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[50] six months. But this military man, at that time, had not suppressed the Boers. Such utterances are, of course, merely the voice of English petulance that our house, when divided against itself, did not fall. United, we were a disagreeable competitor for England. Moreover, the Union's triumph might affect England's getting Southern cotton, it was feared; and in Lord Russell's evasions over the Declaration of Paris, and in the sailing of the Alabama, and in the welcome which London gave Benjamin (of Davis's cabinet) when he came there to live after the war, England's hostile undertone to the Union speaks out plainly. We had friends there: the Prince Consort, and through him the Queen; John Bright and the Manchester men. But the rank and file of the aristocracy were full of virtuous rage at our presuming to be a great nation.

No more than Grant does Jefferson Davis seem to have looked for a grave

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