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[319] an extent had the cavalry arm become reduced, that when the Confederate general Stuart made his raid into Pennsylvania, on the 11th of October, with two thousand men, penetrating as far as Chambersburg, General McClellan could only mount eight hundred men to follow him. Few civilians have any notion of the number of horses which are required by an army of a hundred thousand men. Indeed, we may go further, and say that few civilians have any distinct notion of what an army of a hundred thousand men is. We repeat the words mechanically, as we repeat the distances of the solar system, without any very definite impressions of numbers and mass in one case, or of space in the other. The following extract from General McClellan's Report will, we presume, be read with some surprise by most of our readers, as well as with interest.

In a letter dated October 14, 1862, the general-in-chief says,--

It is also reported to me that the number of animals with your army in the field is about thirty-one thousand. It is believed that your present proportion of cavalry and of animals is much larger than that of any other of our armies.

What number of animals our other armies had, “says General McClellan,” I am not prepared to say; but military men in European armies have been of the opinion that an army, to be efficient, while carrying on active operations in the field, should have a cavalry force equal in numbers to from one-sixth to one-fourth of the infantry force. My cavalry did not amount to one-twentieth part of the army, and hence the necessity of giving every one of my cavalry-soldiers a serviceable horse.

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