previous next

Surrender of Fort Powell.


Report of rear-admiral Farragut.

flag-ship Hartford, West Gulf blockading Squadron, Mobile Bay, August 8, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that Fort Powell was evacuated on the night of the fifth instant. The rebels blew up much of the fort, but we took all of the guns, and those of the best quality, a list of which will be forwarded. We took some covered barges also from Fort Powell and Cedar Point, which do us good service as a work-shop. The Fleet Engineer and Fleet Paymaster came in the Stockdale, with iron, etc., for the repairs of our vessel.

On the afternoon of the sixth, the Chickasaw went down and shelled Fort Gaines, and on the morning of the seventh I received a communication from Colonel Anderson, commanding the Fort, offering to surrender to the fleet, asking the best conditions. I immediately sent for General Granger, and in the evening had Colonel Anderson and Major Browne on board, and the agreement was signed by all parties.

At seven A. M., August eighth, Fleet Captain Drayton, on the part of the navy, and Colonel Myer, on the part of the army, proceeded to the Fort to carry out the stipulations of the agreement, and at forty-five minutes past nine, the Fort surrendered, and the Stars and Stripes were hoisted on the staff amid the cheers of the fleet. Inclosed herewith are copies of the letters of Colonel Anderson, and the reply of General Granger and myself, marked Nos. 1 and 2, respectively.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.


Letter from Colonel Anderson to rear-admiral Farragut.

headquarters, Fort Gaines, August 7, 1864.
To Admiral Farragut, Commanding Naval Forces off Dauphin Island:
Feeling my inability to maintain my present position longer than you may see fit to open upon me with the fleet, and feeling also the uselessness of entailing upon ourselves further destruction of life, I have the honor to propose the surrender of Fort Gaines, its garrison, stores, etc.

I trust to your magnanimity for obtaining honorable terms, which I respectfully request that you will transmit to me, and allow me sufficient time to consider them and return an answer.

This communication will be handed to you by Major W. R. Browne.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. D. Anderson, Colonel Commanding.


Joint letter from rear-admiral Farragut and Major-General Granger to Colonel Anderson.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, August 7, 1864.
sir: In accordance with the proposal made in your letter of this morning for the surrender of Fort Gaines, I have to say that, after communicating with General Granger, in command of our forces on Dauphin Island, the only offers we can make are--

First. The unconditional surrender of yourself and the garrison of Fort Gaines, with all of the public property within its limits.

Second. The treatment which is in conformity with the custom of the most civilized nations toward prisoners of war.

Third. Private property, with the exception of arms, will be respected.

This communication will be handed you by Fleet Captain P. Drayton, and Colonel Myer of the U. S. army, who fully understand the views of General Granger and myself.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral. G. Granger, Major-General U. S. Army. Colonel C. D. Anderson, Commanding Fort Gaines.


Attack on the defences of Mobile — detailed report of rear-admiral D. G. Farragut.

U. S. Flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 12, 1864.
sir: I had the honor to forward to the Department, on the evening of the fifth instant, a report of my entree into Mobile Bay on the morning of that day, and which, though brief, contained all the principal facts of the attack.

Notwithstanding the loss of life, particularly [101] on this ship, and the terrible disaster to the Tecumseh, the result of the fight was a glorious victory, and I have reason to feel proud of the officers, seamen, and marines of the squadron under my command, for it has never fallen to the lot of an officer to be thus situated and thus sustained. Regular discipline will bring men to any amount of endurance, but there is a natural fear of hidden dangers, particularly when so awfully destructive of human life as the torpedo, which requires more than discipline to overcome.

Preliminary to a report of the action of the fifth, I desire to call the attention of the Department to the previous steps taken in consultation with Generals Canby and Granger. On the eighth of July I had an interview with these officers on board the Hartford, on the subject of an attack upon Forts Morgan and Gaines, at which it was agreed that General Canby would send all the troops he could spare to cooperate with the fleet. Circumstances soon obliged General Canby to inform me that he could not despatch a sufficient number to invest both forts, and in reply I suggested that Gaines should be the first invested, engaging to have a force in the sound ready to protect the landing of the army on Dauphin Island in the rear of that fort, and I assigned Lieutenant Commander De Krafft, of the Conemaugh, to that duty.

On the first instant General Granger visited me again on the Hartford. In the mean time the Tecumseh had arrived at Pensacola, and Captain Craven had informed me that he would be ready in four days for any service. We therefore fixed upon the fourth of August as the day for the landing of the troops and my entrance into the bay; but owing to delays mentioned in Captain Jenkins's communication to me, the Tecumseh was not ready. General Granger, however, to my mortification, was up to time, and the troops actually landed on Dauphin Island.

As subsequent events proved, the delay turned to our advantage, as the rebels were busily engaged during the fourth in throwing troops and supplies into Fort Gaines, all of which were captured a few days afterward.

The Tecumseh arrived on the evening of the fourth, and every thing being propitious, I proceeded to the attack on the following morning.

As mentioned in my previous despatch, the vessels outside the bar, which were designed to participate in the engagement, were all under way by forty minutes past five in the morning, in the following order, two abreast, and lashed together: Brooklyn, Captain James Alden, with the Octorara, Lieutenant Commander C. H. Green, on the port side; Hartford, Captain Percival Drayton, with the Metacomet, Lieutenant Commander I. E. Jouett; Richmond, Captain T. A. Jenkins, with the Port Royal, Lieutenant Commander B. Gherardi; Lackawanna, Captain J. B. Marchand, with the Seminole, Commander E. Donaldson; Monongahela, Commander J. H. Strong, with the Kennebec, Lieutenant Commander W. P. McCann; Ossipee, Commander W. E. Le Roy, with the Itasca, Lieutenant Commander George Brown; Oneida, Commander I. R. M. Mullany, with the Galena, Lieutenant Commander C. H. Wells. The iron-clads — Tecumseh, Commander T. A. M. Craven; the Manhattan, Commander I. W. A. Nicholson; the Winnebago, Commander T. H. Stevens; and the Chickasaw, Lieutenant Commander G. H. Perkins--were already inside the bar, and had been ordered to take up their positions on the starboard side of the wooden ships, or between them and Fort Morgan, for the double purpose of keeping down the fire from the water-battery and the parapet guns of the fort, as well as to attack the ram Tennessee as soon as the Fort was passed.

It was only at the urgent request of the Captains and commanding officers that I yielded to the Brooklyn being the leading ship of the line, as she had four chase-guns and an ingenious arrangement for picking up torpedoes, and because, in their judgment, the flag-ship ought not to be too much exposed. This I believe to be an error; for apart from the fact that exposure is one of the penalties of rank in the navy, it will always be the aim of the enemy to destroy the flag-ship, and, as will appear in the sequel, such attempt was very persistently made, but Providence did not permit it to be successful.

The attacking fleet steamed steadily up the main ship-channel, the Tecumseh firing the first shot at forty-seven minutes past six o'clock. At six minutes past seven the Fort opened upon us, and was replied to by a gun from the Brooklyn, and immediately after the action became general.

It was soon apparent that there was some difficulty ahead. The Brooklyn, for some cause which I did not then clearly understand, but which has since been explained by Captain Alden in his report, arrested the advance of the whole fleet, while, at the same time, the guns of the Fort were playing with great effect upon that vessel and the Hartford. A moment after I saw the Tecumseh struck by a torpedo, disappear almost instantaneously beneath the waves, carrying with her her gallant commander and nearly all her crew. I determined at once, as I had originally intended, to take the lead, and after ordering the Metacomet to send a boat to save, if possible, any of the perishing crew, I dashed ahead with the Hartford, and the ships followed on, their officers believing that they were going to a noble death with their commander-in-chief.

I steamed through between the buoys, where the torpedoes were supposed to have been sunk. These buoys had been previously examined by my Flag-Lieutenant, I. Crittenden Watson, in several nightly reconnoissances. Though he had not been able to discover the sunken torpedoes, yet we had been assured by refugees, deserters, and others, of their existence, but, believing that from their having been some time in the water, they were probably innocuous, I determined to take the chance of their explosion.

From the moment I turned to the north-west-ward, to clear the middle ground, we were enabled to keep such a broadside fire upon the batteries [102] of Fort Morgan that their guns did us comparatively little injury.

Just after we passed the Fort, which was about ten minutes before eight o'clock, the ram Tennessee dashed out at this ship, as had been expected, and in anticipation of which I had ordered the Monitors on our starboard side. I took no further notice of her than to return her fire.

The rebel gunboats, Morgan, Gaines, and Selma, were ahead, and the latter particularly annoyed us with a raking fire, which our guns could not return. At two minutes after eight o'clock I ordered the Metacomet to cast off and go in pursuit of the Selma. Captain Jouett was after her in a moment, and in an hour's time he had her as a prize. She was commanded by P. N. Murphy, formerly of the United States navy. He was wounded in the wrist, his executive officer, Lieutenant Comstock, and eight of the crew, killed, and seven or eight wounded. Lieutenant Commander Jouett's conduct during the whole affair commands my warmest commendations. The Morgan and Gaines succeeded in escaping under the protection of the guns of Fort Morgan, which would have been prevented had the other gunboats been as prompt in their movements as the Metacomet; the want of pilots, however, I believe, was the principal difficulty. The Gaines was so injured by our fire that she had to be run ashore, where she was subsequently destroyed, but the Morgan escaped to Mobile during the night, though she was chased and fired upon by our cruisers.

Having passed the forts and dispersed the enemy's gunboats, I had ordered most of the vessels to anchor, when I perceived the ram Tennessee standing up for this ship. This was at forty-five minutes past eight. I was not long in comprehending his intentions to be the destruction of the flag-ship. The Monitors and such of the wooden vessels as I thought best adapted for the purpose, were immediately ordered to attack the ram, not only with their guns, but bows on at full speed, and then began one of the fiercest naval combats on record.

The Monongahela, Commander Strong, was the first vessel that struck her, and in doing so carried away his own iron prow, together with the cutwater, without apparently doing her adversary much injury. The Lackawanna, Captain Marchand, was the next vessel to strike her, which she did at full speed; but though her stem was cut and crushed to the plank ends for the distance of three feet above the water-edge, to five feet below, the only perceptible effect on the ram was to give her a heavy list.

The Hartford was the third vessel which struck her, but, as the Tennessee quickly shifted her helm, the blow was a glancing one, and, as she rasped along our side, we poured our whole port broadside of nine-inch solid shot within ten feet of her casemate.

The Monitors worked slowly, but delivered their fire as opportunity offered. The Chickasaw succeeded in getting under her stern, and a fifteen-inch shot from the Manhattan broke through her iron plating and heavy wooden backing, though the missile itself did not enter the vessel.

Immediately after the collision with the flagship, I directed Captain Drayton to bear down for the ram again. He was doing so at full speed when, unfortunately, the Lackawanna run into the Hartford just forward of the mizzenmast, cutting her down to within two feet of the water's edge. We soon got clear again however, and were fast approaching our adversary, when she struck her colors and run up the white flag.

She was at this time sore beset; the Chickasaw was pounding away at her stern, the Ossipee was approaching her at full speed, and the Monongahela, Lackawanna, and this ship were bearing down upon her, determined upon her destruction. Her smoke-stack had been shot away, her steering chains were gone, compelling a resort to her relieving tackles, and several of her port shutters were jammed. Indeed, from the time the Hartford struck her until her surrender she never fired a gun. As the Ossipee, Commander Le Roy, was about to strike her, she hoisted the white flag, and that vessel immediately stopped her engine, though not in time to avoid a glancing blow.

During this contest with the rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee, and which terminated by her surrender at ten o'clock, we lost many more men than from the fire of the batteries of Fort Morgan.

Admiral Buchanan was wounded in the leg; two or three of his men were killed, and five or six wounded. Commander Johnston, formerly of the United States navy, was in command of the Tennessee, and came on board the flag-ship, to surrender his sword and that of Admiral Buchanan. The surgeon, Doctor Conrad, came with him, stated the condition of the Admiral, and wished to know what was to be done with him. Fleet Surgeon Palmer, who was on board the Hartford, during the action, commiserating the sufferings of the wounded, suggested that those of both sides be sent to Pensacola, where they could be properly cared for. I therefore addressed a note to Brigadier-General R. L. Page, commanding Fort Morgan, informing him that Admiral Buchanan and others of the Tennessee had been wounded, and desiring to know whether he would permit one of our vessels, under a flag of truce, to convey them, with or without our wounded, to Pensacola, on the understanding that the vessel should take out none but the wounded, and bring nothing back that she did not take out. This was acceded to by General Page, and the Metacomet proceeded on this mission of humanity.

I inclose herewith the correspondence with that officer, (marked numbers one, two, three, and four.) I forward also the reports (marked numbers five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, and twenty-one) of the commanding officers of the vessels who participated [103]

Diagram A.

[104]

Second order of sailing.

Third order of sailing.

[105] in the action, and who will no doubt call attention to the conduct of such individuals as most distinguished themselves.

As I had an elevated position in the main rigging near the top, I was able to overlook not only the deck of the Hartford, but the other vessels of the fleet. 1 witnessed the terrible effects of the enemy's shot, and the good conduct of the men at their guns, and although no doubt their hearts sickened, as mine did, when their shipmates were struck down beside them, yet there was not a moment's hesitation to lay their comrades aside, and spring again to their deadly work.

Our little consort, the Metacomet, was also under my immediate eye during the whole action up to the moment I ordered her to cast off in pursuit of the Selma. The coolness and promptness of Lieutenant Commander Jouett throughout merit high praise; his whole conduct was worthy of his reputation.

In this connection I must not omit to call the attention of the Department to the conduct of Acting Ensign Henry C. Nields, of the Metacomet, who had charge of the boat sent from that vessel, when the Tecumseh sunk. He took her in under one of the most galling fires I ever saw, and succeeded in rescuing from death ten of her crew, within six hundred yards of the Fort. I would respectfully recommend his advancement. The commanding officers of all the vessels who took part in the action deserve my warmest commendations, not only for the untiring zeal with which they had prepared their ships for the contest, but for their skill and daring in carrying out my orders during the engagement. With the exception of the momentary arrest of the fleet, when the Hartford passed ahead, and to which I have already adverted, the order of battle was preserved, and the ships followed each other in close order past the batteries of Fort Morgan, and in comparative safety too, with the exception of the Oneida. Her boilers were penetrated by a shot from the Fort, which completely disabled her, but her consort, the Galena, firmly fastened to her side, brought her safely through, showing clearly the wisdom of the precaution of carrying the vessels in two abreast. Commander Mullany, who had solicited eagerly to take part in the action, was severely wounded, losing his left arm.

In the encounter with the ram, the commanding officers obeyed with alacrity the order to run her down, and without hesitation exposed their ships to destruction to destroy the enemy.

Our iron-clads, from their slow speed and bad steering, had some difficulty in getting into and maintaining their position in line, as we passed the Fort, and, in the subsequent encounter with the Tennessee, from the same causes were not as effective as could have been desired, but I cannot give too much praise to Lieutenant Commander Perkins, who, though he had orders from the Department to return North, volunteered to take command of the Chickasaw, and did his duty nobly.

The Winnebago was commanded by Commander T. H. Stevens, who volunteered for that position. His vessel steers very badly, and neither of his turrets will work, which compelled him to turn his vessel every time to get a shot, so that he could not fire very often, but he did the best under the circumstances.

The Manhattan appeared to work well, though she moved slowly. Commander Nicholson delivered his fire deliberately, and, as before stated, with one of his fifteen-inch shot broke through the armor of the Tennessee, with its wooden backing, though the shot itself did not enter the vessel. No other shot broke through her armor, though many of her plates were started, and several of her port shutters jammed by the fire from the different ships.

The Hartford, my flag-ship, was commanded by Captain Percival Drayton, who exhibited throughout that coolness and ability for which he has been long known to his brother officers. But I must speak of that officer in a double capacity. He is the Fleet Captain of my squadron, and one of more determined energy, untiring devotion to duty, and zeal for the service, tempered by great calmness, I do not think adorns any navy. I desire to call your attention to this officer, though well aware that in thus speaking of his high qualities, I am only communicating officially to the Department that which it knew full well before. To him, and to my staff, in their respective positions, I am indebted for the detail of my fleet.

Lieutenant I. Crittenden Watson, my Flag-Lieutenant, has been brought to your notice in former despatches. During the action he was on the poop attending to the signals, and performed his duties as might be expected, thoroughly. He is a scion worthy the noble stock he sprang from, and I commend him to your attention.

My Secretary, Mr. McKinley, and Acting Ensign H. H. Brownell, were also on the poop, the latter taking notes of the action, a duty which he performed with coolness and accuracy.

Two other Acting Ensigns of my staff, Mr. Bogart and Mr. Heginbotham, were on duty in the powder division, and, as the reports will show, exhibited zeal and ability. The latter, I regret to add, was severely wounded by a raking shot from the Tennessee, when we collided with that vessel, and died a few hours after. Mr. Heginbotham was a young married man, and has left a widow and one child, whom I commend to the kindness of the Department.

Lieutenant A. R. Yates, of the Augusta, acted as an additional aid to me on board the Hartford, and was very efficient in the transmission of orders. I have given him the command temporarily of the captured steamer Selma.

The last of my staff, and to whom I would call the attention of the Department, is not the least in importance. I mean Pilot Martin Freeman. He has been my great reliance in all difficulties in his line of duty. During the action, he was in the main-top, piloting the ships into [106] the bay. He was cool and brave throughout, never losing his self-possession. This man was captured early in the war in a fine fishing-smack which he owned, and though he protested that he had no interest in the war, and only asked for the privilege of fishing for the fleet, yet his services were too valuable to the captors as a pilot not to be secured. He was appointed a first-class pilot, and has served us with zeal and fidelity, and has lost his vessel, which went to pieces on Ship Island. I commend him to the Department.

It gives me pleasure to refer to several officers who volunteered to take any situation where they might be useful, some of whom were on their way North, either by orders of the Department, or condemned by medical survey. The reports of the different commanders will show how they conducted themselves.

I have already mentioned Lieutenant Commander Perkins of the Chickasaw, and Lieutenant Yates of the Augusta. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant William Hamilton, late commanding officer of the Augusta Dinsmore, had been invalided by medical survey, but he eagerly offered his services on board the iron-clad Chickasaw, having had much experience in our Monitors. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant P. Giraud, another experienced officer in iron-clads, asked to go in on one of these vessels, but as they were all well supplied with officers, I permitted him to go in on the Ossipee, under Commander Le Roy. After the action he was given temporary charge of the ram Tennessee.

Before closing this report, there is one other officer of my squadron of whom I feel bound to speak, Captain T. A. Jenkins, of the Richmond, who was formerly my Chief of Staff, not because of his having held that position, but because he never forgets to do his duty to the Government, and takes now the same interest in the fleet as when he stood in that relation to me. He is also the commanding officer of the Second division of my squadron, and, as such, has shown ability and the most untiring zeal. He carries out the spirit of one of Lord Colling-wood's best sayings: “Not to be afraid of doing too much; those who are, seldom do as much as they ought.” When in Pensacola, he spent days on the bar, placing the buoys in the best positions, was always looking after the interests of the service, and keeping the vessels from being detained one moment longer in port than was necessary. The gallant Craven told me only the night before the action in which he lost his life: “I regret, Admiral, that I have detained you; but had it not been for Captain Jenkins, God knows when I should have been here. When your order came I had not received an ounce of coal.”

I feel that I should not be doing my duty did I not call the attention of the Department to an officer who has performed all his various duties with so much zeal and fidelity.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

I inclose herewith my General Orders, Nos. 10 and 12, (marked twenty-two and twenty-three,) issued before the action, and General Orders Nos. 12 and 13, (marked twenty-four and twenty-five,) issued after the engagement.


Letter from rear-admiral Farragut to Brigadier-General R. L. Page.

flag-ship Hartford, August 5, 1864.
Brigadier-General R. L. Page, Commanding Fort Morgan:
sir: Admiral Buchanan is severely wounded, having lost his leg. There are in addition four or five others of the crew of the Tennessee who require more comfortable quarters than we can give them in the fleet. Will the commanding officer at Fort Morgan permit a vessel to take them to our hospital at Pensacola, with or without our own wounded? The understanding being that the flag of truce vessel takes nothing whatever but the wounded, and brings nothing back that she did not take out, and my honor is given for the above time.

Very respectfully,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.


Letter from Brigadier-General R. L. Page to rear-admiral D. G. Farragut.

headquarters Third brigade, D. G., Fort Morgan, Ala., August 5, 1864.
sir: Your communication of this date is received. I am much obliged for the information regarding Admiral Buchanan.

Your request relative to the wounded of the Tennessee, and also those of your own command, being taken to Pensacola, will be permitted under a flag of truce, and to return on the conditions you propose.

I would be glad if Admiral Buchanan, having lost a leg, be permitted, under parole, to go to Mobile, where he can receive earlier and more prompt attention.

If the latter request is granted, please inform me, and I will have a boat from town to take him up.

Very respectfully,

R. L. Page, Brigadier-General Commanding. Rear-Admiral David G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. Squadron, Mobile Bay.


