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Incidents of Guyandotte.--That citizens, in the late “massacre,” fired from their houses upon our men, seems to be well attested — at least from J. W. Hite's, (now prisoner at Columbus;) and our men say that the Scott women fired upon them! E. A. Smith (prisoner) is reported seen in the streets with a revolver, firing on our men. John S. Everett, who lives below the Guyandotte River, on that side, with his guns in his hand, was active in shooting men as they came to the shore in swimming across. Capt. Wm. Turner, an old and respectable citizen of Wayne [54] County, a very candid man apparently, was in the fight, and escaped by mounting his horse and dashing through their lines, but was obliged to abandon his horse at the bank of the river; was for a long time lying in the mud at the water's edge and in the water, with a part of his face out in the shade of a tree, while they were searching for him. He heard them shout across: “John, O John Everett, shoot them d-----d devils coming out of the water there,” and two guns went off. “There's another just out behind the tree there.” “Oh, I've sunk that d-----d Yankee.” Another was shot while crawling in the mud, near where Turner lay concealed in the water, and there was a yell, “I've got one of the d-----d dad's scalps, and a first-rate Enfield rifle.” Turner afterward swam the river, and gives us some of these items:

A reliable citizen of Cabell County reports that he heard the rebels boast, on the return to Barbours-ville, that they had thrown eight or nine wounded men off the bridge into the river.

When the rebel cavalry left Guyandotte, twenty-one secession women, all with their secession aprons on, paraded and cheered the victors.

They captured at Guyandotte, 98 Enfield rifles and 32 horses; but themselves lost in the fight 19 horses.

Of their men, they lost 11 killed, about 18 wounded, 2 of them since dead. Capt. Huddleston, Kanawha Rangers, was the captain killed and buried at Ceredo. The captain of the Rockbridge Rangers was mortally wounded, and in a dying condition on Tuesday night.

On leaving Guyandotte, Col. Jenkins remarked to a reliable citizen there, “We did not make much by coming; the losses are about equal!” He made the same remark again in the hearing of Col. Whaley, before he escaped.

Henry Clay Pate, of Kansas notoriety, was there as a captain, and it was he and his men that captured Col. Whaley.--Ironton Register.

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William Turner (3)
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