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[216]

Eighty-Sixth New York Infantry--“Steuben Rangers.”

Ward's Brigade — Birney's Division--Third Corps.

(1) Col. Benajah D. Bailey. (3) Col. Jacob H. Lansing.
(2) Col. Benjamin L. Higgins. (4) Col. Nathan H. Vincent.

companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment.
Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total.
Field and Staff 3   3       12
Company A   17 17   9 9 130
  B 1 12 13   14 14 124
  C   16 16   18 18 136
  D 1 6 7   11 11 125
  E   19 19   10 10 131
  F   15 15   8 8 124
  G 2 26 28 1 16 17 139
  H 2 17 19   20 20 133
  I 1 13 14   11 11 139
  K 3 18 21 1 12 13 125
Totals 13 159 172 2 129 131 1,318

172 killed == 13.0 per cent.

Total of killed and wounded, 611; died in Confederate prisons (previously included), 11.

battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W.
Manassas, Va. 23 Cold Harbor, Va. 5
Chancellorsville, Va. 14 Petersburg, Va. (assault 1864) 4
Beverly Ford, Va. 6 Jones House, Va., June 22, 1864 1
Gettysburg, Pa. 20 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 12
Mine Run, Va. 6 Deep Bottom, Va. 1
Wilderness, Va. 16 Boydton Road, Va. 6
Po River, Va. 32 Hatcher's Run, Va. (1865) 1
Spotsylvania, Va. 15 Farmville, Va. 3
North Anna, Va. 3 Place unknown 2
Totopotomoy, Va. 2    

Present, also, at Fredericksburg; Wapping Heights; Kelly's Ford; Strawberry Plains; Poplar Spring Church; White Oak Road; Sailor's Creek; Appomattox.

notes.--Organized in October, 1861, at Elmira, N. Y., from companies recruited principally in Steuben county, with some from Chemung and Onondaga. After leaving Elmira the regiment was stationed at Washington, where it performed guard duty for several months. It took the field in August, 1862,--in Piatt's Brigade — and was engaged at Manassas, where it lost 13 killed, 67 wounded, and 38 missing. At Fredericksburg, then in Whipple's Division, Third Corps, it was slightly engaged, a few men being wounded there; but at Chancellorsville the Eighty-sixth was in the thickest of the fight; in that battle the intrepid Lieutenant-Colonel Chapin was killed, and Major Higgins was seriously wounded. With sally diminished ranks the men marched on the field at Gettysburg, where they again faced the enemy's rifles until one-third of their number had fallen; its loss there was 11 killed, 51 wounded, and 4 missing. The regiment reenlisted, and in January, 1864, went home on the customary veterans' furlough. Having been transferred to the Second Corps, it fought under Hancock in the campaigns of 1864. It sustained itself gallantly in a sharp fight at the Po River, losing 96 men there, and suffering the severest percentage of loss of any regiment in that action. It lost 201 men during the first three weeks of the Wilderness campaign--May 6th to the 25th. Its casualties during the siege of Petersburg were also very large; Lieutenant-Colonel Stafford, a brave and popular officer was killed there. The Eighty-sixth fairly earned its reputation as “the fighting regiment of the Southern Tier.”


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