Letter from rear-admiral Farragut to Brigadier-General R. L. Page.

flag-Suip Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: In reply to your note of this date, I would say that it is altogether out of the question that I should permit Admiral Buchanan to be sent to Mobile, but I will send him to Pensacola, where he will receive the same comforts as our own wounded, which I apprehend are as good as they could be at Mobile.

It was simply as an act of humanity that I made the proposition I did to-day. I would be glad to bury my dead on shore, but if there is any objection to it, they can have a sailor's grave in the deep, honored by the heartfelt sighs of their shipmates.

Very respectfully,



[107]

Letter from Brigadier-General R. L. Page to rear-admiral D. G. Farragut.

Fort Morgan, August 6, 1864.
sir: Your note of the fifth received. There is no objection to your burying your dead on shore. When they arrive near the wharf here, a point will be designated for the burial.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. L. Page, Brigadier-General C. S. A. To Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding U. S. Naval Forces, Mobile Bay


Report of Captain Percival Drayton.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to offer the following report of the part which this vessel took in the action of yesterday:

According to previous arrangement, the Metacomet lashed alongside of us at half-past 4 A. M., and at half-past 5 we got under way, following the Brooklyn, which led the line. After some little delay, which was required to allow of all the vessels getting into position, we moved on in the direction of Fort Morgan, which opened on us at about two miles distance at six minutes past seven. The enemy's fire was at once answered by our bow hundred-pounder rifle, the only gun that could be brought to bear, until about half-past 7, when we commenced firing the broadside guns with great rapidity, which was continued as long as they could be of use. About thirty-five minutes past seven, I heard the cry that a monitor was sinking, and looking on the starboard-bow, saw the turret of the Tecumseh just disappearing under the water, where an instant before I had seen this noble vessel pushing on gallantly in a straight line to attack the enemy's ram Tennessee, which had apparently moved out to give her an opportunity.

As our boats could not be lowered, by your direction, one was sent which was towing astern of the Metacomet, the vessel lashed to us.

The rapidity of our fire, together with the smoke, so completely disordered the enemy's aim, that we passed the Fort with no great injury or loss of life, a shell which came through the side and exploded a little abaft the mainmast, killing and wounding a large portion of number seven gun's crew, being the only one that caused much destruction. As we, however, were getting by the shore batteries, we came directly under the fire of the gunboats Selma, Morgan, and Gaines, and the ram Tennessee, and being only able to direct our fire on one of them at a time, the shots from the others were delivered with great deliberation and consequent effect, a single shot having killed ten and wounded five men at number one and two guns.

The Tennessee also followed us for some distance, throwing an occasional shot, but finding that she did not come up, and we being now a mile ahead of the remainder of the fleet, she turned and ran down to them, not wishing, I suppose, to be entirely cut off from Fort Morgan.

At this time, by your order, the Metacomet was cast off and directed to chase the Selma, which, keeping on our bow, had annoyed us excessively with her three stern guns, which we could not answer, owing to our rifle gun-carriage having been destroyed by a shell.

She was just sheering off as the Metacomet was loosed from us, and being followed into shallow water was overtaken and captured by the latter vessel, after an exciting running fight of an hour.

The other two gunboats, the Morgan and Gaines, also got into shallow water, and not being followed by any of our light-draft vessels, escaped to Fort Morgan, where one was run ashore and afterward burned; and the other, the Morgan, got into Mobile during the night by keeping close in shore.

The fight appearing to be now over, we anchored and made signal to the fleet to do the same, supposing that as the Tennessee had got under Fort Morgan, she would remain there, when a quarter of an hour later it was reported that she had come out and was steering toward us. I could not, however, believe in such temerity at first, but its truth becoming soon evident, by your order, I commenced heaving up the anchor, and should have slipped had it not been for the jamming of a shackle-pin; but the ship was soon under way again, steering for the ram, which we struck with great force, although not on her beam, as she turned toward us as we approached. After striking we dropped close alongside, and delivered our broadside of solid nine-inch shot with thirteen pounds of powder, at a distance of perhaps not more than eight feet from her side, as I believe, however, from subsequent observation, without doing any injury. The ram at the time had only two guns in broadside.

One missed fire several times, as we could distinctly hear; the shell from the other passed through our berth-deck and exploded just inside, killing and wounding a number of men, and the pieces broke through the spar and berthdecks, even going through the launch and into the hold where were the wounded.

We then stood off, and were making another circuit to run into the ram again, when in mid career the Lackawanna struck us a little forward of the mizzenmast, cutting us completely down to within two feet of the water. This caused a detention of perhaps five minutes, but finding that we were not sinking, the ship was, by your order, pointed again for the ram, and we were going for her at full speed, when it was observed that a white flag was flying.

This ended the action, and at ten minutes past ten we had again anchored at about four miles distant from Fort Morgan. I have now only to speak of the officers and crew.

To Lieutenant Commander Kimberly, the executive officer, I am indebted, not only for the fine example of coolness and self-possession which he set to to those around him, but also for the excellent condition to which he had brought every thing belonging to the fighting department of the ship, in consequence of which there was [108] no confusion anywhere, even when, from the terrible slaughter at some of the guns, it might have been looked for.

All did their duty, but I cannot but mention Lieutenants Tyson and Adams, and Ensign Whiting, to whose example and exertions it was in a great measure owing, no doubt, that the great loss at some of the guns was not followed by confusion or delay in repairing damages. Acting Master's Mate Finelli, who took charge of the Third division after Lieutenant Adams was wounded, is spoken of to me very highly. Acting Third Assistant-Engineer McEwan is also strongly noticed in the report of Chief-Engineer Williamson. He lost his right arm while busily employed on the berth-deck, where he was stationed, in assisting and comforting the wounded. He is spoken of by his superiors as most competent to fill the position of Third Assistant-Engineer in the regular service, for which I would beg you to recommend him to the Hon. Secretary of the Navy.

The last shell fired at us — that from the ram — killed my clerk, Ensign W. H. Heginbotham.

Although this was the first time he had been in action, nothing, I am told, could exceed the coolness and zeal with which he performed his duties in the powder division, and I feel his loss most seriously, as his general intelligence and many amiable qualities had made him almost necessary to me.

I must also thank Lieutenant A. R. Yates, a volunteer from the United States steamship Augusta, who acted as an aid both to you and myself, and was to me most useful.

The two after-guns were entirely manned by marines, who, under the direction of Captain Charles Heywood, performed most efficient service.

Thanks to the unremitting supervision of Chief-Engineer Williamson, all had been so thoroughly prepared in his department, that nothing was required of the engines during the day which they could not perfectly perform.

The devoted attention of Fleet-Surgeon Palmer, Surgeon Lansdale, and Assistant-Surgeon Commons to our wounded was beyond praise, and it was owing to their skill and untiring exertions that the large number of desperately wounded were prepared by eight o'clock in the evening for removal to the hospital at Pensacola, for which place they left at daylight on the following morning in the Metacomet, under a flag of truce.

Boatswain Dixon was nearly knocked overboard by a splinter, but absented himself from the deck only long enough to have his wounds dressed, when he returned to his duties.

Acting Master's Mate Henrick, while superintending the passage of powder and shell on the berth-deck, was very seriously wounded by a piece of shell which entirely disabled him at the time, and may, I am afraid, prove very serious. Up to this time his conduct and bearing are spoken of by the commanding officer of the division in the highest praise.

I must also thank Lieutenant Watson, your Flag-Lieutenant, who, besides attending most faithfully to the signals, found time to assist me on several occasions when it was important to give directions in detail about the firing.

Of the crew, I can scarcely say too much. They were most of them persons who had never been in action, and yet I cannot hear of a case where any one attempted to leave his quarters or showed any thing but the sternest determination to fight it out. There might perhaps have been a little excuse had such a disposition been exhibited, when it is considered that a great part of four guns' crews were at different times swept away almost entirely by as many shells. In every case, however, the killed and wounded were quietly removed; the injuries at the guns made good, and in a few moments, except from the traces of blood, nothing could lead one to suppose that any thing out of the ordinary routine had happened.

In conclusion, I request that you will recommend to the Honorable Secretary of the Navy, for the medal of honor, the men whose names accompany this in a separate report. They well deserve the distinction.

Very respectfully,

P. Drayton. Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

With this report I inclose those of the executive officer, the officers of divisions, and of the gunner, carpenter, and sailmaker, and I beg leave to heartily indorse all that is said in them about the officers and men of their respective commands.

I would also beg leave to say that although there was very considerable loss of life in the powder division, thanks to the good arrangements and the example of Ensign Dana, who was in charge of it, there was no confusion.

He was also greatly assisted in the after-part of the division by sailmaker T. C. Herbert, whose example tended much to give confidence to those around him; he is a most deserving officer. The gunner, J. L. Staples, and carpenter, George E. Burcham, also deserve notice for their strict attention to duty.

Very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

P. Drayton. Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. Flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864.
sir: Agreeably to your order, I submit the following reports of the passage of this ship by Forts Morgan and Gaines, and our engagement with the ram Tennessee, iron-clad, and with the gunboats Selma, Gaines, and Morgan.

On the morning of the fifth, called all hands at three A. M., stowed hammocks, and gave the people an early breakfast, hove in to twenty fathoms of chain, and prepared to receive the United States steamer Metacomet alongside. At daylight the Metacomet came on our port side and made fast, our battery on that side having been run in for that purpose. [109]

Hove up our anchor, and at forty minutes past five A. M. stood in to take our position astern of the Brooklyn, which ship was slowly standing in for the bar, followed by the Hartford. Lashed our anchors to the bows, and secured the chains with extra stoppers, beat to quarters, and cleared ship for action. A few minutes after seven o'clock, Fort Morgan opened upon us, and continued firing until the fleet had passed.

We commenced and continued to fire with our starboard hundred-pounder Parrott on the topgallant forecastle, until our starboard broadside could bear, which was not, however, until we got nearly abreast of the Fort, when we opened with our twelve nine-inch guns, loaded with ten-second shell. We now fired rapidly, and as we approached used five-second shell and shrapnel, with fuses cut at two seconds, which had the effect to drive the enemy from their water-batteries and parapet guns whilst we were abreast of the Fort. The Brooklyn now having stopped and commenced backing, the Hartford went ahead and led the fleet until we anchored up the bay.

After passing the Brooklyn, the rebel ram and gunboats paid their individual attention to this ship, taking position ahead and on our starboard bow, and with their heavy guns raking us, we not being able to bring any guns to bear on them, except those mounted on the top-gallant forecastle. We continued, however, to advance, they preserving their position until we got some distance from Fort Morgan, when the rebel ram went back to attack our ships astern. The three gunboats, however, still stuck by us. We had now so altered our course as to bring them to bear on our starboard bow and beam, and opened on them with the starboard broadside; we now were on a footing with them, and delivered our fire with effect on all three, they edging off and increasing their distance, but still keeping up a hot fire, from which we suffered very much. This part of the action had now lasted some thirty minutes, most of the time their fire raking us, cutting down our men at the guns fearfully, and damaging gun-carriages and material, when the Metacomet cast off and pursued. The enemy by this time having been pretty well handled, hauled off, separated, the Gaines and Morgan making for the fort, and the Selma falling a prize to the Metacomet. Our ships now having come up, we steamed up the bay and anchored with fifteen fathoms of chain in three and a quarter fathoms of water, when the ram was seen approaching; hove up our anchor, went to quarters, and stood down for the enemy; endeavored to strike her, but our anchor hanging from the hawse-pipe, sheered us off from the ram, so that the ships passed, the port sides grazing each other; depressed our port guns and fired with thirteen pounds of powder and solid shot. After passing, put our helm hard a starboard, to come around for another butt, the ship, however, making a larger circle in getting around; approached near to our own ships that were bound down for the rebel rain; one of them, the Lackawanna, struck us on the starboard side abaft the main-chains, knocking two of our ports into one, capsized a nine-inch gun, carried away the gig and davits, and starboard M. S. M. backstays, also cutting us down to within two feet of the water. We cleared, and stood down for the ram, which had turned and was running away without a smoke-stack, followed by our ironclads, the Ossipee and other ships. When we were nearly up to the enemy, she hoisted the white flag and surrendered — this ship turned back a short distance and anchored.

The conduct of the crew was splendid, and their enthusiasm was unbounded, notwithstanding the raking fire that we suffered. When men fell, others filled the gaps, until almost two entire crews had been swept away. Nothing could be more noble than the spirit displayed by our wounded and dying, who cheered and smiled in their agony, seemingly contented at the sacrifice of their lives for the victory vouchsafed to their country. Such men are our heroes.

The officers, one and all, did their whole duty, and in a measure to their exertions and example may be attributed the unflinching conduct of those they so well instructed, drilled, and commanded. Conspicuous was Ensign Whiting, who worked the forecastle guns under the most trying circumstances and under the most scathing fire. Mr. Dixon, our boatswain; Wm. McEwan, Acting Assistant Engineer; Mr. Herrick, Acting Master's Mate; Acting Ensigns Bogart and Heginbotham, deserve praise for their coolness and assistance in the powder division, which was at one time a perfect slaughter-house.

Lieutenant Yates, of the U. S. Steamer Augusta, and Acting Ensign Marthow, of the U. S. Steamer Tennessee, who volunteered for the fight, also deserve praise for their very valuable services.

Appended are the reports of the divisional officers, whose mention of particular acts of men under their immediate command will enable you to recommend the men mentioned to notice; also the reports of the several officers in charge of the different departments and of the damages sustained therein.

Very respectfully,

L. A. Kimberly, Lieutenant Commander and Executive Officer. Captain P. Drayton, Commanding U. S. S. Hartford.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I respectfully submit the following report of the conduct of the officers and men in the First division, during the engagement of yesterday.

Acting Ensign W. H. Whiting, in charge of the forecastle guns, deserves special mention for his gallantry in serving and working both one-hundred pounder rifles under the most trying circumstances.

The three captains of guns, Henry Clark, Peter W. Stanley, and Wm. H. Wright, displayed an amount of courage and coolness which I have rarely seen equalled. But the two men of whom I wish particularly to speak are Charles Melville and Thomas Fitzpatrick. A rifle shell burst between the two forward nine-inch guns, killing and wounding fifteen men. Charles Melville was [110] among the wounded, and was taken down with the rest to the Surgeon, but came on deck almost immediately, and although scarcely able to stand, refused to go below, and worked at the gun during the remainder of the action. Thomas Fitzpatrick, Captain of No. 1 gun, was struck several times in the face by splinters, and had his gun disabled by a shell. In a few minutes he had his gun in working order again, with new truck, breeching, side-tackle, etc., his wounded below, the dead clear, and was fighting his gun as before, setting a splendid example to the remainder of his crew. His conduct came particularly under my notice, and during the entire action was distinguished for coolness and bravery.

The First division had thirteen killed and ten wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Herbert B. Tyson, Lieutenant Commanding First Division.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I respectfully submit the following report of the conduct of the Second division during the engagement of yesterday, the fifth, with Fort Morgan and the rebel gunboats and ram Tennessee. But a few moments elapsed after the drum beat to quarters before every man was at his station, the guns cast loose and ready for action. Every man seemed determined to do his duty, which he did faithfully, not a man shrinking. Where all did their duty so well, it is hard to discriminate, still it gives me pleasure to mention a few who were the most conspicuous.

Acting Master's Mate Wm. H. Childs displayed great courage in assisting me in the division; the Captains of the guns, Charles Lake, (Coxswain,) Joseph Perry, (Quartermaster,) James Smith, (Captain mizzen-top,) the Second Captains, James Bennett, (seaman,) Owen Holland, (Second Captain mizzen-top,) and Samuel McFall, (Captain After-Guard) showed an example of coolness, energy, and bravery, which stimulated those less brave than themselves, and reflected credit upon themselves. The loaders and spongers, Beonth Diggings, (ordinary seaman,) Augustus Pauly, (seaman,) Charles Davidson, (Captain Forecastle,) Henry Wright, (ordinary seaman,) and Robert Emerson, (landsman) did nobly, and I am proud to have such men under my command; the Quarter-Gunner David Morrow was killed. The battery constituting the Second division is in perfect order — not a gun injured.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

George Mundy, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Commanding Second Division. Lieutenant Commander L. A. Kimberly, Executive Officer U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1861.
sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the conduct of the officers and men of the Third division during the engagement of yesterday with Fort Morgan, the rebel gunboats, and the ram.

When the drum beat to quarters, every man was at his station instantly, and the guns cleared for action. We were unable to bring our guns to bear until nearly abreast of the Fort. We then fired with ten-inch shell and forty degrees of elevation. The fire was kept up with great rapidity, using five-inch shell and decreasing the elevation as we neared the Fort. When abreast of it two rounds of shrapnel cut for two-inch were fired by us. As we passed ahead of the Brooklyn, two shell struck by No. 7 gun, disabling the crew; but one man escaped uninjured on the right side of that gun. Another shell followed in a few seconds, wounding the captain of No. 7, three men at No. 8, and myself. Four men were killed and nine wounded in all, and by those three shell. The gun-captains behaved splendidly — Forbes, Ingersoll, Pinto. Wm. E. Stanley, shellman of No. 8 gun, continued to pass shell after being wounded, till compelled by loss of blood to go below; he deserves especial mention. Every man did his duty in the most gallant manner. I am proud to have had command of so brave a set of men. Acting Master's Mate J. J. Tinelli I cannot fail to mention. He behaved with great gallantry, encouraging the men by his example, and served the guns of the division with great spirit, against the rebel gunboats and ram, after I was sent below.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

La Rue P. Adams, Lieutenant Commanding Third Division. Lieutenant Commander L. A. Kimberly, Executive Officer Flag-Ship Hartford.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to submit to you a report of the conduct of the officers and men of the Master's division during the engagement yesterday with Fort Morgan, the rebel gunboats, and the ram Tennessee. I have great pleasure in mentioning Acting Master's Mate G. R. Avery, who assisted in covering the ship during the entire action, for the great coolness he displayed in his — a responsible — position. John McFarland, (Captain Forecastle,) James Wood, (Quartermaster,) Joseph Cassier, (seaman,) and James Reddington, (landsman,) deserve especial mention for their marked composure. They were at the wheel, and obeyed every order promptly and correctly. Henry Williams (Boatswain's Mate) served the twelve-pounder howitzer in the maintop with courage and great judgment. I had not the power of witnessing the conduct of the remaining men of this division, namely, those of the signal corps and carpenter's gang, but from the officers commanding those departments I have learned that one and all deserve the greatest praise.

Respectfully submitted,

George B. Glidden, Ensign Commanding Master's Division. Lieutenant Commander L. A. Kimberly, Executive Officer Hartford.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I submit the following report of the conduct of the officers and men of the powder division during the engagement of the fifth.

Acting Ensign Bogart exhibited much coolness and presence of mind. [111]

Acting Master's Mate R. P. Herrick deserves especial mention, for until seriously wounded he performed his duties with great coolness and spirit. Acting Ensign W. H. Heginbotham also deserves special mention for his coolness and bravery. He performed his duties in the most exemplary manner until he received his death-wound.

The few man I had on deck passing powder acted with great coolness, and at no time were there any signs of shrinking or fear. Nelson, (Ship's Cook) John Wallington, (landsman,) and Mellage, (Paymaster's Steward,) deserve special mention.

Seven of the forward part of the division were wounded and three of them killed; most of the wounds were mortal.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Wm. Starr Dana, In Charge of Powder Division. Lieutenant Commander L. A. Kimberly, U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford.

In addition to the above, I would call attention to the conduct of Sailmaker F. C. Herbert, whose conduct and cool courage is spoken of as most remarkable.

P. Drayton, Captain.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: The conduct of the officers and men belonging to the Engineer's Department was characterized by coolness and energy during the engagement of yesterday. Their duties were performed as if nothing extraordinary was going on.

Acting Third Assistant-Engineer William G. McEwan deserves special mention for the prompt and efficient manner in which he attended to getting the wounded below, near his station at the berth-deck hose, and he continued to do so until near the close of the action, when he lost his right arm.

The following men deserve to be noticed:

Thomas Walkley, (First C. F.,) for his coolness and attention to duties, although frequently covered with splinters.

James R. Garrison (C. H.) had his great toe shot off, but dressed his wound himself and then returned to his station, where he remained until badly wounded in the chest.

Thomas O'Connell was sick and hardly able to work, but went to his station and remained until his right hand was shot away.

William Caffrey (Second C. F.) and Joseph Fallen (Second C. F.) were inclined to skulk, and required to be compelled to assist the wounded.

The loss in the Engineer's Department was three men killed and three men wounded.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

Thos. Williamson, Chief-Engineer U. S. N. Lieutenant Commander L. A. Kimberly, Executive Officer U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864.
sir: I respectfully beg leave to report the damage received by this ship in the hull, spars, etc., during the action, August fifth, 1864, with the rebel Fort Morgan, the water-batteries, rebel ram Tennessee, and rebel fleet, namely:

No. 1. Solid shot cut through starboard headrail, starboard bow-chock, and crushed sidetackle block of port rifle-gun on forecastle.

No. 2. Shell came over starboard-bow, struck axle-tree, fore-transom, and truck of port rifle on forecastle, and started bow-chock, head-rail, and water-rail.

No. 3. Shell cut through starboard lower boom, hammock-rail and netting, cut main topmast-stay half, then struck after-part of foremast two feet above the partner's scoring, scarring starboard side of mast and piercing galley-funnel, where it exploded.

