnishes him with a valid reason for staying behind with them. Grant never did, however,

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Vera Cruz (Veracruz, Mexico) (1)

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