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[81]

Grant was more pestered than ever now with Jews and other traders. As he wrote Chase on July 21: β€œAny trade whatsoever with the rebellious states is weakening to us. ... It will be made the means of supplying the enemy with what they want.” His sound sense, however, could not wholly prevail against the politicians. One would gladly dwell upon the story of the cotton, historically important, and romantic in detail: how β€” for one example β€” a determined and beautiful lady with her French maid spent some six weeks on board a certain flag-ship, and came triumphant away, bringing all the cotton she wanted and leaving all the reputation she had; but we must go on to Chattanooga.

Again, as in the preceding year, Grant felt that one aggressive blow struck should be followed up by another; and Halleck again rejected the notion. Once more the gathered army

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