No. 4. Shell struck the forward part of No. 2 gun-port, cutting away top timber, bulwarks, and port-sill, struck starboard sheet cable-bitt, crushing the iron plating and collar, then exploded, scarring the deck between Nos. 1, 2, and 3 guns.

No. 5. Shell struck outer planking six inches above the water-line between No. 2 and 3 guns, cut through timbers, ceiling, and water-way on berth-deck, struck foremast, scored in the depth of five inches, eighteen inches below the spardeck partners, carrying away after-part of port-sheet cable-bitts, part of spar-deck beam and knee on port side, and after diagonal knee and fastening started.

No. 6. Shell struck starboard chain-armor two feet below the gunwale, between Nos. 5 and 6 guns, cut through outer plank and timber and lodged in deck-knee.

No. 7. Solid shot struck chain-armor, cut through armor, pierced outer plank and timber, and lodged in spar-deck beam.

No. 8. Solid shot struck starboard chain-armor four inches above the water-line, under No. 6 gun, cut through armor, pierced outer planking, and lodged in timber.

No. 9. Struck chain-armor on the water-line between Nos. 8 and 9 guns, cut through armor, and pierced the outer plank.

No. 10. Two hundred pound rifle-shell struck aft of the armor, two feet above the water-line, under No. 9 gun, pierced outer plank, crushing four timbers and two streaks of ceiling, breaking down the fore and aft bulkhead of the starboard steerage, cutting in two the between-deck stanchion under ward-room hatch-beam, passed into the chief-engineer's room on the port side of ward-room, and dropped on a lounge without exploding.

No. 11. Solid shot struck gunwale-streak, between Nos. 8 and 9 guns, pierced through gunwale, top timber, and bulwarks, struck capstan, crushing the pawls, casting, and gear, splitting engine-room, hatch-combing, and capstan-bed.

No. 12. Struck the spare spars in the mainchains, breaking in two the main and mizzen top-gallant and mizzen royal-yards, crushed through the main-rail and hammock-netting, passed over to the port side, and went through bulwarks, top timbers, outer planks, and sentryboard abaft the port-gangway. [112]

No. 13. Shell passed over between fore and mainmast, struck inner hammock-rail on port side, cut through netting and outer hammockrail, breaking a hole in third cutter.

No. 14. Shell-one hundred and fifty pounder — fired from the ram Tennessee while alongside, the muzzles of her guns touching our port side; the shell struck the outer planking on the port side, pierced through the timbers and ceiling inside, exploded on the berth-deck, fragments of the shell going through the streaks of plank on the spar-deck, through the launch, first and second cutters; portions of the shell also went through the deck-plank and hatches on the berthdeck and dropped into the hold, scarring spardeck beams and deck-frame below fore and mainhatches from port side to starboard.

No. 15. Shell struck grub-beam on forecastle, crushed the upper edge and glanced overboard.

No. 16. Conical shot, or shell, struck the band on starboard side of mainmast, eighteen feet from the partners, pierced through the mast-band and buried its length in the mast.

No. 17. Shot struck the forward starboard-quarter of the mainmast, sixteen feet above the partners, scoring one and a half inches.

No. 18. Shell struck collar of fore-stay, shattered trussle-trees, forward lower cross-tree, heel of fore-topmast, and lodged in forward nut of trussle-trees.

No. 19. Shell struck port side of main-top, crushed a hole in deck of top, and glanced overboard.

No. 20. Shot through smoke-pipe.

In the collision with the rebel ram the porthead pump was crushed in, two feet below the water-line. The copper on the stem and portbow was peeled off by the iron plating of the ram.

The ship received considerable damage by being run into by the Lackawanna. She crushed in the after-part of the main-channel, broke two of the main-chains and spar-crane, with the spars that were stowed, namely, spare-main and mizzen top-gallant and mizzen royal-yards, the main-rail, hammock-rails, netting, bulwarks, top-timbers, outer planking; timbers and ceiling, from gunwale down to two feet of the water-line, were crushed in and broken on the starboard side abaft the main rigging, from the after-side of No. 10 gun-port to the forward side of No. 11 gunport. The deck-knees, diagonal and hanging, are broken, the iron diagonal braces are badly bent in-board, the spar-deck beams and deckplank moved to starboard; abreast of the fracture, the water-way is cut in two. It will be necessary to caulk a large portion of the quarter-deck. The gig-davits were broken, also her keel and planking.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant.

George E. Burceam, Carpenter. Captain P. Drayton, Commanding U. S. S. Hartford.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: In obedience to your order of the sixth instant, I respectfully submit the following report of damages to the rigging of this ship during an engagement with the enemy in Mobile Bay, August fifth, 1864, namely:

After-shroud of fore-rigging shot away, and one collar of the fore-stay shot away; also the lower boom topping-lift and fall and port forebrace; also port and starboard jib-sheets; also port and starboard fore-topsail braces; main topmast-stay stranded; also main topmast staysail halliards and main topsail-halliards and starboard after main topmast backstay stranded and mainlift shot away; also port and starboard crogicbraces shot away, and two starboard main topmast backstay screws carried away.

Very respectfully,

Robert Dixon, Boatswain U. S. N.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864.
sir: In obedience to orders, I respectfully report the damage sustained in the Gunner's department of this ship, and the amount of ammunition expended in the action on the fifth of August with the rebel forts and fleet, to be as follows, namely:

The port one-hundred pounder rifle gun-carriage struck twice and completely shattered; No. 19 gun-carriage, starboard side, struck by shell, splintering right bracket, breaking bracket-bolt and knocking rear dumb-truck out of place; No. 29 gun-carriage, starboard side, scarred by shell bursting and having port-truck broken to pieces; No. 10 nine-inch gun-carriage, injured by being upset when in collision with Lackawanna; three roller hand-spikes broken and four ordinary handspikes broken, three nine-inch gun-tackles carried away, one one-hundred pounder rifle sidetackle-block shattered, one one-hundred pounder breeching and one nine-inch breeching cut with shot, one nine-inch bristle-sponge shot away, two rammers, nine-inch, broken.

Number of rounds expended in action:

powder.

Ninety-five charges thirteen pounds nine-inch, or one thousand two hundred and thirty-five pounds of powder.

Ninety-two charges ten pounds nine-inch, or nine hundred and twenty pounds of powder.

Twenty-seven charges ten pounds one-hundred pounder rifle, or two hundred and seventy pounds of powder.

shell.

Seventy-seven shell, five second, nine-inch.

Fifty-five shell, ten second, nine-inch.

Eighteen shell one-hundred pounder rifle concussion.

Three shell one-hundred pounder rifle Parrott, percussion.

Seven shell twelve-pounder heavy howitzer.

Six shell twelve-pounder light howitzer.

shrapnel.

Nine shrapnel nine-inch.

solid shot.

Thirty-three shot nine-inch.

Six shot one-hundred pounder rifle, chilled ends.

Very respectfully,

John L. Staples, Gunner U. S. N.


[113]

Report of Captain T. A. Jenkins.

U. S. Steamship Richmond, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: It is my agreeable duty to report that the officers and crew of this ship have, without exception, shown an unsurpassed zeal in preparing this ship for battle, and a coolness and courage in conflict with the enemy, that has won my admiration and thanks.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Thornton A. Jenkins, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Flag-Ship Hartford, Mobile Bay.

U. S. Steamer Richmond, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor and very great pleasure to report that in the action this forenoon with the batteries at Fort Morgan, and the rebel ram Tennessee, this ship has received no serious damage, and there were no persons killed. Two men were wounded, but not seriously, and the ship struck a number of times in the hull and rigging.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Thornton A. Jenkins, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Flag-Ship Hartford.

U. S. steamship Richmond, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864.
sir: I have the honor respectfully to submit the following report of the ammunition expended in the attack on the morning of the fifteenth instant, upon Fort Morgan and its water-batteries, and subsequently upon rebel iron-clad casemated steamer Tennessee, namely: In approaching toward and steaming from Fort Morgan and batteries--

(40)Forty ten-second fuze, nine-inch shell.
(30)Thirty fifteen-second nine-inch shell.
abreast of the Fort and batteries.
(60)Nine-inch shell with five-second fuzes.
(16)One-hundred pounder rifle concussion-shell.
(9)One-hundred pounder solid shot.
(14)Thirty-pounder concussion-shell.
(2)Thirty-pounder solid shot.
(5)Twelve-pounder howitzer (heavy) shell from main-top into the water-battery.
(10)Twelve-pounder howitzer (light) shell from fore-top into the water-battery.
(4)Twelve-pounder howitzer (light) shrapnel from fore-top into the water-battery.
iron-clad Tennessee.
(1)One nine-inch solid shot with thirteen-pound charge, fired at the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, at the distance of about four hundred yards.
(32)Solid shot, with thirteen-pound charge, fired at the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, at distances varying from fifty to two hundred yards, and embracing a period of about twenty minutes time.
(155)Ten-pound charges, expended for nine-inch and one-hundred pounder rifle-guns.
(30)Three and a quarter pound charges for thirty-pounder rifle.
(33)Thirteen-pound charges.

The exact number of rifled musket-shots fired into the Tennessee's ports is not known.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Thornton A. Jenkins, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commander-in-Chief W. G. Squadron.


Report of Captain J. B. Marchand.

U. S. Steam-sloop Lackawanna, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report that about sunrise to-day this ship was gotten under way, and the Seminole lashed on the port side. Our position being in the centre of the line of battle, we crossed the bar, and following close on the leading vessels, stood up the channel, and as soon as our guns could be brought to bear, a fire was opened on Fort Morgan with shells, and continued until passing it, when the Seminole was cast off.

Soon after the fleet had passed the middle ground, the rebel iron-clad Tennessee commenced approaching, with the design of attacking our vessels, and in obedience to your signal, I started under the heaviest headway to run her down, and succeeded in striking her at right angles at the after-end of the casemate.

The concussion was great, but the effect on her was only a heavy list, whilst our stern was cut and crushed to the plank ends for a distance of three feet above the water-edge to five feet below, and causing a considerable leak in forward store-room and peak. Fortunately our yards and top-masts were down, otherwise they, in all probability, would have been carried away by the concussion, which caused the ship to rebound, and the stern of the Tennessee to recede. Some panic must have existed on board the enemy, as they fired but two guns through our bows. After striking, the two swung head and stern alongside of each other, and as our guns have been pivoted for the opposite si.de, we succeeded in discharging but one nine-inch shell, that struck one of the enemy's port shutters, which was distant about twelve feet, destroying it, and driving some of the fragments into her casemate. A few of the enemy were seen through their ports, who were using most opprobrious language. Our marines opened upon them with muskets; even a spittoon and a holy-stone were thrown at them from our deck, which drove them away. Upon separating from the Tennessee, our helm was put hard over to make another attempt at running the enemy down, but our great length, and the shallowness of the water, caused us to turn so slowly, that we had not gotten round until again amongst our fleet, and, unfortunately, we collided with the flag-ship, which was running toward the Tennessee, although every exertion was used to prevent it by backing. By this accident two of the quarter-deck ports of the Hartford were knocked into one, without this ship sustaining any injury. After the collision with the flagship, I again started to run down the Tennessee, but whilst still at a distance she surrendered to our fleet. [114]

Our loss throughout the day was four killed and thirty-five wounded.

Herewith I send the reports of the Surgeon, Engineer, and Board of Officers, on the injuries and expenditures.

Under no circumstances could more coolness and bravery have been shown by the crew.

I cannot express my deep feeling for the undaunted courage and the aid given me by all the officers.

Second Lieutenant Hyram Adams, of the Army Signal Corps, with two assistants, were on board, and great credit is due them for their promptness in transmitting signals.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. Marchand, Captain. Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. S. S. Lackawanna, Mobile Bay, Aug. 7, 1864.
sir: In the report made of the part taken by the Lackawanna in passing the forts, and entering Mobile Bay, on the fifth instant, I inadvertently omitted to state that Commander Edward Donaldson, commanding the Seminole, which was lashed alongside of this ship, rendered most efficient service by his coolness and judgment in piloting both vessels until passing Fort Morgan, the regular pilot being sick.

My additional thanks are due him and all his officers and men for volunteering to aid in manning the guns of the Lackawanna, and the continuous fire which they kept up whilst their guns could bear upon the enemy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. Marchand, Captain. Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. S. S. Lackawanna, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: In obedience to your order of the fifth instant, we, the undersigned, have held a strict and careful survey on this ship, and find the damages herewith stated to have resulted from the action of the fifth instant.

That there are five shot-holes through hull of ship, two of which are eighteen inches above water-line, and damages resulting therefrom are as follows: timber, planking, and ceiling badly cut up; spirketing in wake of fore-rigging, and on each of ship, shot away; port forward hammock netting-rail shot away, and panel-work much injured; port sheet cable-bitt splintered the entire length, and iron casing completely shattered; two stanchions of fore fife-rail entirely shot away, also a quarter of fore-mast and after-part, and eighteen inches above deck; water-closets and bulkheads broken down; several hatch gratings much injured, and port swinging boom broken in two.

Between decks we find stanchion, two carlings, hanging knee, water-pipe connecting with condenser, and jackstay shot away; several spardeck beams, coal shoot, starboard sheet cable bitt, bulkheads and doors to fire-room, and forward officers' quarters badly injured with fragments of shell; dispensary very much shattered; berth-deck ladder and two awning stanchions (the latter being placed below for security) broken in two; berth-deck planking, directly forward of galley and under platform, also much injured with fragments of shell.

The damages sustained by running down the rebel iron-clad ram Tennessee, as follows:

The head and cutwater badly injured; the stem, for distance of eighteen feet, and up to wood ends, completely gone; that portion of it comprised between the water-line and draft-mark eight, forced in, causing the planking for distance of several feet to be wrenched from fastening, the ends of which, exposed considerably, and leaving that portion of the bow in a much exposed condition. Not having the means for examining below the draft-mark eight, we are therefore unable to arrive at the extent of injury received below that mark.

We also find the rigging damaged to the following extent: bobstays and port bowsprit shroud carried away; main-stay, after shroud of port fore rigging and screw, boat davit and spanker boom topping lifts, and two nine-inch double blocks shot away.

Very respectfully, your obedient servants,

Felix McCurley, Acting Master. John H. Allen, Acting Master. Thomas Kelly, Acting Boatswain. Francis A. Stanley, Acting Carpenter's Mate. Captain J. B. Marchand, Commanding U. S. Steamship Lackawanna.

U. S. S. Lackawanna, in Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report that the engines, boilers, and appurtenances thereto of this ship are apparently in good working order, though derangements may subsequently become visible, of which we have now no knowledge.

The severe concussion, consequent upon the heavy blow dealt the rebel ram Tennessee, by this vessel, under full headway, may have thrown the engines out of line, or strained the boilers and braces.

Our bunkers being full of coal, we cannot of course speak decidedly with reference to the staying of the boilers.

Very respectfully,

James W. Whiittaker, First Assistant Engineer. Captain J. B. Marchand, Commanding U. S. S. Lackawanna.

U. S. S. Lackawanna, in Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: In obedience to your order of the fifth instant, we have held a strict and careful survey of the amount of ordnance stores used and injured in passing the forts, and beg leave to submit the following report:

We find the rear hurter, strap, band, and tackle-blocks of Parrott's one hundred and fifty pounder rifle, (number twelve,) carried away by a shot entering starboard bow, and the following amount of ordnance, equipment, and stores: [115]

Twenty twenty-pound charges of powder, twelve sixteen-pound charges of powder, twenty-eight fifteen-pound charges of powder, three thirteen-pound charges of powder, twenty-nine ten pound charges of powder, thirteen four-pound charges of powder, eight boarding pikes, four cutlass scabbards, three battle-axe scabbards, two division boxes, six waist-belts, four Enfield rifle bayonets, six Enfield rifles, two navy revolvers, four percussion primer boxes, (tin,) three battle-axes, four brass padlocks, three percussion-cap boxes, (tin,) two pistol frogs, forty musket-ball cartridges, eleven eleven-inch solid shot, one hundred and twenty percussion primers, nine nine-inch solid shot, thirty Enfield refle-ball cartridges, five one hundred and fifty pounder Parrott's solid shot, (long,) seventy revolver percussion-caps, thirty-seven eleven-inch shell, filled and fuzed five seconds; twenty friction primers, twenty-three nine-inch shell, filled and fuzed five seconds; sixty pistol-ball cartridges, seven one hundred and fifty pounder Parrott shell, filled and fuzed, five seconds; thirteen fifty-pounder Hotchkiss shell, filled and fuzed, five seconds; two cutlasses, (Ames,) two hundred musket percussion-caps, three cutlass scabbards, seven Parrott rings, for time fuzes; seven metal time fuzes, five seconds; six eleven-inch selvagee wads, eight nine-inch selvagee wads, two nine-inch passing-boxes.

Very respectfully, your obedient servants.

S. A. Mccarty, Lieutenant United States Navy. G. H. Wadleigh, Ensign. John G. Foster, Gunner, United States Navy. Captain J. B. Marchand, Commanding U. S. S. Lackawana.


Report of Captain James Alden.

U. S. S. Brooklyn, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part that this ship took in the action of yesterday, with Fort Morgan and the rebel ram and gunboats.

In accordance with your instructions and by signal, at fifteen minutes past five we got under way with the Octorara lashed on our port side, and proceeded toward the bar of Mobile entrance. After some little delay in waiting for the ships to form into line, and for the ironclads to precede us, we steamed ahead and passed up the channel toward Fort Morgan, being the leading ship, closely followed by the Admiral and the rest of the fleet in line of battle. At fifteen minutes past six, when about one and a half miles from the Fort, the enemy opened fire upon us, which was immediately returned with bow-chasers, (our two one hundred-pound Parrotts.) The action then commenced, the fire of the enemy being almost entirely directed at the wooden vessels; their ram Tennessee and gunboats soon joining in the fight.

The starboard battery was opened on the Fort, as soon as the guns could be brought to bear. Our progress up the channel was slow, owing to our carrying, as directed, low steam, and the very deliberate movements of our iron-clads which occupied the channel close ahead of us. When we had arrived abreast of the Fort, by a rapid and timely fire of grape, their several batteries were almost entirely silenced.

At this juncture I observed the ill-fated Tecumseh, which was then about three hundred yards ahead of us, and on our starboard bow, careen violently over, and sink almost instantaneously. Sunk by a torpedo! Assassination in its worst form! A glorious though terrible end for our noble friends, the intrepid pioneers of that death-strewed path! Immortal fame is theirs! Peace to their manes! We were now somewhat inside of the Fort, when shoal-water was reported, and at the same time, as the smoke cleared up a little, a row of suspicious-looking buoys was discovered directly under our bows. While we were in the act of backing to clear them, our gallant Admiral passed us and took the lead. Getting headway again as soon as possible, we pushed up the channel at full speed in his wake, when the rebel rain was discovered making for the flag-ship, and at the same time throwing shot and shell at us, which inflicted considerable damage at and above the water-line forward. The rebel gunboats having now taken shelter in shoal-water, I cast off the Octorara from alongside, and directed her to close in and assist the other gunboats in their attack upon them. The Hartford having steamed past the ram with her broadside playing vigorously upon him, continuing our course at full speed and exchanging broadsides as we could bring our guns to bear, she missed us, and just passed clear of our stern only a few yards distant; we then gave her some parting blows with our sixty-pounder Parrott from the poop. At fifty minutes past eight anchored near the flag-ship, about five miles above the Fort, the rebel gunboats firing a few shots at us at longrange as we passed up. At about nine A. M., the Tennessee was discovered standing for the fleet, and we, in company with the flag-ship and several other vessels, made toward him, firing solid shot from our bow-chasers. When within a short distance the Chickasaw crossed our bows and prevented our ramming him. As soon as the ram was clear of the last-named vessel, he made directly at us; put our helm a-port and made at him with full speed, but seeing our torpedo-catcher hanging under the bows, and thinking it was a real torpedo (as an officer belonging to her has since told me) he put his helm hard up and avoided us, giving us some heavy shots in passing. Our shot — solid nine-inch, with thirteen pounds of powder — struck him repeatedly, but without any material effect, except one, which, as it is believed, carried away his smokestack. We then turned to try it again, but the iron-clads had fairly engaged her, and shortly afterward she surrendered.

The fleet here came to near the former anchorage.

The surgeon's list of killed and wounded, together with the forward officers' report of injuries [116] done to the ship by the enemy's shot, and the number of projectiles expended, etc., are herewith inclosed.

Lieutenant Commander Lull, the executive officer, has, at my request, made a statement of some very interesting incidents, giving a list of men who most distinguished themselves during the action, which I take great pleasure in forwarding, with a hearty approval of it, and the suggestions it contains.

It will be seen that we have fifty-four casualties on board; eleven killed, and forty-three wounded; many of the latter, I am happy to say, are slight. The list will not appear large when it is considered that we were nearly two hours under fire. Among the others, we have to regret the loss of an officer, Acting Master's Mate William H. Cook, who was killed while bravely doing his duty, having already been wounded.

By the Carpenter's report, it will be seen that the hull has received extensive and serious injuries, having been struck twenty-three times. Our mainmast is ruined, having been shot through and through the centre, three times between the cathar-pins and the deck, the shotholes being about equidistant from each other. Shot struck the other spars seven times, injuring some badly. The boatswain's report shows the rigging to have been struck and cut in twenty-nine places, making an aggregate of some fifty-nine hits in the hull, rigging, and spars.

