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[117] duty in the powder division, at a point where the ship was riddled very much, and in the immediate vicinity of the shell-whips, which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells. Brown was also wounded.

James E. Sterling, (coal-heaver,) bravery in remaining at his post when wounded, and passing shell until struck down a second time and completely disabled.

Richard Dennis (Boatswain's Mate,) and Samuel H. Davis displayed much courage, bravery, and coolness, the first in operating the torpedo-catcher, and assisting in working the bowchaser, and the latter in acting as a lookout for torpedoes and other obstructions.

Samuel Todd, (quartermaster,) conspicuous coolness at the commencement.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

James Alden, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. S. Brooklyn, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: The accompanying reports of the boatswain, gunner, and carpenter, of the damages sustained by this ship, and of the ammunition expended during our action of yesterday with the rebel forts and gunboats, and with the ram Tennessee, are respectfully forwarded:

The sailmaker being one of the wounded, is not able to make a report, but the damages in his department are a number of cloths cut in the port head of the fore-topsail, and considerable injury to the hammock cloths fore and aft.

One of the shots mentioned by the carpenter as wounding the rail of the top-gallant forecastle, struck directly under the breast of the bow, and had its force not been nearly spent, as is supposed, by its having previously passed through some of the wood-work of the iron-clad Chickasaw, it must inevitably have disabled the gun.

In the vicinity of number four port on the starboard side, in the space of about eight feet square, five shot or shells passed through the side, and one shell struck the sheet-anchor which was stowed above this port, breaking the shank. The lower fluke is also broken off. The gun was entirely disabled.

Acting Master's Mate Cook and three men were killed, and Lieutenant Blake and six men wounded. A shell which exploded on the berthdeck forward killed or wounded every man at the two shell-whips, and those who were passing shell between them, also carrying away one whip.

Acting Ensign Utter, and his assistant, sailmaker Brayton, rigged another whip and stationed new men to man it, and just as they were recommencing work, a second shell exploded again, clearing away every man, this time including Mr. Brayton among the wounded, and depriving us of the services of an active and very efficient officer.

Mr. Baker, the Paymaster's Clerk, performed very good service in the powder division, taking voluntary charge of the after-shell whip, at which no officer was stationed, owing to our being short of officers. Our chain-cable, ranged up and down the starboard side, saved our boilers from one shot, and the sand-bags upon the berthdeck saved them from one if not two more.

The ship's company behaved remarkably well, so much so as to make it difficult to specify even conspicuous conduct without making a rather large list; but I beg to call your especial attention to the following cases mentioned by the division officers, many of which also fell under my own observation, and to request that you will recommend them for the “medal of honor:”

J. Henry Dennig, (Sergeant of Marines,) Michael Hudson, (Sergeant of Marines,) and William M. Smith and Miles M. Oriatt, (Corporals of Marines,) for conspicuous good conduct at their guns.

Barnett Kenna, (Quartermaster,) and William Halsted, (Coxswain,) coolness, bravery, and skill in working their guns. Their conduct was particularly meritorious.

Joseph Brown, (Quartermaster,) and Joseph Irlane, (seaman,) stationed at the wheel, behaved with great coolness and bravery, sending the other two men who were stationed with them to replace men disabled at the guns.

Edward Price, (Coxswain,) great coolness and bravery under fire; his gun became disabled by the sponge breaking, leaving the head in the gun; he proceeded to clear it by pouring down powder into the vent and blowing the sponge-head out.

Alexander Mack, (Captain of Top,) remarkable coolness and courage, was wounded and sent below, but immediately returned and took charge of his gun; remained until he was again wounded twice and entirely disabled.

William Robinson, (Captain of Top,) activity, zeal, and skill displayed in handling his gun, as well as great courage.

William Nichols, (Quartermaster,) perfect coolness and dexterity in handling his gun; always sure of his aim before he would consent to fire.

Nicholas Irwin, (seaman,) John Cooper, (Coxswain,) John Brown, (Captain of Forecastle,) and John Irwin, (Coxswain,) very conspicuous for bravery, skill, coolness, and activity at their guns.

William Blagden, (ship's cook,) William Madden, (coal-heaver,) James Machon, (boy,) William H. Brown, (landsman,) and James Mifflin, (engineer's cook,) conspicuous for bravery, performing their duty in the powder division, at a point where the ship was riddled very much, and in the immediate vicinity of the shell-whips, which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells.

James E. Sterling, (coal-heaver,) bravery in remaining at his post when wounded, and passing shell until struck down a second time and completely disabled.

Richard Dennis (Boatwain's Mate,) and Samuel H. Davis displayed much courage and coolness, the first in operating the torpedo-catcher, and assisting in working of the bow-chaser, and the latter in acting as a lookout for torpedoes and other obstructions.

Samuel Todd, (Quartermaster,) conspicuous coolness at the commencement.

We have found upon our decks and extracted


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