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[29] army friends came to visit him, for he retained their regard; and, with overalls tucked in his boots, he would dine with them at the Planter's House. Personally lonely, he was also out of sympathy with St. Louis politics; and although the events of the world had at length begun to stir his strong brains, and he had opinions, not only about slavery, but also about the Italian war, and studied maps and newspapers minutely, his comments were received with indulgence; for his audience, looking at the man, could scarcely look for wisdom from him.

There came a time when he walked the streets, seeking employment. So painful was it all that those who knew him preferred to cross the street rather than meet him. Can any one gauge the despair of a man who, little as he studied himself, must have known how far below himself he was living?

In March, 1860, Grant went to weigh

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