The number of projectiles expended is one hundred and eighty-three.

In conclusion, I must beg leave to state that as far as I can learn, every one did his duty nobly and well, and while the officers generally would seem to deserve some especial mention, I must, from the nature of circumstances, confine my notice to those on whom devolved the more important duty of controlling and fighting the ship.

To my executive officer, Lieutenant Commander E. P. Lull, my thanks are especially due, not only for his cool, steady bearing in the fight, but also for the efficient training of the crew, which have been together now less than three months, but displayed in the action the steadiness of veterans, fighting their guns almost as coolly as if they were at an ordinary exercise. Lieutenant Thomas L. Swann, the ordnance officer, had every thing ready, and the working of his department was admirable; he was principally occupied during the action with the bow-chasers. The other division officers-Captain Houston, of the marines, Lieutenant Charles F. Blake, Ensigns Cassel and Sigsbee, with their assistants, Master's Mates Duncan and Stevens — fought their guns nobly and well.

The powder division, under Acting Ensign Utter, could not have been conducted better.

Chief-Engineer Kellogg's department worked beautifully.

Doctor Maulsby was fully prepared for the wounded, and extended to these unfortunates all the solicitude and care that a generous nature could dictate.

Ensign Pendleton, my aid and signal officer, afforded me great assistance, being always prompt and active in his duties.

To our pilot, Mr. Christopher Lawrence, great credit is due for the handsome manner he piloted the ship.

I ought to mention before closing this report, that I was particularly pleased with the cheerful bearing and aid afforded me by Captain E. A. Denicke, of the Army Signal Corps, in watching and pointing. out the effect of our shot in the batteries, and upon the rebel ram and gunboats.

In accordance with your directions, I also send a separate report in regard to those men who were most conspicuous for good conduct and gallantry in the action. It is taken mostly from the report of Lieutenant Commander Lull, the executive officer.

Congratulating you upon the handsome result of the day, I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

James Alden, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding U. S. W. G. B. Fleet, U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford.

U. S. S. Brooklyn, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: In accordance with your instructions, I herewith append a list of. the crew who most distinguished themselves for gallantry and good conduct during the action with Fort Morgan and the rebel ram and gunboats. Feeling satisfied that they have earned that justly prized distinction, the “medal of honor,” I trust the Department will confer it upon them.

J. Henry Dennig, (Sergeant of Marines,) Michael Hudson, (Sergeant of Marines,) and William M. Smith, Miles M. Oriatt, (Corporals of Marines,) for their conspicuous good conduct at their guns.

Barnett Kenna, (Quartermaster,) and William Halsted, (Coxswain,) coolness, bravery, and skill in the working of their guns. Their conduct was particularly meritorious.

Joseph Brown (Quartermaster) and Joseph Irlane, (seaman,) stationed at the wheel, behaved with great coolness and bravery, sending the other two men who were stationed with them, to replace men disabled at the guns.

Edward Price, (Captain,) great coolness and bravery under fire; his gun became disabled by the sponge's breaking, leaving the head in the gun; he proceeded to clear it by pouring down powder into the vent and blowing the spongehead out.

Alexander Mack, (Captain of----,) activity, zeal, and skill displayed in handling his gun, as well as great courage; he was also severely wounded.

William Nichols, (Quartermaster,) perfect coolness and dexterity in handling his gun; always sure of his aim before he would consent to fire.

Nicholas Irwin, (seaman,) John Cooper, (Coxswain,) John Brown, (Forecastle Captain,) and John Irwin, (carpenter,) very conspicuous for bravery, skill, coolness, and activity at their guns.

William Blagden, (ship's cook,) William Madden, (coal-heaver,) James Machon, (boy,) William H. Brown, (landsman,) James Mifflin, (engineer's cook,) conspicuous for bravery, performing their [117] duty in the powder division, at a point where the ship was riddled very much, and in the immediate vicinity of the shell-whips, which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells. Brown was also wounded.

James E. Sterling, (coal-heaver,) bravery in remaining at his post when wounded, and passing shell until struck down a second time and completely disabled.

Richard Dennis (Boatswain's Mate,) and Samuel H. Davis displayed much courage, bravery, and coolness, the first in operating the torpedo-catcher, and assisting in working the bowchaser, and the latter in acting as a lookout for torpedoes and other obstructions.

Samuel Todd, (quartermaster,) conspicuous coolness at the commencement.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

James Alden, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. S. Brooklyn, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: The accompanying reports of the boatswain, gunner, and carpenter, of the damages sustained by this ship, and of the ammunition expended during our action of yesterday with the rebel forts and gunboats, and with the ram Tennessee, are respectfully forwarded:

The sailmaker being one of the wounded, is not able to make a report, but the damages in his department are a number of cloths cut in the port head of the fore-topsail, and considerable injury to the hammock cloths fore and aft.

One of the shots mentioned by the carpenter as wounding the rail of the top-gallant forecastle, struck directly under the breast of the bow, and had its force not been nearly spent, as is supposed, by its having previously passed through some of the wood-work of the iron-clad Chickasaw, it must inevitably have disabled the gun.

In the vicinity of number four port on the starboard side, in the space of about eight feet square, five shot or shells passed through the side, and one shell struck the sheet-anchor which was stowed above this port, breaking the shank. The lower fluke is also broken off. The gun was entirely disabled.

Acting Master's Mate Cook and three men were killed, and Lieutenant Blake and six men wounded. A shell which exploded on the berthdeck forward killed or wounded every man at the two shell-whips, and those who were passing shell between them, also carrying away one whip.

Acting Ensign Utter, and his assistant, sailmaker Brayton, rigged another whip and stationed new men to man it, and just as they were recommencing work, a second shell exploded again, clearing away every man, this time including Mr. Brayton among the wounded, and depriving us of the services of an active and very efficient officer.

Mr. Baker, the Paymaster's Clerk, performed very good service in the powder division, taking voluntary charge of the after-shell whip, at which no officer was stationed, owing to our being short of officers. Our chain-cable, ranged up and down the starboard side, saved our boilers from one shot, and the sand-bags upon the berthdeck saved them from one if not two more.

The ship's company behaved remarkably well, so much so as to make it difficult to specify even conspicuous conduct without making a rather large list; but I beg to call your especial attention to the following cases mentioned by the division officers, many of which also fell under my own observation, and to request that you will recommend them for the “medal of honor:”

J. Henry Dennig, (Sergeant of Marines,) Michael Hudson, (Sergeant of Marines,) and William M. Smith and Miles M. Oriatt, (Corporals of Marines,) for conspicuous good conduct at their guns.

Barnett Kenna, (Quartermaster,) and William Halsted, (Coxswain,) coolness, bravery, and skill in working their guns. Their conduct was particularly meritorious.

Joseph Brown, (Quartermaster,) and Joseph Irlane, (seaman,) stationed at the wheel, behaved with great coolness and bravery, sending the other two men who were stationed with them to replace men disabled at the guns.

Edward Price, (Coxswain,) great coolness and bravery under fire; his gun became disabled by the sponge breaking, leaving the head in the gun; he proceeded to clear it by pouring down powder into the vent and blowing the sponge-head out.

Alexander Mack, (Captain of Top,) remarkable coolness and courage, was wounded and sent below, but immediately returned and took charge of his gun; remained until he was again wounded twice and entirely disabled.

William Robinson, (Captain of Top,) activity, zeal, and skill displayed in handling his gun, as well as great courage.

William Nichols, (Quartermaster,) perfect coolness and dexterity in handling his gun; always sure of his aim before he would consent to fire.

Nicholas Irwin, (seaman,) John Cooper, (Coxswain,) John Brown, (Captain of Forecastle,) and John Irwin, (Coxswain,) very conspicuous for bravery, skill, coolness, and activity at their guns.

William Blagden, (ship's cook,) William Madden, (coal-heaver,) James Machon, (boy,) William H. Brown, (landsman,) and James Mifflin, (engineer's cook,) conspicuous for bravery, performing their duty in the powder division, at a point where the ship was riddled very much, and in the immediate vicinity of the shell-whips, which were twice cleared of men by bursting shells.

James E. Sterling, (coal-heaver,) bravery in remaining at his post when wounded, and passing shell until struck down a second time and completely disabled.

Richard Dennis (Boatwain's Mate,) and Samuel H. Davis displayed much courage and coolness, the first in operating the torpedo-catcher, and assisting in working of the bow-chaser, and the latter in acting as a lookout for torpedoes and other obstructions.

Samuel Todd, (Quartermaster,) conspicuous coolness at the commencement.

We have found upon our decks and extracted [118] from the wood-work over eleven hundred pounds of iron in the shape of eight, nine, and ten-inch solid shot of rifle bolts — shells and fragments of shells — all thrown at us by the enemy, a large amount as being at very close quarters, nearly all their shot passed through and through us.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

Edward P. Lull. Lieutenant Commander and Executive Officer. Captain James Alden, Commanding U. S. S. Brooklyn.

U. S. S. Brooklyn, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the following as the damages inflicted upon this ship during our engagement of to-day, with the rebel Fort Morgan, and the rebel gunboats.

1. Shot carried away a portion of the rail on top-gallant forecastle directly under the breast of bow gun.

2. Shot passed directly through the stem about one foot from water's edge.

3. Passed through the side, just under the bridle-port, struck the deck above upon the opposite side, and shows in the water-way above.

4. Passed through the side just at the copper's edge, or little abaft the bridle-port. Entered the store-room, destroying a hanging knee, and wounding a beam, did much damage to fixtures of storeroom; struck the opposite side, but did not penetrate.

5. Passed through side just forward of and under number two port, and struck the galley.

6. Passed through side on berth-deck, abreast of galley, destroying hanging knee.

7. Passed through the side diagonally about two feet above berth-deck, passed out through opposite side.

8. Through side abreast fore-hatch, destroying an air-port and a berth-deck, hanging knee. Entered fireman's wash-room, arrested by sand-bags.

9. Under after-ports of fore-channels, through side destroying a berth-deck, hanging knee, and a force-pump, wounded berth-deck, cut starboard chain.

10. Four feet abaft number nine, passed through side, destroying an air-port, and two berth-deck hanging knees.

11. Passed through the side, and exploded in the dispensary, doing considerable damage.

12. Passed through side, through deck in Second Assistant Engineer's room, and into main hold, doing much damage.

13. Through side, cutting main rail, just abaft number two port.

14. On the same level, through side about four feet abaft number thirteen.

15. Struck and broke starboard sheet anchor-beak. Cut main rail just over number four port, passed through bottom of the launch, and destroyed forward shore of launch.

16. Through side just under number fifteen, cutting through spar deck water-way, and carrying away the starboard truck of gun number three.

17. Carried away flue of sheet-anchor. Cut through main rail, destroyed after-shore of launch, and struck the breech of number five gun, port.

18. Passed through hammock netting starboard side, just abaft number eight port, and passed out through opposite side.

19. Plunging shot passed through port hammock netting just forward of break of poop.

20. Wounded top of hammock-rail on starboard side between numbers eight and nine ports, passed out through hammock netting on port side.

21. Followed same course of twenty a few feet farther aft.

22. A ricochet shot struck poop-deck, crushed it down together with beam underneath, and ricocheted overboard. This shot killed two marines, carrying one overboard with it.

23, 24, 25. Three shots passed through the mainmast, ruining the mast; number twenty-five also cut the brass band on starboard quarter of main-yard, wounding the yard.

26. Apparently a fragment of shell entered the mainmast.

27. Wounded jib-boom.

28. Passed along fore-topsail yard, destroyed port yard-arm.

29. A raking shot from ram Tennessee struck and passed along port side under the rail.

30. Carried away torpedo-catcher. A shot passed through the dingy. A plank was started in the barge, supposed to have been by a splinter.

Respectfully submitted,


U. S. S. Brooklyn, inside Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I respectfully beg to report the damages sustained in the Ordnance Department of this ship during the engagement of the fifth inst., as follows, namely:

One nine-inch gun-carriage entirely destroyed; one one-hundred pounder elevating screw destroyed; one one-hundred pounder lock destroyed; one sixty-pounder lock destroyed; one nine-inch breech sight-brass damaged; one nine-inch breech sight-brass destroyed; one nine-inch gun-carriage slightly damaged; six nine-inch side-tackles destroyed; two nine-inch rammers destroyed; two nine-inch sponges destroyed; one nine-inch rolling hand-spike destroyed; one nine-inch ladle; one one-hundred pounder ladle.

I am, sir, most respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

John Queredo. Acting Gunner.

U. S. S. Brooklyn, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864.
sir: In obedience to your order, I respectfully submit the following report of damages done to rigging during the action of the fifth instant, with Fort Morgan, rebel ram Tennessee, and gunboats Selma, Morgan, and Gaines, having made a careful examination of the same.

Jib and flying jib, martingale-stays, and backstays stays shot away [119]

Port cat-block shot away, also three deck-stop-pers. Fore-rigging, two shrouds starboard, and one port shot away; one shroud shot away in two places; two dead eyes starboard, fore-rigging shot away; starboard fore-topsail halliards shot away; port fore-brace shot away; port fore-topsail brace and block shot away; starboard sheet-anchor shank broke, and flue shot off; port main-stay shot away; main rigging six shrouds shot away, four starboard and two port; one dead eye port main rigging shot away.

Main lift and brace shot away.

Main topsail clewlines and buntlines shot away.

Main topmast rigging stranded.

One shroud, mizzen-rigging shot away. One laniard port mizzen-rigging shot away.

Starboard cross-tack, and mizzen topsail-brace shot away.

A shot passed through the top-gallant and royal rigging barricaded in the sick bay, and lodged in the port water-ways.

Starboard sheet-chain shot away.

No doubt a great deal of the gear is cut, but how much cannot be ascertained until broken out. Also the starboard bow-chain shot away.

Very respectfully,

Charles A. Braydon, Boatswain U. S. N. Lieut. Com. Edward O. Lull, Executive Officer U. S. S. Brooklyn.

U. S. S. Brooklyn, inside Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I respectfully report the expenditure of ordnance stores in this ship during the engagement of the fifth instant, as follows, namely:

One hundred ten-pound charges, (nine-inch;) thirty-two thirteen-pound charges, (nine-inch;) thirty-seven ten-pound charges, (one-hundred pounder;) fourteen six-pound charges, (sixty-pounder;) fifty five-second shell, (nine-inch;) twenty-five ten-second shell, (nine-inch;) twenty stands of grape, (nine-inch;) thirty seven solid shot, (nine-inch;) twenty-five solid shot, (one-hundred pounder;) twelve shell Tico's concussion, (one-hundred pounder;) twelve solid shot, (sixty-pounder;) two shell, Tico's concussion, (sixty-pounder.)

I am, sir, most respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

John Queredo, Acting Gunner.


Report of Commander J. H. Strong.

U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the part taken by this ship under my command in the action of yesterday, in passing the Mobile Forts, etc.

At half-past 5 A. M. got under way in obedience to signal, took my station in the line, and prepared for action.

At ten minutes past seven the action was commenced by the first guns being fired from the Fort. After passing the forts I saw the rebel ram Tennessee head in for the line. I then sheered out of the line to run into her, at the same time ordering full speed as fast as possible. I struck her fair, and swinging round poured in a broadside of solid eleven-inch shot, which apparently had but little if any effect upon her. Soon after, signal was made to my ship to again run into her. I did so, and was about to try it the third time, when she surrendered to the fleet.

During the action my officers and men, without exception, behaved in the most gallant manner. It would be impossible to make any distinction where all did every thing that could have been desired.

I would here mention that a volunteer crew from the U. S. S. Kennebec, in charge of Acting Ensign Ellis, came on board and manned one of my thirty-two pounder broadside guns during the engagement with Fort Morgan. Their conduct during the action was gallant, and met with my entire approbation.

I regret to say that my First Lieutenant, Mr. Prentiss, lost a leg in the action, and that fears are entertained for his life.

Inclosed I send you the Executive Officer's report of the expenditure of ammunition, and the damages sustained, also the Surgeon's and Engineer's reports.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. H. strong, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, U. S. S. Flag-Ship Hartford, Mobile Bay.

U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the following injuries sustained by this vessel during the action of to-day with Fort Morgan and the rebel fleet inside.

In twice attempting to run down the rebel iron-clad ram Tennessee, our iron prow was entirely carried away, together with the cut-water. The butt ends of the planking on both bows are started from the stem and badly shattered, the port ones considerably sprung off.

Two six-inch rifle-shell from the ram entered our starboard bow; one between the planking and cutwater, grazing the perpendicular, striking the under side of the breast-hook, ricocheting, passing through the boatswain's store-room, and striking the berth-deck, where it lodged without exploding. The other entered about twelve feet further aft, and exploded on the berth-deck, slightly wounding three men, breaking an eleven-inch scraper and an eleven-inch worm, and bending a stanchion near the galley. A six-inch rifle-shell exploded underneath the No. 1 pivot port, raking up the side in ten or fifteen places, many of the pieces remaining in the side. One six-inch solid shot entered abreast No. 2 pivot port, passing through the boatswain's room, starboard side, berth-deck, paymaster's issuing room, port side, and lodging in the outer planking, springing off one butt about eight inches. One ten-inch shot or shell came in our starboard gangway, carrying away head-board of starboard quarterdeck hammock netting, grazing top-rail and mainmast, and passing through port side under main [120] channels. Pieces of the head-board were driven through the fire-room ventilators.

Lieutenant Prentiss and two men were wounded by this shot.

In the rigging fore-peak halliards, end of main stay and port ridge rope shot away.

I also report the following expenditure of ammunition:

Seventeen shells, one hundred and fifty pounder rifle; six solid shot, one hundred and fifty pounder rifle; eight solid shot, eleven-inch; seven shrapnel, eleven-inch; twenty-five shells, eleven-inch; four canister, eleven-inch; seven grape, eleven-inch; forty-seven shells, thirty-two-pounder; three solid shot, thirty-two-pounder; forty-seven shells, twelve-pounder rifle howitzer; one hundred and seventy percussion-primers; twenty-three cartridges, one hundred and fifty pounder rifle, sixteen pounds; eight cartridges, eleven-inch, twenty pounds; forty-three cartridges, eleven-inch, fifteen pounds; fifty cartridges, thirty-two-pounder, nine pounds; forty-seven cartridges, twelve-pounder rifle howitzer; four shells, twenty-four-pounder howitzer.

The slide of starboard twenty-four pounder howitzer was found to be rotten, and after the first few rounds, was rendered totally unfit for use. With this exception, the battery is in as good condition for service as before the action.

Very respectfully, etc.,

O. A. Batcheller, Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Commander J. H. strong, Commanding Monongahela.

U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have to report that during the engagement with the enemy to-day, we received no damage in the Engineer's Department, with the exception of a shot through fireroom ventilator, and one through the smoke-pipe.

At the time we ran into the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, the engines were making sixty-two revolutions per minute, with thirty pounds steam and throttle-valve wide open.

The engines worked well, and every engineer, fireman, and coal-heaver performed their respective duties in a highly satisfactory manner.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. Kutz, Chief Engineer. Commander J. H. strong, Commanding U. S. S. Monongahela.

U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 10, 1864.
sir: The following persons, wounded in the action of the fifth instant, were sent to the Naval Hospital at Pensacola.

Lieutenant R. Prentiss, both legs, left one amputated.

Michael Smith, boy, scalp.

Wm. Feeney, private marine, contusions.

I am, respectfully,

David Kindleberger, Surgeon U. S. Navy. Commander James A. strong, Commanding U. S. S. Monongahela.


Report of Commander Wm. E. Le Roy.

U. S. Steam-sloop Ossipee.
Admiral: I have the honor to report that in passing the forts, and in the attack upon the iron-clad Tennessee, this ship was struck four times in the hull and several times in the rigging, fortunately without disabling the ship. Our stem is somewhat injured by running against the Tennessee. Our casualties I am pleased to report as small. When about running down the Tennessee, she displayed a white flag, but not in time to prevent my colliding with her; having been so disabled by the fire of the fleet and unable longer to continue the contest, and I was fortunate in receiving her surrender from Commander Johnston, her Commander--Admiral Buchanan being wounded — a prize to the fleet under your command.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

Wm. E. Le Roy, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay.

U. S. S. Ossipee, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
Admiral: In my report of the part this ship took in the passage of Fort Morgan yesterday, I neglected to allude to the efficient manner in which Lieutenant Commander George W. Brown, with the Itasca lashed alongside of me, performed his duty of piloting both vessels, etc.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Wm. E. Le Roy, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay.

U. S. S. Ossipee, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of damages received by this vessel in the late engagement with Fort Morgan and the rebel ram Tennessee.

Part of fore-foot gone, occasioned by collision with the Tennessee. One shot, a hundred and thirty pounder, passed through forward starboard section port and ship's side, destroying a knee in the boatswain's room, also carrying away the bulkheads of same and issuing room. Another shot passed through ship's side and starboard forward coal-bunker. One shot passed through the chain-armor, first forward of starboard gangway at water's edge, through ship's side and starboard coal-bunker, landing in port coal-bunker, passing within three inches of the steam-pipe. Also a shot-hole through ship's side and water-ways, under the starboard main channels; the shot carried away one chain-plate, and badly splintered the water-ways. The shot that passed through chain-armor and coal-bunker is a ten-inch columbiad.

