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Statement of William B. Walker, company D, Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry.

I hereby certify that I was at Fort Pillow, Tennessee, on the twelfth day of the present month, when it was attacked by the confederates. I saw nothing more than has probably been related by a dozen others, until about the time of the panic and the retreat down the bluff by both white and black Union troops. We were followed closely by the rebels, and shot down, after surrender, as fast as they could find us. One of the rebels, after I had given him up my money, as he had ordered me, fired upon me twice, after I had, surrendered, and while I begged for my life. One ball struck me in the left eye. The rebels had almost ceased firing upon us, when an officer came down and told them to “shoot the last damned one of us,” and “not to take one prisoner.” He said it was the order of the General, (I could not hear the name plainly, but I think it was Chalmers.) Then the slaughter of the prisoners was resumed. I saw some six white and ten colored soldiers thus shot, long after they had surrendered, and while the negroes were on their knees, begging to be spared.

 his 
Williamb.XWALKER.
 mark. 

Witness: William Cleary, Second Lieutenant Company B, Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry.

Mound City, Illinois, April 23, A. D. 1864.
Sworn and subscribed to before me this twenty-fifth day of April, 1864, at Mound City, Illinois.

William Stanley Lieutenant and Assistant Provost-Marshal.
A true copy.

C. B. Smith, Lieutenant and A. D.C.

Statement of Jason Lonan, company B, Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry.

I do hereby certify that I was at Fort Pillow, Tennessee, on the twelfth (12th) of the present month, when it was attacked by the rebels under General A. B. Forrest. I was ordered into the Fort at the commencement of the engagement. We kept up a continual fire on both sides until about one o'clock P. M., when a flag of truce was sent in, and firing ceased. While the flag of truce was being considered, I saw the enemy plundering our evacuated quarters, and moving their forces up in large bodies, getting them in position. We had been driving them all the morning. They were at the same time placing their sharp-shooters in the buildings we had occupied as barracks. The object of the flag of truce not having been agreed to, the firing again commenced. About one hour afterward the enemy charged on our works in overwhelming numbers, and the negro soldiers, being panic-stricken, dropped their arms, and ran down the bluff. The whites also, when they found there was to be no quarter shown, also ran down the bluff. The rebels ran after us, shooting all they came to, both black and white. I also certify that I was myself shot after I had surrendered, and while I had my hands up, and was imploring them to show me mercy. They also shot Sergeant Gwalthney, of my company, while he was within ten feet of me, after he had given up his revolver, and while he had his hands up crying out for mercy. They took his own revolver and shot him with its contents twice through the head, killing him instantly. I also certify that I saw the rebels shoot, in all, six men who had surrendered, and who had their hands up asking quarter. I further certify that I saw the rebels come about on the ensuing morning, the thirteenth day of April, A. D. 1864, and despatch several of the colored soldiers of the Sixth United States heavy artillery, who had survived their wounds received on the previous day.

 his 
JASONXLONAN.
 mark. 

Witness: William Cleary, Second Lieutenant Company B, Thirteenth Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry.

Mound City, Illinois, April 28, 1864.
Sworn and subscribed to before me this twenty-third day of April, 1864, at Mound City, Illinois.

William Stanley, Lieutenant and Assistant Provost-Marshal.
A true copy.

C. B. Smith, Lieutenant and A. D.C.

Statement of Corporal William P. Dickey, company B, Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry.

I do hereby certify that I was at Fort Pillow, Tennessee, on the twelfth day of April, A. D. 1864, when that place was attacked by the rebel General Forrest. I went into the Fort at the commencement of the action. We kept up a continuous fire upon both sides until about one o'clock P. M., when a flag of truce was sent in by the rebels, and while it was being considered, the firing was ordered to cease. I also certify that while this was going on, I plainly saw the enemy consolidating their forces and gaining positions they had been endeavoring to gain without success. At the same time their men were plundering our deserted camp, and stealing goods from the Quartermaster's depot, and from the stores of the merchants of the post. They also, at the same time, put their sharp-shooters into our deserted barracks, whence they had fair view, and were in fair range of our little garrison. The firing recommenced after the flag of truce had retired. About one hour thereafter the rebels stormed our works. They had no sooner obtained the top of our walls when the negroes ran, and the whites, obtaining no quarter, ran after them. The rebels followed closely, shooting down all who came in the way, white and black. I also certify that I was myself shot by a rebel soldier after I had surrendered, and while I had my hands up begging for mercy. I also certify that I saw the rebels shoot down ten men, white soldiers, within ten paces of me, while they had their hands up supplicating quarter. I also certify that I saw twelve negro


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