Very respectfully,

J. A. Howell, Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Commander W. E. Le Roy, Commanding U. S. Steam-Sloop Ossipee.

[121]

U. S. S. Ossipee, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to inclose the accompanying reports of injuries sustained by this ship in the engagement of yesterday, as also of the amount of ammunition expended. In addition to my report of yesterday, I would state all under my command showed such zeal and energy that it would be invidious to select any one as more deserving than another.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Wm. E. Le Roy, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay.

U. S. S. Ossipee, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I respectfully report that the damages done to the rigging on board this vessel on the fifth instant were as follows:

Starboard fore-stay shot away, also three strands of the port fore-stay.

Very respectfully,

Andrew Milne, Boatswain U. S. N. Commander Wm. E. Le Roy, Commanding U. S. Steam-Sloop Ossipee.

U. S. S. Ossipee, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I would most respectfully submit the following report of the expenditures of ammunition and projectiles, while engaging the rebel forts and vessels of war, by this ship, August fifth, 1864.

Shells, five sec., thirty; ten sec., six; fifteen sec., two; twenty sec., seven; percussion, thirty-two. Solid shots, eleven-inch, four; one-hundred-pounder, two; thirty-two-pounder, six; hollow shots, thirty-pounder, four. Powder, number seven cannon, three hundred and sixty-five pounds; ordinary powder, three hundred and fifty-four pounds.

Very respectfully,



Report of Commander E. Donaldson.

U. S. Steamer Seminole, Mobile Bay, Aug. 7, 1864.
sir: In obedience to your order for passing the forts on the fifth instant, at half-past 5 A. M., we went alongside, and made fast on the port side of the Lackawanna, and took our designated station in the line, and am happy to say we had no casualties on board.

The hull of the ship was not struck at all. One strand of the port mainstay was cut by a fragment of a shell.

At fifteen minutes past eight A. M. we cast off from the Lackawanna, and at fifteen minutes past eight A. M. came to anchor. At half-past 9 A. M., seeing the rebel ram Tennessee approaching us, we slipped to avoid her, and at fifteen minutes past ten A. M. returned to our anchorage, after having delivered two broadsides at her, at a distance of about one thousand yards. I am happy to say that all the officers and crew behaved with the utmost coolness.

Respectfully, etc.,

Edward Donaldson, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay, Ala.

U. S. steamer Seminole, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have to report that, in passing the fort yesterday, we met with no casualties in killed or wounded. One shot from the water-battery cut one strand of our mainstay, which is the only injury done to the ship or rigging. Respectfully your obedient servant,

Edward Donaldson, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Ala.

U. S. steamer Seminole, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: The following is a report of expenditure of ammunition on board this vessel in the engagement of yesterday: Five ten-second eleven-inch shell; four thirty-two pounder solid shot; sixteen thirty-pounder Parrott rifle-shell; two thirty-pounder Parrott rifle-shot; five fifteen-pound charges; four six-pound charges; eighteen three and a quarter pound charges.

Respectfully your obedient servant,

Edward Donaldson, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay, Ala.


Report of Commander T. H. Stevens.

U. S. Monitor Winnebago, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
To Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron:
sir: I have the honor to report that, according to instructions, this vessel yesterday, at half-past 5 A. M. got under way from her anchorage near Sand Island, and proceeded up the bay for the purpose of attacking the enemy.

At seven took station between Fort Morgan and the wooden vessels of the fleet in line of battle.

At fifteen minutes past seven opened fire on the fort, the enemy firing rapidly. At eight the United States Monitor Tecumseh was blown up and sunk by a torpedo when within about a cable length of us, and shortly after the following men, having been saved from the wreck, were brought on board in a boat belonging to the Metacomet:

Acting Ensign John B. Zellick, Quartermaster Wm. Roberts, Quartermaster Chauncey P. Dean. Seamen: George Major, James McDonald. Ordinary seamen: James Burnes, Charles Packand, James Lands, William Tidder. Coal-passer: William West.

At half-past 8 passed Fort Morgan, and steamed slowly up the bay. At ten minutes past nine the after-turret broke down. At fifteen minutes past nine received order from flag-ship to attack the rebel ram Tennessee, which surrendered at forty-five minutes past nine. Anchored with the fleet at forty-five minutes past ten in the lower fleet anchorage of Mobile Bay.

Inclosed please receive engineer's report of condition of the turrets, and the gunner's account of ammunition expended.

The Winnebago was struck nineteen times, three of the shot having penetrated the deck near the after-turret. [122]

I have to report no casualties. The officers and men conducted themselves well; and to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. T. Shankland, First Assistant-Engineer John Purdy, who volunteered for this vessel, and the pilot, William H. Wroten, I am indebted for valuable assistance.

I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant,

T. H. Stevens, Commander.

U. S. S. Winnebago, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to inform you that the following is a correct list of ordnance stores expended whilst engaging the rebel batteries and fleet: Fifty-two eleven-inch charges, fifteen pounds each; two eleven-inch charges, twenty-five pounds each; six eleven-inch shell, five seconds each; twelve eleven-inch shell, ten seconds each; fourteen eleven-inch shrapnel, five seconds each; six stands of grape; two stands of canister; fourteen eleven-inch solid shot, or dinary steel; two eleven-inch solid shot, ordinary steel.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

Robert Sherman, Acting Gunner. To Com. Thomas Stevens, U. S. Navy, Commanding U. S. S. Winnebago.


Report of Commander J. W. A. Nicholson.

U. S. S. Manhattan, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this ship in the action of the fifth instant with Fort Morgan and the rebel iron-clad Tennessee.

At five minutes past seven A. M. I opened on the Fort, but owing to the dense smoke from the guns our firing was necessarily very slow.

After passing Fort Morgan, I devoted my attention entirely to the rebel iron-clad, firing my guns slowly and with great precision.

At forty-five minutes past nine I obtained a raking position under his stern, and fired a solid shot, which struck him on the port quarter, carrying away his steering gear.

At fifty-seven minutes past nine, when on the point of firing from the same position, he hauled down his colors and surrendered.

I fired at the Tennessee six times, namely, one shell, two solid, and three cored shot.

I am satisfied that most, if not all, the serious damage she has sustained was caused by the fifteen-inch shot from this vessel.

This ship was struck by the enemy's shot nine times, causing no material damage; but of this I will make a separate report.

No person was injured on board. Officers and men all did their duty; but I especially recommend Acting Ensign John B. Trott, who was stationed at the wheel steering the ship himself, for the admirable manner in which he performed his duty.

Also Acting Master Robert B. Ely, for the manner in which he worked his guns.

Both of these gentlemen, I think, are worthy of being advanced a grade in the service.

One of the fifteen-inch carriages is temporarily disabled by the breaking of some bolts.

I am, very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

J. W. A. Nicholson, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay, Ala.

U. S. Iron-clad Manhattan, Mobile Bay, Ala., August 8, 1864.
sir: Of the six fifteen-inch projectiles fired from this vessel at the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, I claim four as having struck, doing most of the real injuries that she has sustained, namely: First, one shot on port beam, going entirely through the armor, and crushing the wood backing, making a hole completely through the vessel; second, one shot near the first, but higher up and farther forward, making a deep indentation, and then glancing over the ship; third, a shell striking her stern port shutter, disabling it, so that the gun could not be used; fourth, a shot striking her stern, ripping up the deck plating, carrying away her steering gear, and then striking her armor at the angle of the port quarter, crushing it and starting the wood backing through to the inside.

I am, very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

J. W. A. Nicholson, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, U. S. N. Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay, Ala.

U. S. iron-clad Manhattan, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the following as the expenditures of ammunition in action of to-day with the rebel Fort Morgan and the rebel iron-clad Tennessee: Four fifteen-inch shell; three fuzes--three and a half, seven, and ten sec. Three fifteen-inch solid shot; four fifteen-inch cored shot; four fifteen-inch charges, thirty-five pounds; four fifteen-inch charges, fifty pounds; three fifteen-inch charges, sixty pounds.

Respectfully your obedient servant,

C. M. Schoonmaker, Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Com. J. W. A. Nicholson, U. S. N., Commanding Manhattan.

U. S. iron-clad Manhattan, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the following damages sustained by this ship in action of today with the rebel Fort Morgan and the rebel iron-clad Tennessee:

turret.

One two and a quarter-inch indentation from conical steel-pointed shot, four feet from deck.

One seven-eighth inch indentation from glancing shot, two feet from deck.

One seven-eighth inch indentation just above base ring; outside, three rivet-heads knocked off and seven started.

Base ring separated slightly.

pilot house.

One one and a quarter-inch indentation from conical shot, four feet three inches from base. [123]

Outside, one rivet-head knocked off and two started.

Inside, one rivet-head knocked off and two started.

armor.

Struck by glancing shot on starboard quarter, a few feet forward of propeller and ten inches below the deck.

Separated armor-plates slightly for five feet.

A shot passed through both quarters of our boat, and through the gunwale of the other.

One ventilator-stay was shot away.

Ventilator dented by a fragment of shell.

A shot passed through boiler-iron around rim of turret.

The carriage of port fifteen-inch gun was disabled by the recoil, carrying away six bolt-heads, securing composition plates.

Respectfully your obedient servant,

C. M. Schoonmaker, Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Commander J. W. A. Nicholson, Commanding Manhattan.

U. S. S. Manhattan, August 5, 1864.
sir: I respectfully submit the following report of the working of the machinery of this vessel during the action to-day.

Though having been tested severely during the chase of the rebel ram Tennessee, every thing worked well, and is now ready for service at any moment.

Very respectfully your obedient servant,

Charles L. Carty, Acting Chief-Engineer. Commander J. W. A. Nicholson, Commanding U. S. S. Manhattan.


Report of Lieutenant Commander C. H. Wells.

U. S. Steamer Galena, Mobile Bay, Ala., Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I herewith report to you the part which this steamer took in passing Forts Morgan and Gaines yesterday.

Before leaving the anchorage off Mobile Bar, the Galena was lashed to the port side of the Oneida, according to your diagram of line of battle furnished, and occupied the rear of the line. Fort Morgan began firing at five minutes past seven A. M., when the Oneida replied and was followed by this vessel at twenty-five minutes past seven with the one-hundred pounder rifle on the forecastle, which took effect in the Fort. When abreast and within four hundred yards of it, Captain Mullany of the Oneida was wounded badly in the arm and leg, and the steering apparatus of his vessel was shot away, which was shortly afterward followed by the explosion of one of her boilers, caused by a heavy shot striking it; and this rendered it necessary for the Galena to tow the Oneida by Forts Morgan and Gaines under a severe raking fire from the former, which was accomplished by fifteen minutes past nine.

Both vessels were repeatedly struck, but the Oneida, from having been on the starboard side of this steamer, suffered severely, losing a number of men killed, and having a number wounded. Her Captain, J. R. M. Mullany, under the most trying circumstances, displayed the utmost courage and gallantry whilst passing through a terrific fire, and only left the deck when he had been severely wounded. His executive officer, Lieutenant Huntington, cheerfully carried out my orders after the disability of Captain Mullany, and distinguished himself by his coolness and bravery.

I take pleasure in bringing to your notice the Executive Officer of this vessel, A. V. Lieutenant C. W. Wilson, who faithfully carried out my orders in passing Fort Morgan, as well as in the exhibition of coolness and bravery. Acting Master D. C. Kells, Acting Ensigns Pease and Miner, and Acting Master's Mates Tuttle and Delano, I would also recommend to your favorable notice for their good conduct under the fire of the enemy.

Mr. Buehler, First Assistant Engineer and Acting Chief, managed the Engineer's department in a highly creditable manner, in which he was sustained by the Assistant-Engineers Greenleaf, Scot, Burns, and Weecker.

Acting Assistant-Paymaster Kitchen and Lesley G. Morrow, Captain's Clerk, remained on deck during the action, and contributed their parts to my entire satisfaction. Acting Assistant-Surgeon George P. Wright not only attended to our three cases of wounded, (one mortally,) but gave his professional services to the Oneida, to several of their wounded who came on board of this steamer.

The crew manifested the utmost courage throughout the affair, which will always reflect creditably upon you and the Navy of the United States.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. H. Wells, Lieutenant Commander, U. S. N. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford.

U. S. steamer Galena, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I herewith inclose the following list of damages this steamer sustained in passing Forts Morgan and Gaines, between the hours of seven and ten on the morning of the fifth.

One ten inch shot in starboard bow.

One ten-inch shot in starboard waist abaft plank sheer.

One ten-inch shot through smoke-stack above bridge.

One shot through gig.

One shot through cutter.

Mizzen-stay cut away.

One shot cutting away boat-davit.

One shot striking one-hundred pounder rifle.

Two stands grape cut away. Port boarding nettings cut by raking fire, cut up rails of top-gallant forecastle, cutting rammers and spongers of bow-pivot; mizzen rigging cut away by a stand of grape; chain and running rigging badly cut up.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. H. Wells, Lieutenant Commanding U. S. N. Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.


[124]

Report of Lieutenant Commander J. E. Jouett.

U. S. S. Metacomet, Bay of Mobile,Aug. 8, 1864.
sir: Agreeably to your order of the seventh instant, I have the honor to make the following report of the successful passage of the forts and the capture or dispersion of the rebel fleet inside the bay.

At half-past 4 A. M. of the fifth, I ran alongside of the Hartford and lashed on her port side. At fifty minutes after six the Tecumseh hoisted her colors and fired a gun. Fort Morgan replied. In a short time the action became general between the Fort, iron-clads, Brooklyn, Hartford, and Richmond. At this time the rebel fleet took their stations across the channel, delivering a raking fire upon our line. Thirty-five minutes past seven, amidst the hottest of the fire, the Tecumseh was blown up. I immediately sent a boat to her assistance in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Nields, who pulled to the spot when she sank, and succeeded in saving one acting ensign, eight men, and a pilot. It is unnecessary for me to comment upon what he did; you know the situation under which he gallantly performed this duty; he delivered the men to the Winnebago, and then joined the Oneida, and asked for some duty. When the Oneida anchored he rejoined me up the bay. At forty minutes past seven the Brooklyn backed down the line, when the Hartford shot ahead, leading the fleet in past the forts. At this time a shell from the rebel gunboat Selma passed through this vessel into the forward store-room, killing one man and wounding another, and setting the ship on fire. By prompt action on the part of Acting Ensign G. E. Wing, in charge of powder division, we succeeded in extinguishing it. At five minutes past eight cast off from the Hartford and steamed for the three rebel gunboats, who were annoying the fleet by a raking fire. They steamed up the bay, engaging us with their stern guns, of which they had three each. At half-past 8 the Gaines retreated under cover of the fort in a crippled condition. At nine the Morgan hauled off to starboard, and at ten minutes past nine the Selma struck her flag to this ship. I immediately despatched a boat, in charge of Acting Master N M. Dyre to take charge of the prize, and to send her Captain and First Lieutenant on board. He hoisted the American flag, and reported Captain Murphy wounded and First Lieutenant killed. He transferred fifty of her crew to this vessel, and at fifty minutes past nine Captain P. N. Murphy came on board and surrendered his sword and vessel. She had five killed and ten wounded, including the Captain, two of which have since died. The dead and wounded were attended to. The remainder of her crew and officers were sent to the Port Poyal. Put engineers and firemen on board and steamed to the fleet, reporting the capture of the confederate steamer Selma, which vessel mounted two nine-inch Dahlgren smooth bore, one six and a half inch rifle, and one eight and a half inch smooth bore, all on pivot, with a crew all told of ninety-four men. I am much indebted to the executive officer, H. T. Sleeper, for his cool, prompt, and officer-like conduct; he is a valuable officer. For the efficient handling of the vessel, I am much indebted to Acting Master N. M. Dyre, who had permission to go North on leave, but volunteered to remain to assist in the attack upon the forts. Acting Ensign John White was cool and deliberate, working his rifle-gun with good effect. Acting Master's Mates Goodwin and Miller performed their duties with promptness and zeal, making good shots with their nine-inch guns. Acting Third Assistant-Engineer King, who was much exposed at the engine-bell, never failed to pull the proper bell; and to the efficient arrangement of the Engineer department and the prompt answer to the bells, I am indebted to First Assistant-Engineer Atkin. The gunner, Mr. Lamen, attended in both shell-rooms and magazines, forward and aft, and kept the guns more than supplied. I cannot close this long report without calling your attention to Assistant-Surgeon Payne of this vessel. By his report we had one killed and two wounded. That evening there were placed on board this vessel some sixty badly wounded officers and men, to be conveyed to Pensacola. He was untiring in his attention, watching and tending them at all times. He deserves especial mention for his great and successful exertions. This ship was struck eleven times, doing but little damage, shots mostly above the hull.

I herewith submit the reports of the Executive Officer and Surgeon.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

James E. Jouett, Lieutenant Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.
Ammunition consumed on board the U. S. S. Metacomet, August fifth, 1864:

Twenty-five charges powder, (ten pounds,) one-hundred pounder; fifteen shell, percussion, one-hundred pounder; ten shell, long five-second one-hundred pounder; twenty charges powder, (ten pounds,) nine-inch gun; five shell, five-second nine-inch gun; ten shell, ten-second, nine-inch gun; five shot, grape, nine-inch gun; two shot, solid, nine-inch gun; six shot, solid, (thirty-two pounds;) one hundred primers, cannon; five charges powder, (one pound,) howitzer; five shell, percussion, howitzer; five fixed ammunition howitzer; four shrapnel, howitzer; to shell, fixed ammunition, howitzer.

I do certify that the above is a correct statement of the ammunition consumed on the fifth day of August, 1864.

Very respectfully,

James Lamen. Acting Gunner.
Report of damages sustained by the U. S. S. Metacomet during the engagement of the fifth instant.

One shell through starboard-bow, exploding in the store-room; one shell on port bow; one shot through foremast, cutting two forward shrouds, port side; one cutting off heads of fire-room ventilators; one through smoke-stack; one through escape-pipe; [125] two bursting in starboard paddle-box; one through top of after pilot-house; one cutting mainsail in two; one striking and bending the after quarter davit.

Very respectfully,

Henry P. Sleeper, Executive Officer.


Report of Lieutenant Commander B. Gherardi.

U. S. S. Port Royal, Mobile Bay, Aug. 7, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to inform you that on the morning of the fifth instant, I took my position on the port side of the United States steamer Richmond, as her consort. I was able to open fire but twice; once as the rebel iron-clad Tennessee passed down the line. The second time as we kept away on a north-west course, I was able to bring the ten-inch pivot-gun to bear on Fort Morgan, and the rifled guns to bear on Fort Gaines.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Bancroft Gherardi, Lieutenant Commander. To Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.


Report of Lieutenant Commander C. H. Green.

Mobile Bay, U. S. S. Octorara, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to forward to you the various reports of damages and casualties on board.

I bear cheerful testimony to the good conduct of officers and men; part of the latter volunteered to work one of the Brooklyn's guns, and although I have not yet heard of them from Captain Alden, I have every reason to believe they bore their part well.

To Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Urann, Executive Officer, I am much indebted for his zeal and efforts in having the ship ready to go under fire.

Acting Master Billings, a volunteer from the Vincennes, kept his post faithfully, and though quite severely hurt, still remained.

To Acting Master Young, Acting Ensigns Dodge and McEntee, my thanks are due, for their steadiness and promptness at their quarters.

The Engineer department, under the charge of Mr. Shipman, Acting Chief-Engineer, was well attended to, and his subordinates' conduct met my approbation.

To Assistant-Surgeon Dodge, and Paymaster Pynchon, and in fact all, I tender my hearty thanks.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. H. Green, Lieutenant Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. S. Octorara, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: In obedience to your order of this day, I have the honor to submit the following report of damages done this ship by shot in passing the Fort this morning. They are as follows:

One shot in starboard-bow, entering just in wake of one-hundred pounder rifle; one on portbow abreast of fore-mast; one through each paddle-box, two in foremast, one through smokestack, and one in mainmast, cutting two shrouds of main rigging; one through the gig alongside; one cut one shroud on starboard side; one cut one shroud on port side; one cut pennant-tackle on starboard side; one cut vang falls on starboard side; one struck and carried away awning frame on the stem, and went through ensign; one struck wheel on hurricane-deck; one through boat on davit forward; one cut shroud on port side forward; one shot in forward part of forward guard starboard side; one through foresail.

Ammunition expended: Eight ten-pound charges for one-hundred pounder Parrott, and eight solid shot for one-hundred pounder.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

William D. Urann, A. V. Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Lieutenant Commander C. H. Green.

U. S. S. Octorara, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: In obedience to your order of this day, I have the honor to submit the following report of damages done to the Engineer department of this vessel, during the action of the morning. They are as follows, namely: three shots through the starboard wheel, carrying away a portion of three inner rings and three arms; one shot through the smoke-pipe of boilers, about twenty feet above the hurricane-deck.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

William W. C. Shipman, Acting First Assistant-Engineer in Charge. C. H. Green, Lieutenant Commander.

U. S. S. Octorara, Morile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: The following is the amount of shot and ammunition expended, in passing the Fort this morning.

Eight ten-pound charges for one-hundred pounder rifle; eight shot for one-hundred pounder rifle. Respectfully yours, etc.,

William D. Urann, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant and Executive Officer. To Lieut. Com. C. H. Green.


Report of Lieutenant Commander W. P. McCann.

U. S. S. Kennebec, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to submit the inclosed reports of casualties, injuries sustained, and of ammunition expended on board of this vessel during the action with Forts Morgan and Gaines and the rebel flotilla, and while pursuing the rebel gunboat Morgan toward Dog River Bar.

The officers and crew of the Kennebec performed their duties gallantly under the enemy's fire. When lashed alongside the Monongahela, I sent Acting Ensign J. D. Ellis in charge of a gun's crew, to work a gun there, under the observation of Captain Strong, where he acted nobly.

I beg leave to call your attention to the good conduct of Acting Ensign H. E. Tinkham, who, when seriously wounded by the explosion of a shell from the rebel ram Tennessee, and when the vessel was supposed to be on fire, refused to leave his station. It affords me pleasure to bring to your favorable notice Acting Volunteer Lieutenant [126] Edmund Baker, the Executive Officer, Acting Ensign J. J. Butler and Second Assistant-Engineer L. W. Robinson. Acting Assistant-Surgeon, George W. Hatch rendered the most prompt assistance to the wounded. The crew fully sustained the proud reputation of the American sailor, for courage and bravery.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. P. McCann, Lieutenant Commander, Commanding the Kennebec. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. Gunboat Kennebec, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: The following are the injuries sustained by this vessel in the action of the fifth instant.

One shot on starboard quarter, demolishing mooring chock, and passing through main rail in port side, also injured deck.

A shell from rebel ram Tennessee exploded in ship's side, below spurketing, causing the following damage:

Double iron chain stops broken, horizontal knee-stay torn away, four deck-planks broken and partially blown away, two side-planks broken; water-way and side timber broken, and partially blown away; bulwarks and hammockrail broken; six planks on berth-deck broken; two planks on port-bow injured by collision with ram, which vessel left her boat across our bow, and iron davit on our port anchor.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Edward Baker, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Executive Officer. Lieut. Com. Wm. P. McCann, Commanding U. S. S. Kennebec.

U. S. S. Kennebec, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: The following is the amount of ammunition expended by this vessel in the action of the fifth instant, namely:

Eight eleven-inch shells, twenty-five twenty-pound rifle shells. Powder: Two twenty-pound eleven inch charges; six fifteen-pound eleven-inch charges; twenty-five two-pound charges for rifle; thirty-three cannon-primers. Total rounds, thirty-three.

Very respectfully your obedient servant,

H. E. Tinkham, Acting Ensign in Charge of Ordnance. Lieut. Com. Wm. P. McCann, Commanding U. S. S. Kennebec, Mobile Bay.


Report of Lieutenant Commander George Brown,

U. S. Steamship Itasca, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
Admiral: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this vessel in the engagement of the fifth instant.

In obedience to your orders, this vessel was secured on the port side of the Ossipee, to aid her should she become disabled.

After having passed Fort Morgan, I cast off from the Ossipee, and started under sail and a full head of steam in pursuit of the rebel gunboats Morgan and Selma, that were being engaged by the Metacomet; but before I came within range the Morgan had succeeded in getting in such a position that I could not cut off her retreat toward Fort Morgan, and the Selma had struck her flag to the Metacomet.

I take pleasure in testifying to the spirited willingness and desire manifested by all under my command, to take a more active part in the engagement, but the duty assigned us prevented us from using our guns in passing Fort Morgan, except for the purpose of increasing the density of smoke.

I am happy to be able to report that no casualties occurred.

The vessel was struck once in the mainmast.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

George Brown, Lieutenant Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.


Report of Lieutenant Commander G. H. Perkins.

U. S. Monitor Chickasaw, Mobile Bay, Aug. 7, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to submit the following report:

At six A. M., on Friday, August fifth, in obedience to orders I got under way, and took my position in the rear of the Winnebago, on the right of the line. I passed the forts with the rest of the fleet, firing as rapidly as possible.

Afterward, in obedience to orders, I attacked the rebel ram Tennessee, following her up closely, shooting away her smoke-stack, and firing solid shot at her till her flag was hauled down and a white flag raised. Her steering gear being shot away, I took her in tow and brought her to anchor near the Hartford. In the afternoon of the same day I again got under way, and brought a large barge, the Ingomar, out from under the guns of Fort Powell, exchanging several shot, and being struck three times.

On the morning of the sixth, I proceeded again to Fort Powell, which I found deserted and blown up. I towed out another barge.

In the afternoon I advanced and shelled Fort Gaines.

Too much praise cannot be given to all the officers and men for their coolness and efficiency under fire, and their endurance while at quarters.

I would mention in particular, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant William Hamilton, the executive officer, who, when on his way home, condemned by medical survey, volunteered for this vessel. I owe much to him for his energy in fitting out the vessel, and for his gallantry and coolness during the fight. Acting Master E. D. Percy, who also volunteered for the vessel, and commanded the guns in the after-turret, and gunner John A. McDonald, who commanded the forward turret, deserve especial mention for the skill and rapidity with which they fought their batteries. Chief Boatswain's Mate Andrew Jones, and Master-at-Arms James Seanor, who, although their time was out, volunteered for the fight from the Vincennes, are entitled to honorable mention.

During the entire action the vessel was struck a number of times, the smoke-stack was shot almost entirely away, and one shot penetrated the deck on the starboard bow. No serious injury [127] was suffered, and there were no casualties among officers or men.

I inclose the report of ammunition expended.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. H. Perkins, Lieutenant Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Flag-Ship Hartford.

U. S. Steamship monitor Chickasaw, Aug. 7, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the following expenditures of ordnance and ordnance stores in the engagement of the fifth and sixth of August:

Shell expended upon Fort Morgan: seventy-five five-second; fifteen-pound charges, seventy-five: shot, steel, expended upon ram Tennessee, four; shot, cast-iron, forty-eight; twenty-pound charges fifty-two: shell expended upon Fort Powell, twenty-five five-second; fifteen-pound charges, twenty-five: shell expended upon Fort Gaines, fifteen five-second; sixteen ten-second; fifteen-pound charges, thirty-one; percussion primers expended, one hundred and ninety; lock-strings expended, two; sponges, two; rammers, one.

Very respectfully,

John A. Mcdonald, Gunner. Lieut. Commander G. S. Perkins, Commanding U. S. Steamship Chickasaw.


Report of Lieutenant Charles L. Huntington.

U. S. S. Sloop Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: Commander Mullany having been seriously wounded, it devolves upon me to make a report of the part taken by the Oneida in the engagement with Fort Morgan and the enemy's vessels on the fifth instant.

I have but few data to guide me, Mr. Ebbetts, the Captain's Clerk, having been required below, after Commander Mullany received his wound.

About half-past 3 A. M., our consort, the Galena, came alongside, and we proceeded to lash the ships together.

At ten minutes past four, we got under way in obedience to signal, and took our station in line as per diagram furnished to the commanding officers.

At five minutes past seven A. M., Fort Morgan opened fire, and at fiteen minutes past seven we opened with the thirty-pounder Parrott from our top-gallant forecastle, the Galena also firing with her one-hundred pounder Parrott rifle.

At twenty-five minutes past seven we commenced firing fifteen-second and ten-second shell from the eleven-inch pivot-guns. At forty-five minutes past seven opened with our entire starboard broadside with five-second shell, also firing two-second eleven-inch shrapnel when abreast the Fort. As the Oneida was the sternmost of the line, we had a good opportunity to observe the effects of the grape fired by the vessels ahead, and it appearing to fall in the water, it was determined to use only five-second shell and shrapnel with short fuze.

Fort Morgan fired very vigorously upon us, and sustaining as we did for a while the fire of all its guns, the damages to the ship are very severe. At fifty minutes past seven a seven-inch rifle-shell passed through the chain-armor and the ship's side at the water-line into the starboard boiler, exploding there. Nearly the whole watch below of firemen and coal-heavers were scalded to death, or disabled by the escaping steam. This accident caused only a very temporary excitement on the part of the guns' crews near the fire-room and engine-room hatches, and the guns were gallantly served and fired while the steam was escaping. About this time also a seven-inch rifle-shell entered at the water-line, exploded in the cabin, cutting both wheel-ropes; the relieving tackles were immediately manned and worked very promptly and skilfully under the supervision of Alexander Lowe, Boatswain's Mate.

Observing the enemy's iron-clad ram Tennessee to be approaching us, the guns were ordered to be loaded with increased charge of powder and solid shot. She passed alongside of us not more than two hundred yards distant, attempting to discharge her guns. Fortunately the primers failed to explode the charges in the guns three times, and she only succeeded in giving us one shot, which struck the after eleven-inch pivotgun on the chase.

Both train-tackles and one out-tackle of the forward eleven-inch gun having at this time been shot away, and the carriage of number five eight-inch gun having been disabled, we were only able to fire the after eleven-inch gun. The shot from this gun struck the ram.

The ram passing astern, delivered two raking fires into us, one of which disabled the twelve-pounder howitzer on the poop, severely wounding Commander Mullany; the effect of the other one I am unable to state, but think the only damage from it was to our rigging.

The command of the ship now devolved upon me, and the management of the two vessels upon Lieutenant Commander Wells of the Galena.

The battery was gallantly served while passing the forts, but the enemy raked us several times after our guns could not be brought to bear.

In passing the Fort we received a shell forward on the berth-deck which exploded, knocking out a dead-light on the port side, starting a fire on top of the magazine. Owing to the presence of mind of Acting Ensign Hall, commanding the powder division, and Gunner Wm. Parker, the fire was promptly extinguished, and the supply of powder was as rapid as ever before.

At thirty-five minutes past eight signal was made that the captain was wounded, and also that our boiler was disabled; not being answered from the flag-ship, hauled down signals. About a quarter past nine repeated signals, and they were not answered, but signal was made from the flag-ship to run down at full speed the enemy's principal vessel. Answered the signal, but I am sure the Admiral understands we could not obey it — we had no speed.

At ten o'clock A. M., the Itasca, Lieutenant Commander Brown, took us in tow and carried [128] us to an anchorage. At eleven anchored in three and a quarter fathoms water, with thirty fathoms of chain, ready for slipping.

The officers and crew of the Oneida are proud to have served in your fleet, and they are proud of their gallant commander, J. R. M. Mullany, who gave us all so noble an example of unflinching courage and heroism. His coolness in action could not possibly have been surpassed. Having scarcely become acquainted with Commander Mullany, he having only been on board two days, the highest compliment that can be paid him is the confidence and spirit with which the crew went into action.

Too much praise cannot be awarded to Lieutenant C. S. Cotton, Lieutenant E. N. Kellogg, and Acting Ensign John Sears, commanding gun divisions, for the admirable examples of courage they afforded their men, and for their skill in directing the fire of the guns.

The conduct of Acting Ensign Charles V. Gridley (regular) is beyond all praise. He had charge of the Master's division, and assisted in conning the ship from the top-gallant forecastle.

Acting Ensign Hall's conduct has been previously mentioned. His duties were performed in the most satisfactory manner, and, under the Almighty God, we probably owe to his presence of mind at the time of the fire on the berth-deck the safety of the ship.

Acting Master's Mates Ed. Bird, Daniel Clark, and John Devereaux behaved courageously. Gunner Wm. Parker and Boatswain Hallowell Dickinson merit mention for their good conduct.

I leave it to Chief-Engineer W. H. Hunt to speak of the officers and men under his immediate supervision, but must speak of him personally in this report. He was cool and collected during the whole affair, and his gallantry was particularly apparent at the time of the accident to our starboard boiler. Mr. Hunt was scalded severely in both arms.

Surgeon John F. Taylor had a severe task imposed upon him, but his whole duty by the wounded was done quietly and skilfully. Medical assistance was offered from the Galena; it was accepted, and Acting Assistant-Surgeon George P. Wright came on board, for which we owe him our thanks. At the time that our boiler was exploded, five of our wounded went on board the Galena; four subsequently returned — the other was suffering much pain, and remained on board until transferred to the Metacomet.

The safety of the ship after the explosion depended upon the Galena. That we are here quietly at anchor attests how nobly Lieutenant Commander Clark H. Wells stood by us.

Assistant Paymaster George R. Martin assisted the Surgeon materially. He also superintended putting out a fire that broke out in the cabin. Paymaster's Clerk W. P. Treadwell rendered great service in passing orders to the bell, until he was required below to assist in caring for the wounded. He was quite badly scalded himself. Mr. George A. Ebbetts, Captain's Clerk, behaved splendidly. He was knocked down at the same time that Captain Mullany was wounded. Whenever he could be spared from below after this accident, he cheerfully rendered assistance in carrying orders.

The Pilot, Mr. John V. Grivet, served part of the time on board the Galena, and part of the time on board this ship. That part of his conduct which came under my observation merits praise.

For the crew, they stood to their guns most nobly. Many deserve mention, but I shall only name those that came under my own observation. James Sheridan, Quartermaster, Captain of the after eleven-inch gun, was wounded in several places, but remained at his gun until the firing ceased, when he supplied the place of the Signal Quartermaster, who had been injured by a fall. Sheridan is very intelligent, understands the rudiments of navigation and the use of the sextant, and I recommend him to your favorable notice. John E. Jones, Quartermaster, stationed at the wheel, was also wounded. After the wheel-ropes were shot away he went on the poop to assist at the signals, and remained there until ordered to reeve new wheelropes, Wm. Gardner, seaman, behaved so coolly under fire as to draw my particular attention to him. John Preston, landsman, though severely wounded, remained at his gun until obliged to go to the Surgeon. He reported himself slightly hurt, assisted in taking care of the wounded below, and wanted to return to his station on deck. On examination, it was found that he was wounded quite severely in both eyes. Wm. Newland, O. S., first loader of after eleven-inch gun, behaved splendidly; he has been distinguished on board for his good conduct and faithful discharge of all his duties. David Nailor, landsman, powder-boy at the thirty-pounder Parrott rifle, had his passing-box knocked overboard out of his hand. The passing-box fell into one of the Galena's boats, which was right under our bow; Nailor jumped overboard, recovered his box and returned to his station. Charles Wooram, O. S., acting as an aid to the Executive Officer, distinguished himself by his cool courage; he carried orders intelligently and correctly. Thos. Kendrick, Cox., a volunteer from the Bienville, attracted my attention by his excellent conduct.

The marines conducted themselves with the usual distinguished gallantry of their corps. Sergeant James S. Roantree is particularly deserving of notice.

We are grateful to Almighty God for his protection.

Inclosed are the reports of damages in the different departments of the ship.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Chas. L. Huntington, Lieutenant U. S. Navy. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

[129]

U. S. S. S. Oneida, Mobile Bay, Ala., Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I beg leave to submit the following report of damages sustained in the Engineer's department of this ship, in her passage by Fort Morgan, on the morning of the fifth instant.

A seven-inch Brooke's rifle projectile penetrated the forward out-board end of the starboard boiler, about eight inches above upper tube sheet, carrying away the entire sheet through which it entered; and exploding inside the boiler, inflicted serious damage to the entire forward end of the same, destroying all the angleiron and the fore and aft braces thereto attached, starting the tube-sheets and all the tubes in the two forward tube-boxes. Two of the heaviest fragments of the shell were driven through the front of the boiler, destroying the upper manhole plate, the entire sheet to which it was attached, and starting the riveting of the adjoining sheets.

As soon as it was practicable after this accident, the nature and extent of the damage was ascertained, the connection between the two boilers immediately shut off, and the engines operated with the remaining boiler.

I regret to state that through this accident to the starboard boiler, First Assistant-Engineer R. H. Fitch and six of the firemen and coalheavers on watch below at the time, were seriously scalded by the hot water and escaping steam.

In its present condition the boiler is totally unfit for use. No further damages were sustained in this department. I cannot close this report without adverting to the coolness, zeal, and intrepidity displayed by the officers and men in general under my supervision.

Too much praise cannot be accorded to First Assistant-Engineer R. A. Fitch, who, at the time of the injury to the boiler, displayed the utmost courage and coolness, remaining at his station in the execution of his duties, until he was so badly scalded by the escaping steam as to be rendered almost helpless.

I desire also to refer in terms of the highest commendation to the conduct of Acting Third Assistant-Engineer Nicholas Dillon, who, after the disabling of Mr. Fitch, rendered me invaluable assistance in discovering the nature of damages, and making the requisite provision for working the engines with the remaining boiler.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Wm. H. Hunt, Chief-Engineer. Lieutenant Chas. L. Huntington, Commanding U. S. S. Oneida.

U. S. S. S. Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: The following is a report of the damages in the Master's department of this ship during the action of yesterday, namely:

One set wheel-ropes cut by shell; one telltale compass damaged; one Mobile Bay chart damaged; one spy-glass badly damaged; one binnacle-lamp lost overboard; two ward-room chains broken by shell; one lead and line lost overboard; two sets signal-halliards cut by shell; fifteen fathoms stream-chain on fire-room hatch cut by shot; twelve fathoms starboard bower-chain on ship's side cut by shell; seven fathoms sheet-chain on engine-room hatch cut by shot; all cabin furniture destroyed entirely or badly damaged; one six-inch hawser cut badly.

Very respectfully,

E. W. Kellogg, Lieutenant in charge of Master's Department. Lieutenant C. L. Huntington, Senior Officer on board.

U. S. Ship Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: I respectfully submit the following report of damages and injuries sustained in the gunner's department of this ship in the action of yesterday:

No. 3 gun — forward eleven-inch pivot: one intackle carried away by shot, one out-tackle carried away by shot.

No. 4 gun--eight-inch broadside: one sidetackle carried away by shot, one train-tackle carried away by shot.

No. 5 gun--eight-inch broadside: carriage badly damaged, breast-piece shot away, brackets on left side of carriage badly injured.

Shell-crane and tackle at fore-hatch broken by shot; one rammer knocked overboard; one handspike broken; two boring bits broken; one priming wire broken.

No. 6 gun — after eleven-inch pivot: chase of gun dented and cracked by shot; brackets on right side of carriage badly splintered and dented by expansion band of a shell striking them and remaining in them, fracturing the breeching also, making it unsafe for use; twelve-pounder howitzer boat-carriage disabled.

Very respectfully,

William Parker, Gunner. Lieutenant Chas. L. Huntington, Executive Officer U. S. S. Oneida.

U. S. S. Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864.
sir: I respectfully beg leave to submit the following report of injuries received by this ship in her rigging during the action of this day:

Starboard fore trysail vang shot away; port bowsprit guy shot away; three shrouds of starboard main rigging injured by shot, (one cut in two;) starboard main topmast backstay cut; mizzen-stay shot away; main spencer brail shot away; topping lift of whale boat's davits shot away; awning ridge rope starboard side shot away; spanker brails shot away.

Very respectfully,

Hallowell Dickinson, Boatswain. Lieutenant Chas. L. Huntington, Executive Officer U. S. S. Oneida.

U. S. S. S. Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: The following is a list of casualties in the Carpenter's department of this ship during the engagement of the fifth of August:

All the berths, bulkheads, and furniture in the cabin a total wreck, caused by the explosion of a seven-inch shell which entered at the water-line. One seven-inch rifle-shell passed through [130] the chain-armor and ship's side at the water-line, entered the starboard boiler, and then exploded. One eight-inch solid shot entered the mainmast, doing serious damage, and remains there yet. One shot through ash-shoot, through combings of fire-room, and out through port side.

Fore topmast slightly wounded by piece of shell; spanker-gaff in like manner.

Shot through starboard bow, below spar-deck, across berth-deck, out through port-bow.

Two raking shots from aft struck the top-gallant forecastle, one passing out through starboard bow, one out through port-bow.

First cutter damaged by a pice of shell; second cutter and whale-boat badly smashed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Charles L. Huntington, Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. S. S. Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: The following is a list of casualties in the Sailmaker's department during the engagement of the fifth of August:

Shot-holes in foresail, fore-staysail, and mainsail; spanker badly cut by shot; wind-sails for fire-room and engine-room rendered unfit for use; several shot-holes in hammock-cloths.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Charles L. Huntington, Lieutenant and Senior Officer on Board. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

U. S. S. S. Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: I respectfully submit the following report of the expenditures of ammunition, etc., on board this ship in the action of yesterday:

Four hundred and sixty-five pounds of powder in thirty-one bags of fifteen pounds each; twenty pounds of powder in one bag of twenty pounds; forty-five pounds of powder in five bags of nine pounds each; one hundred and eighty-four pounds of powder in twenty-three bags of eight pounds each; eighty-four pounds of powder in twenty-four bags of three and a half pounds each; two solid shot, eleven-inch; three shrapnel eleven-inch; six shells, eleven-inch, fifteen-second; fourteen shells, eleven-inch, ten-second; seven shells, eleven-inch, five-second; eight shells, eight-inch, ten-second; nine shells, eight-inch, fifteen-second; nine shells, eight-inch, five-second; two solid shot; eight shells, rifle, thirty-pounder, five-second; five shells, rifle, thirty-pounder, ten-second; seven shells, rifle, thirty-pounder, fifteen-second; four shot solid; one shrapnel, twenty-four pounder howitzer; three shrapnel, twelve-pounder howitzer; two canister, twelve-pounder howitzer; sixty cannon-primers; twenty-four friction-primers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

William Parker, Gunner. Lieutenant Chas. L. Huntington, Commanding U. S. S. Oneida.
Forwarded, though I am confident that more shrapnel and less ten-second shell were fired.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

Charles L. Huntington, Lieutenant U. S. Navy.


General orders of rear-admiral Farragut, Nos. 10, 11, 12, and 13.

U. S. Flag-ship Hartford, off Mobile Bay, July 12, 1864.
General order, No. 10:

Strip your vessels and prepare for the conflict. Send down all your superfluous spars and rigging. Trice up or remove the whiskers. Put up the splinter-nets on the starboard side, and barricade the wheel and steersmen with sails and hammocks. Lay chains or sand-bags on the deck over the machinery, to resist a plunging fire. Hang the sheet-chains over the side, or make any other arrangement for security that your ingenuity may suggest. Land your starboard boats, or lower and tow them on the port side, and lower the port-boats down to the water's edge. Place a leadsman and the pilot in the port-quarter boat, or the one most convenient to the Commander.

The vessels will run past the forts in couples, lashed side by side, as hereinafter designated. The flag-ship will lead, and steer from Sand Island N. by E. by compass, until abreast of Fort Morgan; then N. W. half N. until past the Middle Ground; then N. by W.; and the others, as designated in the drawing, will follow in due order, until ordered to anchor; but the bow and quarter-line must be preserved, to give the chaseguns a fair range; and each vessel must be kept astern of the broadside of the next ahead. Each vessel will keep a very little on the starboard quarter of his next ahead, and, when abreast of the Fort, will keep directly astern, and, as we pass the Fort, will take the same distance on the port-quarter of the next ahead, to enable the stern-guns to fire clear of the next vessel astern.

It will be the object of the Admiral to get as close to the Fort as possible before opening fire; the ship, however, will open fire the moment the enemy opens upon us, with their chase and other guns, as fast as they can be brought to bear. Use short fuzes for the shell and shrapnel, and as soon as within three or four hundred yards, give the grape. It is understood that heretofore we have fired too high; but, with grape-shot, it is necessary to elevate a little above the object, as grape will dribble from the muzzle of the gun. If one or more of the vessels be disabled, their partners must carry them through, if possible; but if they cannot, then the next astern must render the required assistance; but as the Admiral contemplates moving with the flood-tide, it will only require sufficient power to keep the crippled vessels in the channel.

Vessels that can, must place guns upon the poop and top-gallant forecastle, and in the tops on the starboard side. Should the enemy fire grape, they will remove the men from the top-gallant forecastle and poop to the guns below, until out of grape-range. [131]

The howitzers must keep up a constant fire from the time they can reach with shrapnel until out of its range.

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, July 29.
General order, No. 11:

Should any vessel be disabled to such a degree that her consort is unable to keep her in her station, she will drop out of line to the westward, and not embarrass the vessels next astern by attempting to regain her station. Should she repair damages so as to be able to reenter the line of battle, she will take her station in the rear as close to the last vessels as possible.

So soon as the vessels have passed the Fort and kept away N. W., they can cast off the gunboats at the discretion of the senior officer of the two vessels, and allow them to proceed up the bay to cut off the enemy's gunboats that may be attempting to escape up to Mobile. There are certain black buoys placed by the enemy from the piles on the west side of the channel across it toward Fort Morgan. It being understood that there are torpedoes and other obstructions between the buoys, the vessels will take care to pass to the eastward of the easternmost buoy, which is clear of all obstructions.

So soon as the vessels arrive opposite the end of the piles, it will be best to stop the propeller of the ship, and let her drift the distance past by her headway and the tide; and those having side-wheel gunboats will continue on by the aid of their paddle-wheels, which are not likely to foul with the enemy's drag-ropes.

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral.

U. S. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
General order, No. 12:

The Admiral returns thanks to the officers and crews of the vessels of the fleet for their gallant conduct during the fight of yesterday.

It has never been his good fortune to see men do their duty with more courage and cheerfulness; for, although they knew that the enemy was prepared with all devilish means for our destruction, and though they witnessed the almost instantaneous annihilation of our gallant companions in the Tecumseh by a torpedo, and the slaughter of their friends, messmates, and gun-mates on our decks, still there were no evidences of hesitation in following their Commanderin-Chief through the line of torpedoes and obstructions, of which we knew nothing, except from the exaggerations of the enemy, who had given out: “That we should all be blown up as certainly as we attempted to enter.”

For this noble and implicit confidence in their leader, he heartily thanks them.

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 7, 1864.
General order, No. 13:

The Admiral desires the fleet to return thanks to Almighty God for the signal victory over the enemy on the morning of the fifth instant.

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.


Letter from rear-admiral Farragut, transmitting additional report of Capt. T. A. Jenkins.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, August 17, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to forward herewith an additional report of Captain Jenkins, in connection with the engagement of the fifth instant, which was not received in time to accompany my detailed despatch No. 343.

Lieutenant Commander Gherardi's conduct is referred to in this report in high terms.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.


Additional report of Captain T. A. Jenkins.

U. S. Steamship Richmond, inside of Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report that in obedience to your General Order and plan of battle for attacking Fort Morgan and the rebel fleet, Lieutenant Commander Bancroft Gherardi, commanding the U. S. steamer Port Royal, reported himself with his vessel to me, ready for action a little before daylight this morning.

The Port Royal was lashed on the port-side of this vessel, with her stern pivot-gun sufficiently far aft of the quarter of this ship to enable it to be used against the enemy as effectively as one of my own broadside guns.

To Lieutenant Commander Gherardi I am greatly indebted for his cool and courageous conduct, from the moment the attack commenced to the time that his vessel was cast off by my order to go in chase of the enemy's three wooden gunboats, the Morgan, Gaines, and Selma.

My orders on board of this ship to the helmsman, and to the officer stationed at the enginebell, were repeated by him on board of his own vessel, and the soundings passed from his vessel to this with a coolness and clearness of voice that could not but excite my admiration.

The after pivot-gun of the Port Royal (the only one that could be brought to bear upon the enemy's batteries from that vessel) was worked most effectively.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Thornton A. Jenkins, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Inside of Mobile Bay.


Letter from rear-admiral Farragut, transmitting report of survey on the rebel ram Tennessee.

flag-ship Hartford, West Gulf blockading Squadron, August 16, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that on the sixth instant I ordered a survey to be made of the hull, armor, etc., of the iron-clad Tennessee, and I herewith submit the report, (order of survey and report marked Nos. 1 and 2,) as well as a sectional view of the vessel made by Second Assistant-Engineer J. De Graff, of this ship, and a drawing in water-colors by [132] Second Assistant-Engineer Robert Weir, of the Richmond.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.


Report of survey on the rebel ram Tennessee.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
gentlemen: You will please make a strict and careful survey on the rebel iron-clad steamer Tennessee, captured in the engagement of yesterday, describing her hull, armor, machinery, armament, ammunition, the injuries to the vessel by shot, and those received when struck by the Monongahela, Lackawanna, and Hartford.

You will also state the repairs necessary to be made to put her again in serviceable condition, and the general internal arrangement of the vessel for light and ventilation, reporting to me in duplicate.

Very respectfully,


U. S. Steam-sloop Richmond, inside of Mobile Bay, August 13, 1864.
sir: In obedience to your order of the sixth instant, hereto appended, we have the honor respectfully to report that we have made a strict and careful survey of the iron-clad casemated steamer Tennessee, captured from the rebels in the engagement in this bay, on the morning of the fifth instant, by the fleet under your command, and submit as follows, namely:

description of Tennessee's hull.

The hull of the vessel appears to be exceedingly strongly built in every part, the material being oak and yellow pine, with iron fastenings. Length from stem to stern on deck, two hundred and nine feet. Greatest breadth of beam on deck, forty-eight feet. Mean average draught of water, about fourteen feet.

The deck is covered fore and aft with wrought-iron plates two inches thick.

The sides of the vessel are protected by an overhang, sponsoned, and covered with two layers of two inch wrought-iron.

This overhang extends about six feet below the water-line.

The sides of the vessel below the deck are believed to be eight feet thick, and the distance from the knuckle, or outside of the overhang on deck, to the base of the casemate on either side is ten feet.

The vessel is provided with a strong beak or prow, which projects about two feet under water, formed by the continuation of the sponsoning, and covered with wrought-iron plates.

casemate.

The casemate of the vessel is very strongly built. It is seventy-eight feet, eight inches long, and twenty-eight feet nine inches wide inside — the sides of the vessel extending ten feet from it on either side, at the greatest breadth of beam.

The framing consists of heavy yellow pine beams, thirteen inches thick, and placed close together vertically. Outside planking of yellow pine, five and a half inches thick, laid on horizontally, and outside of this horizontal planking there is a layer of oak timber four inches thick, bolted on vertically, upon which the iron plating is secured.

The plating or armor of the casemate forward is six inches thick, consisting of three two-inch iron plates, of about six inches wide each, and abaft and on the sides five inches thick, consisting of two two-inch and one one-inch iron-plates of the same width.

The yellow pine framing of the casemate is planked over inside with two and a half inch oak timber laid on diagonally.

The whole of the armor plating is fastened with through-bolts, one and a quarter inch diameter, with washers and nuts inside.

The casemate is covered on top with wrought-iron gratings, composed of bars two inches thick, and six inches wide, laid flat, and supported on wooden beams twelve inches square, and about five feet distant from each other. Some of these gratings are hinged and fitted to open from the inside.

There are ten gun-ports in the casemate--two in broadside, on either side, three forward and three aft.

The forward and after ports, to port and starboard, are placed so as to enable the forward and after pivot-guns to be used as broadside guns. The directly forward and after ports are on a line with the keel.

The ports are elongated and made just wide enough for the entrance of the muzzle of the guns in training, and only high enough to allow a moderate elevation and depression of the gun.

The wooden backing is cut away on each side of the ports inside of the casemate, to allow the guns to be trained about one point forward and aft. The gun-ports are covered with wrought-iron sliding plates or shutters five inches thick; those for the four broadside guns are fitted in slides. The sliding plates or shutters for the pivot-guns are pivoted on the edge, with one bolt that can be knocked out, detaching the shutter, if necessary, and are worked by a combination of racks and pinions.

armament.

The armament of the Tennessee consists of six rifled guns, called by the rebels Brooke's rifles.

The two pivot-guns are seven and one eighth-inch bore, and the four broadside guns are six-inch bore. These guns are reinforced abaft by two wrought-iron bands, two inches thick respectively. Weight of projectiles ninety-five pounds and one hundred and ten pounds solid shot.

The pivot-guns are fitted on wooden slides, [133] with a rack lot into them. On an arm attached to the carriage there is a pinion for running out the gun, and by raising the arm the rack is thrown out of gear to allow the gun to recoil.

The arrangements for working the battery, and the implements and machinery employed, appear to be very good.

quarters for officers and crew.

The cabin is large and comfortable for an iron-clad vessel.

The ward-room is situated immediately over the engine, and is open to it, and although sufficiently commodious, we are of opinion that it would be impossible for officers or others, to preserve their health, or to live there comfortably for any considerable length of time in the absence of a better and more perfect ventilation than is at present provided.

The quarters of the crew are excellent, and exceedingly comfortable for an iron-clad vessel of her description. These quarters consist of a roomy berth-deck, with rooms fitted up on either side for the junior officers.

The berth-deck communicates with the casemate by means of a large hatch, and is provided with two large ventilators through the deck, outside of the casemate.

When in port and in moderately smooth sea, it is believed that the berth-deck will be found to be sufficiently well ventilated to insure a reasonable degree of comfort to the crew; but when the ventilators are unshipped, it is believed that the one blower now on board (and which is also used for forcing the fires) is not sufficient to produce a proper circulation of fresh air.

The steering arrangements appear to be very defective, and the accommodations for the pilot and helmsman bad. These defects can, however, be easily remedied and at a small cost.

machinery.

The machinery of the vessel consists of two geared non-condensing engines.

Cylinders twenty-four inches diameter and seven-feet stroke, with poppet-valves arranged, as is the usual mode on board of western river steamers.

These engines were taken out of the river steamer called the Alonzo Child.

They are placed fore and aft in the vessel, geared to an idler-shaft by spur gearing, with wooden teeth, and from the idler-shaft to the propeller shaft by bevel cast-iron gear

boilers.

There are four horizontal flue-boilers, twenty-four feet long, placed side by side, with one furnace under the whole of them; the products of combustion returning through the flues are delivered into one smoke-pipe.

The engine and fire-rooms are insufferably hot, and very badly ventilated.

injuries received in the action.

The injuries to the casemate of the Tennessee from shot are very considerable. On its after-side nearly all the plating is started; one bolt driven in; several nuts knocked off inside; gun-carriage of the after pivot-gun damaged, and the steering rod or chain cut near that gun. There are unmistakable marks on the afterpart of the casemate of not less than nine eleven-inch solid shot having struck within the space of a few square feet, in the immediate vicinity of that port. On the port side of the casemate the armor is also badly damaged from shot. On that side, nearly amidships of the casemate, and between the two broadside guns, a fifteen-inch solid shot knocked a hole through the armor and backing, leaving on the inside an undetached mass of oak and pine splinters, about three by four feet, and projecting inside of the casemate about two feet from the side. This is the only shot that penetrated the wooden backing of the casemate, although there are numerous places on the inside, giving evidence of the effect of the shot.

There are visible between forty and fifty in dentations and marks of shot on the hull, deck, and casemate, varying from very severe to slight; nine of the deepest indentations on the after part of the casemate, (evidently being eleven-inch shot,) and the marks of about thirty of other calibres on different parts of the vessel.

There are also a few other marks, being, however merely scratches or slight indentations of the plating.

The smoke-stack was shot away, although it is not improbable the heavy ramming by the Monongahela, Lackawanna, and Hartford, had previously prepared it for its fall.

Three of the wrought-iron port shutters or slides were so much damaged by shot as to prevent the firing of the guns.

There are no external visible marks or evidences of injury inflicted upon the hull of the Tennessee by the severe ramming by the Monongahela, Lackawanna, and Hartford; but inasmuch as the decks leak badly, and when there is a moderate sea running in the bay, her reported usual leakage of three inches an hour being now increased to five or six inches an hour, it is fairly to be inferred that the increased leakage is caused by the concussion of the vessels.

The Tennessee is in a state to do good service now.

To restore her to the state of efficiency in which she was when she went into the action with this fleet on the fifth instant, it will be necessary to overhaul much of the iron plating on the port and after sides of the casemate, and replace some of it.

The iron gun-port slides or shutters, which were damaged, must be either removed or repaired.

A new smoke-stack is required and additional ventilators should be fitted.

Blowers are required to produce proper ventilation in the engine-room and on the berth-deck.

When these small repairs and additions shall have been made, the iron-clad Tennessee will be a most formidable vessel for harbor and river service, and for operating generally in smooth water, both offensively and defensively. [134]

The original of this report is accompanied by sectional views of the Tennessee, and a sketch showing the effect of shot on the outside.

We are, very respectfully, your obedient servants,

Thornton A. Jenkins, Captain. James Alden, Captain William E. Leroy, Commander. T. Williamson, Chief-Engineer. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship Hartford.


Letter from rear-admiral Farragut, transmitting additional reports of Captains Drayton, Jenkins, and Marchand.

flag-ship Hartford, W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay, Aug. 22, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to forward herewith the reports of Captain Drayton of the Hartford, Captain Jenkins of the Richmond, and Captain Marchand of the Lackawanna, (marked Nos. 1, 2, and 3,) calling the attention of the Department to such of the petty officers and crew of their respective ships as particularly distinguished themselves in the action of the fifth instant, entitling them to special notice.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.


Additional report of Captain P. Drayton.

flag-ship Hiartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 9, 1864.
sir: I beg leave to call your attention to the conduct of the following petty officers and others of this vessel, during the action of the fifth instant, which I think entitles them to the medal of honor.

1. Thomas Fitzpatrick (Coxswain) was captain of No. 1 gun. His gun was almost disabled by the bursting of a shell, which destroyed much of the material, and killed seven men, besides wounding several others, and among them himself. Notwithstanding this, he had the killed and wounded quietly removed, replaced the breeching, side-tackle and truck, etc., which had been cut to pieces, got a crew, and in a little while was firing the gun again as usual. I recommend that in addition to the medal he be made a Master's Mate.

2. Charles Melville (ordinary seaman.) This man, a loader at the same gun, was severely wounded by a piece of the shell. He was taken below, but would not remain there, and although scarcely able to stand, performed his duty until the end of the action.

3. William E Stanley (shellman at No. 8 gun) was severely wounded, but refused to go below, and continued to perform his duties until at length he became so weak from loss of blood, as to be unable to stand.

4. William Pelham, (landsman.) When the crew of the gun to which he belonged was entirely broken up, owing to the number of its killed and wounded, he assisted to remove the latter below, and then immediately returned, and without any direction to do so, took his place at the adjoining gun, where a vacancy existed, and continued to perform his duties there most faithfully for the remainder of the action.

5. John McFarlan (Captain of Forecastle) was at the wheel, which has been his station in all of the previous fights of this ship. As on every other occasion, he displayed the utmost coolness and intelligence throughout the action. When the Lackawanna ran into us, and for a moment there was every appearance of the men at the wheel being crushed, he never left his station, nor ceased for an instant to attend strictly to his duties. This evidence of coolness and self-possession, together with his good conduct in the other battles of the Hartford, I hope will entitle him to the medal.

6. James R. Garrison (coal-heaver) had one of his great toes shot off; but, without leaving his station at the shell-whip, bound up the wound, and remained at work until again severely wounded.

7. Thomas O'Connell, (coal-heaver.) Although on the sick-list and quite unwell, he went to his station at the shell-whip, where he remained until his right hand was shot away.

8. Wilson Brown (landsman) was stationed at the shell-whip on the berth-deck. A man was killed on the ladder above him, and thrown with such violence against Brown as to knock him into the hold, where he lay for a short time senseless, but, on recovering, he immediately returned to his station, though besides himself only one of the original six belonging there had escaped.

9. John Lamson (landsman) was one of the six men stationed at the shell-whip on the berthdeck; a shell killed or wounded the whole number. Lamson was wounded in the leg, and thrown with great violence against the side of the ship, but as soon as he recovered himself, although begged to go below, he refused, and went back to the shell-whip, where he remained during the action.

10. George Meelage (Paymaster's Steward.) Although quite badly hurt by splinters, refused to leave his station, and performed very efficient service until the end of the action.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. Drayton, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.


Additional report of Captain T. A. Jenkins.

U. S. S. S. Richmond, inside of Mobile Bay, August 10, 1864.
sir: In my report of the fifth instant, I expressed my great admiration of, and thanks for, the cool and courageous conduct of every officer and of every man serving on board of this ship, in the terrible conflict with the rebel batteries at Fort Morgan, the iron-clad Tennessee, and gunboats Selma, Morgan, and Gaines, on the morning of that day.

I consider it, however, but an act of plain and [135] simple duty on my part to go further now, and respectfully invite your attention, and that of the Department through you, to the highly meritorious conduct of the under-mentioned petty officers and seamen on board of this ship, who exhibited on that memorable occasion, and in conflict with the rebels previously, a will and determination, and set an example to their shipmates and messmates, worthy, in my opinion, of the highest commendation.

1. William Densmore (Chief Boatswain's Mate) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He has been in the naval service twelve years, was on board the sloop-of-war St. Louis, blockading off Pensacola and the head of the passes of the Mississippi, until the expiration of his term of service in 1861; reshipped the same year, and joined the Brooklyn; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attacks upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

2. Adam Duncan (Boatswain's Mate) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He has been six years in the naval service; was on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

3. Charles Deakin (Boatswain's Mate) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He deserves special notice for his good example and zeal in going to and remaining at his quarters during the whole action, although quite sick. He has been in the naval service six years; was on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

4. Cornelius Cronan (Chief Quartermaster) is recommended for coolness and close attention to duty in looking out for signals, and steering the ship in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He has been in the naval service eight years. Joined the Brooklyn in December, 1861; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and in the attack on the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

5. William Wells (Quartermaster) is recommended for coolness and close attention to duty as leadsman and lookout, in the action in Mobile Bay, on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. Joined the Brooklyn in September, 1861. Was in the action with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans, and on board of the Brooklyn in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh in 1862. He received two wounds in the left leg, and a severe one in the head, in the engagements with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April twenty-fourth, 1862, the latter causing “opacity of the cornea, and loss of vision of the right eye,” as certified by the Surgeon of the Brooklyn. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

6. Henry Sharp (seaman) is recommended for coolness and courage as captain of one-hundred pounder rifle-gun on top-gallant forecastle, in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He fought his gun when under the hottest fire from the enemy's batteries, at short-range, with a coolness and effectiveness that won not only the admiration of the Commanding Officer of the division, but of all others who had an opportunity to observe him. He has been in the naval service thirty-two years; joined the Richmond at Norfolk when first put in commission, twenty-seventh September, 1860. At the expiration of his term of service in 1863, reshipped for the period of three years. He was in action on board of the Richmond with the rebels at the head of the passes of the Mississippi; at the bombardment of Fort McRea at Pensacola, which lasted an entire day, when he received a severe splinter wound in the left hand which permanently disabled two of his fingers, and notwithstanding the severity of the wound, as soon as it was dressed by the surgeon, he returned to his gun without the permission of the surgeon, and persisted in remaining at his quarters, using his right hand, until the action ceased. He was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and with the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; in action with the Chalmette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; fought the batteries of Vicksburgh twice; was in the memorable attack on Port Hudson on the fourteenth of March, 1863; was captain of a nine-inch gun in the naval nine-inch gun battery, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Edward Terry, placed in rear of Port Hudson during the siege of that place in 1863; he was also captain of a gun in the naval battery established at Baton Rouge, and commanded by Lieutenant Commander Edward Terry, after the repulse of the army and the death of General Williams at that place. [136]

7. Walter E. Smith (ordinary seaman) is recommended for coolness and good conduct at the rifle one-hundred pounder on the top-gallant forecastle, and for musket-firing into the gun-ports of the rebel iron-clad Tennessee in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was on board the United States steamer Hatteras when that vessel was sunk by the piratical vessel commanded by the notorious Semmes off Galveston; joined the Richmond, after having been exchanged, September, 1863; and his conduct on board of the ship has been of the most exemplary kind.

8. George Parks (Captain of Forecastle) is recommended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He joined the Richmond in September, 1860; reshipped October, 1863; was in the actions with Fort McRea; with the rebel vessels at the head of the passes of the Mississippi; in passing Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; twice before Vicksburgh batteries; at Port Hudson; was captain of a gun in the naval nine-inch gun battery at the siege of Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans.

9. Thomas Hayes (Coxswain) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as Captain of No. 1 gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the ironclads and gunboats below New-Orleans; with the Chalmette battery; batteries below Vicksburgh; and was present at the surrender of New-Orleans.

10. Lebbeus Simkins (Coxswain) is recommended for coolness and courage in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He joined the Brooklyn in January, 1861; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; Chalmette batteries; batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New Orleans. Joined the Richmond, October, 1863.

11. Cloff Smith (Coxswain) is recommended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was on board the Richmond in the actions with Fort McRea; at the head of the passes of the Mississippi; with the Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; the Chalmette batteries; twice with the batteries of Vicksburgh in attempting to pass; and at the siege of Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. He has been coxswain on board the Richmond for twenty consecutive months.

12. Alexander H. Truett (Coxswain) is recommended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmette batteries; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; the batteries below Vicksburgh, and was present at the surrender of New-Orleans. He was present at and assisted in the capture of the piratical steamer Miramon, and Marquis de la Habana in March, 1860, near Vera Cruz.

13. Robert Brown (Captain of Top) is recommended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was on board the Westfield in the actions with Fort Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans; also with the batteries at Vicksburgh. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

14. John H. James (Captain of Top) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He came off the sick-list at the commencement of the action, went to his quarters, and fought his gun well during the entire action. He was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; the Chalmettes; the batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond, September, 1863.

15. Thomas Cripps (Quartermaster) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was in the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

16. John Brazell (Quartermaster) is recommended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was in the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

17. James H. Morgan (Captain of Top) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He joined the Colorado in May, 1861; volunteered for the United States steamer Mississippi; was in the action with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans; was on board the Ironsides at Charleston. Joined the Richmond in October, 1863.

18. John Smith, second, (Captain of Top,) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was on board the Varuna when she was sunk by the rebel vessels, after having passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip; was transferred to the Brooklyn; and was in the action with the batteries below Vicksburgh. He joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

19. James B. Chandler (Coxswain) is recommended for coolness and good conduct in the [137] action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of the fifth August, 1864. He deserves special notice for having come off the sick-list and going to and remaining at his quarters during the entire action. Joined the Brooklyn in November, 1861; was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

20. William Jones (Captain of Top) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of the fifth of August, 1864. Joined the Dacotah in September, 1861, and was on board the Cumberland when sunk by the Merrimac at Newport News. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

21. William Doolan (coal-heaver) is recommended for coolness and good conduct, and for refusing to leave his station as shot and shell-passer, after having been knocked down and badly wounded in the head by splinters; and upon going to quarters the second time he was found at his station nobly doing his duty, in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was in Fort Piekens when it was bombarded by the rebels; was on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; the batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans.

22. James Smith, first, (Captain of Forecastle,) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864.

23. Hugh Hamilton (Coxswain) is recommended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. Was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; the batteries below Vicksburgh, present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in October, 1863.

24. James McIntosh (Captain of Top) is recommended for coolness and good conduct in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was present and assisted in the capture of the batteries at Hatteras Inlet, and on board the Cumberland when she was sunk by the Merrimac at Newport News. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863.

25. William M. Carr (Master-at-Arms) is recommended for coolness, energy, and zeal in the action of Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. Volunteered to direct, under the orders of the commander of the division, the passing of shells from the shell-rooms, in addition to his duties connected with the care of lights, which he performed most satisfactorily. Has been Master-at-Arms on board the Richmond since September, 1860; was in the actions with Fort McRea; at the head of the passes of the Mississippi; Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans.

26. Thomas Atkinson (yeoman) is recommended for coolness and energy in supplying the rifle ammunition, which was under his sole charge, in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. He was a petty officer on board the United States frigate Congress with me in 1842-46; was present and assisted in capturing the whole of the Buenos Ayrean fleet by that vessel off Montevideo. Joined the Richmond in September, 1860; was in the actions with Fort McRae; the head of the passes of the Mississippi; Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and at the surrender of New-Orleans.

27. David Sprowls (Orderly Sergeant of marine guard) is recommended for coolness and for setting a good example to the marine guard, working a division of great guns in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. Joined the Richmond September twenty-seventh, 1860; was in the actions with Fort McRae; the head of the passes of the Mississippi; Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. He has been in the service twenty-eight years.

28. Andrew Miller (Sergeant of Marines) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. Was on board the Brooklyn in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans.

29. James Martin (Sergeant of Marines) is recommended for coolness and good conduct as captain of a gun in the action in Mobile Bay on the morning and forenoon of August fifth, 1864. Was in the actions with Forts Jackson and St. Philip; the Chalmettes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; Vicksburgh; Port Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans, on board of the Richmond.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,



Additional report of Captain J. B. Marchand.

U. S. Steam-sloop Lackawanna, Mobile Bay, Aug. 9, 1864.
sir: In the action of the fifth instant the following named petty officers, and others of inferior rating, were conspicuous for their energy and bravery, and deserve medals of honor; but under the fourth rule of the General Order of the Navy Department No. 10, dated April third, [138] 1863, their special signal acts of valor cannot be cited so as to authorize me to recommend their obtaining medals:

1. William Phinney, Boatswain's Mate, as captain of a gun, showed much presence of mind and coolness in managing it, and the great encouragement he gave the crew.

2. John Smith, Captain Forecastle, was first captain of a gun, and finding that he could not sufficiently depress his gun when alongside of the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, threw a hand holystone into one of the ports at a rebel using abusive language against the crew of the ship.

3. Samuel W. Kinnard, landsman, set an example to the crew by his presence of mind and cheerfulness, that had a beneficial effect.

4. Robert Dougherty, landsman, took the place of the powder-boy at his gun without orders when the powder boy was disabled; kept up a supply and showed much zeal in his new capacity.

5. Michael Cassidy, landsman, first sponger of a gun, displayed great coolness and exemplary behavior, eliciting the applause of his officers and of the gun's crew.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. Marchand, Captain. Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. Squadron.

U. S. steam-sloop Lackawanna, Mobile Bay, Aug. 9, 1864.
sir: I respectfully bring to your attention the following petty officers, etc., of this ship who evinced in the battle of the fifth instant signal acts of bravery, which should justly entitle them to medals of honor:

1. George Taylor, Armorer, although wounded, went into the shell-room, and with his hands extinguished the fire from a shell exploded over it by the enemy.

2. Lewis Copat, landsman, remained at his gun after he was severely wounded, until relieved by another person, was then taken below, and after reporting to the Surgeon, returned to his station at the gun, and resumed his duties till the action was over, and was then carried below.

3. James Ward, Quarter-Gunner, being wounded and ordered below, would not go, but rendered much aid at one of the guns when the crew was disabled, and subsequently remained in the chains heaving the lead, until nearly in collision with the rebel iron-clad Tennessee.

4. Daniel Whitfield, Quartermaster, remarkable coolness as captain of a gun in holding on to the lock-string and waiting for some time whilst alongside of the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, and firing that the shot might enter her port.

5. John M. Burns, seaman, severely wounded and sent below under the Surgeon's charge, would not remain unemployed, but assisted the powder division until the action was over.

6. John Edwards, Captain Top, second captain of a gun, although wounded, would not, when ordered, go below to the Surgeon, but took the place of the first captain during the remainder of the battle.

7. Adam McCulloch, seaman, being wounded, would not leave his quarters, although ordered to do so, but remained until the action was over.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. Marchand, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. Squadron.


Capture of Fort Morgan: report of rear-admiral D. G. Farragut.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 23, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to inform the Department that on the evening of the twenty-first instant, General Granger informed me that his batteries would be ready to open on Fort Morgan at daylight the next morning. I accordingly gave directions for the monitors and the vessels with suitable guns, to move up and be ready to open upon it with the army.

I had previously landed four nine-inch guns and placed them in battery, under the command of Lieutenant H. B. Tyson, of the Hartford, and manned them with crews taken from the Hartford, Brooklyn, Richmond, and Lackawanna. They did good service in conjunction with the batteries of the army.

At daylight on the twenty-second the bombardment began from the shore batteries, the monitors and ships inside the bay and outside, and a more magnificent fire I think has rarely been kept up for twenty-four hours.

At half-past 8 P. M., the citadel took fire, and the General ordered the near batteries to redouble their fire. At six this morning an explosion took place in the Fort, and at half-past 6 the white flag was displayed on the Fort. I immediately sent Fleet-Captain Drayton to meet General Granger to arrange the terms for the surrender of the Fort. These were, that the Fort, its garrison, and all public property should be surrendered unconditionally, at two o'clock today, to the army and navy forces of the United States. These terms were agreed to by Brigadier-General Richard L. Page, formerly a commander in the navy.

I shall send the garrison offlcers and men at once to New-Orleans.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral.


Additional report of rear-admiral Farragut.

flag-ship Hartford, W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay, August 25, 1864.
sir: I had the honor, in my despatch No. 366, to report to the Department that Fort Morgan had surrendered on the twenty-third instant to the army and navy, though at the time that despatch was written and mailed the ceremony of surrender had not actually taken place.

The correspondence preliminary to that event is herewith forwarded, (marked Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4,) and the Department will perceive that the terms of capitulation were the same as in. the case of Fort Gaines. General Page endeavored to obtain more favorable terms, but without success. [139]

I regret to state that, after the assembling of the rebel officers at the appointed hour (two P. M.) for the surrender, outside the Fort, it was discovered, on an examination of the interior, that most of the guns were spiked, and many of the gun-carriages wantonly injured, and arms, ammunition, provisions, etc., destroyed, and that there was every reason to believe that this had been done after the white flag had been raised. It was also discovered that General Page and several of his officers had no swords to deliver up, and, further, that some of those which were surrendered had been broken.

The whole conduct of the officers of Fort Gaines and Fort Morgan presents such a striking contrast in moral principle that I cannot fail to remark upon it. Colonel Anderson, who commanded the former, finding himself in a position perfectly untenable, and encumbered with a superfluous number of conscripts, many of whom were mere boys, determined to surrender a fort which he could not defend, and in this determination was supported by all his officers save one; but from the moment he hoisted the white flag he scrupulously kept every thing intact, and in that condition delivered it over; whilst General Page and his officers, with a childish spitefulness, destroyed the guns which they had said they would defend to the last, but which they never defended at all, and threw away or broke those weapons which they had not the manliness to use against their enemies; for Fort Morgan never fired a gun after the commencement of the bombardment, and the advanced pickets of our army were actually on its glacis.

As before stated, the ceremony of surrender took place at two P. M, and that same afternoon all the garrison were sent to New-Orleans in the United States steamers Tennessee and Bienville, where they arrived safely.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.


Letter from Brigadier-General R. L. Page to rear-admiral Farragut and Major-General Granger.

Fort Morgan, August 23, 1864.
Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, U. S. N.; Major-General Gordon Granger, U. S. A., Commanding, etc., etc.:
gentlemen: The further sacrifice of life being unnecessary — my sick and wounded suffering and exposed — humanity demands that I ask for terms of capitulation.

Very respectfully, etc.,

R. L. Page, Brigadier-General C. S. A.


Letter from Major-General Granger to Brigadier-General Page.

headquarters U. S. Forces, Mobile Bay, Aug. 23, 1864.
General: I have notified Admiral Farragut of your desire to capitulate. Until his arrival hostilities will be suspended, when your proposal will be duly considered.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. Granger, Major-General U. S. A., Commanding. To Brigadier-General R. L. Page, Commanding at Fort Morgan.


Letter from Captain P. Drayton and Brigadier General R. Arnold, on the part respectively of rear-admiral Farragut and Major-General Granger to Brigadier-General Page.

headquarters U. S. Forces, Mobile Bay, Aug. 23, 1864.
Brigadier-General R. L. Page, Commanding Fort Morgan:
General: In reply to your communication of this date, received by Captain Taylor, asking for terms of capitulation, we have to say that the only terms we can make are:

First. The unconditional surrender of yourself and the garrison of Fort Morgan, with all of the public property within its limits, and in the same condition that it is now.

Second. The treatment which is in conformity with the customs of the most civilized nations toward prisoners of war.

Third. Private property, with the exception of arms, will be respected.

Very respectfully, your obedient servants,

P. Drayton, Captain U. S. N. On the part of Admiral Farragut, Commanding Naval Forces. R. Arnold, Brigadier-General U. S. A. On the part of General Granger, Commanding United States Forces.


Letter from Brigadier-General Page to Captain P. Drayton and Brigadier-General R. Arnold, Acting on the part, respectively, of Admiral Farragut and General Granger.

Fort Morgan, Aug. 23, 1864.
Captain P. Drayton, U. S. N., Brigadier-General R. Arnold, U. S. A., acting on the part, respectively, of Admiral Farragut and General Granger:
gentlemen: Your conditions in communication of to-day are accepted; but I have still to request that the terms asked with my sick be granted and inserted in the capitulations.

I will be prepared to surrender at two o'clock, and to embark as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, etc.,

R. L. Page, Brigadier-General C. S. A.


Congratulatory letter to rear-admiral Farragut.

Navy Department, Sept. 5, 1864.
sir: Your despatch, numbered 368, is received, informing the Department of the capture, on the twenty-third ultimo, of Fort Morgan. This is the last and most formidable of all the defences erected to command the entrance to the bay of Mobile, and it is a gratification that its capitulation was effected sooner than had been anticipated. I will not, in this communication, stop to comment on the bad faith exhibited in the destruction of the arms and property in the Fort after its surrender, which is reprobated by you with just severity; but I desire to congratulate [140] you and your command on a series of achievements which put us in possession of the bay; and, until the integrity of the Union is fully vindicated and established, close all ocean communication with the city of Mobile. In the success which has attended your operations, you have illustrated the efficiency and irresistible power of a naval force led by a bold and vigorous mind, and the insufficiency of any batteries to prevent the passage of a fleet thus led and commanded. You have, first on the Mississippi, and recently in the bay of Mobile, demonstrated what had been previously doubted, the ability of naval vessels, properly manned and commanded, to set at defiance the best constructed and most heavily armed fortifications. In these successive victories you have encountered great risks, but the results have vindicated the wisdom of your policy, and the daring valor of our officers and seamen.

I desire that the congratulations which are hereby tendered to yourself, your officers and men, may be extended to the army who have so cordially cooperated with you.

Very respectfully,

Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay.


Report of casualties in the fleet in the attack on the defences of Mobile harbor.

Report of rear-admiral D. G. Farragut.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864.
sir: In my despatch number three hundred and thirty-five, written on the evening of the engagement of the fifth instant, the casualties then reported were forty-one killed and eighty-eight wounded.

More detailed reports, since received, make the casualties fifty-two killed and one hundred and seventy wounded, namely:

 Killed.Wounded. 
Hartford,2528 
Brooklyn,1143 
Lackawanna,435 
Oneida,830 
Monongahela,none6 
Metacomet,12 
Ossipee,17 
Richmond,02slightly
Galena,01 
Octorara,110 
Kennebec,16 

I forward herewith the reports of the surgeons of these vessels, giving the names of the killed and wounded, and the character of the wounds.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral, Commanding W. G. Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Hartford.

Killed — Wm. H. Heginbotham, Acting Ensign; Charles Shaefer, ordinary seaman; Wm. Smith, landsman; Louis McLane, seaman; Benjamin Harper, seaman; James B. Osgood, ordinary seaman; Adolphus Pulle, seaman; Thomas Bayne, ordinary seaman; John C. Scott, ordinary seaman; Thomas Stanton, seaman; James Alexander, landsman; Henry Clark, first-class boy; Wm. E. Andrews, Captain After-Guard; Frederick Munsell, landsman; George Walker, landsman; Thomas Wildes, landsman; George Stillwell, nurse; David Morrow, Quarter-Gunner; Peter Duncan, coal-heaver; Andrew E. Smith, coal-heaver; Francis Campbell, second-class fireman; Charles Stevenson, second-class boy; David Curtin, landsman.

Severely Wounded — Wilder Verner, landsman; M. C. Forbes, Captain Top; Michael Fanya, landsman; James S. Geddis, landsman <*> Wm. G. Trask, ordinary seaman; Wm. A. Stanley, seaman; Thomas O'Connell, coal-heaver; James R. Garrison, coal-heaver; E. E. Johnson, first-class boy; George E. Fleke, first-class boy; Charles Dennis, (colored,) landsman; Auguste Simmons, ordinary seaman; William Thompson, first ordinary seaman; Peter Pitts, (colored,) landsman; R. D. Dumphy, coal-heaver; Wm. Doyle, first-class boy; Wm. Eldin, seaman; Walter Lloyd, first-class boy; R. P. Herrick, Acting Master's Mate; Wm. McEwan, Acting Third Assistant-Engineer.

Slightly Wounded — L. P. Adams, Lieutenant; Robert Dixon, Boatswain; William A. Donaldson, seaman; George A. Wightman, landsman; Michael English, second-class fireman; James F. Brown, landsman; James Anderson, seaman; Stephen H. Jackson, first-class boy.

Killed, twenty-three; wounded severely and transferred to hospital at Pensacola, twenty; wounded slightly, remaining on board, eight. Total, fifty-one.

Respectfully,

P. Lansdale, Surgeon. To Captain P. Drayton, United States Navy, Commanding United States Steamer Hartford, Mobile Bay.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Brooklyn.

U. S. S. Brooklyn, in the Bay of Mobile, August 6, 1864.
sir: In addition to the list of casualties resulting from the action of the rebel forts and fleet yesterday, I have to report thirteen more to-day, some of which were overlooked in the haste of making out the list, and others failed to report themselves. You will observe this addition of thirteen to the list of wounded makes a total of fifty-four instead of forty-three, the number reported yesterday.

I also submit the name, rate, and remarks in each case.

Killed — William H. Cook, Acting Master's Mate, splinter-wound of both legs and thighs, the left hand carried away; Eli Harwood, Captain's cook, left shoulder and arm badly lacerated; John Ryan, landsman, left half of head carried away; Charles B. Seymour, seaman, upper half of head carried away; Thomas Williams, seaman, spine and ribs carried away; Lewis Richards, [141] seaman, back part of chest and head carried away; Michael Murphy, private marine, right leg and half of the pelvis carried away; William Smith, private marine, struck by a shot and knocked overboard; Richard Burke, coal-heaver, back part of chest carried away, and compound fracture of left leg; Anthony Dunn, first-class fireman, abdomen and chest opened by shell; James McDermott, landsman, left side of abdomen carried away.

Wounded — Charles F. Blake, Lieutenant, flesh-wound of right leg, slight; Douglass R. Cassell, Acting Ensign, (in regular navy,) wound of scalp, slight; Daniel C. Brayton, sailmaker, contusion of right fore-arm, severe; Abraham L. Stephens, Acting Master's Mate, wound of face, slight; Alexander Mack, Captain Maintop, compound fracture of left hand, severe; Patrick Brierton, landsman, wound in right arm, severe; Francis Prior, ordinary seaman, compound fracture of rib, wound of scalp, dangerous; Rufus Brittell, landsman, left eye destroyed, severe; Patrick Duggin, landsman, fracture of left leg, severe; John McPherson, seaman, scalp-wound and contusions, severe; John Dunn, coal-heaver, left eye destroyed, severe; Charles Steinbeck, ordinary seaman, fracture of skull, severe; Daniel McCarthy, landsman, compound fracture of scapula, severe; George W. Hersey, seaman, flesh-wound over hip, severe; Wm. H. Harrison, ordinary seaman, flesh wound in right arm, severe; Thomas Dennison, landsman, wounded over left eye, severe; Frank Hanson, seaman, contusion of both eyes, severe; Alvin A. Carter, ordinary seaman, fracture of right thigh, severe; George R. Leland, private marine, bolt driven into left thigh, severe.

William McCaffrey, seaman, wound over right eye, slight; John Bryant, Armorer's Mate, scalp wound, slight; Roland M. Clark, ordinary seaman, flesh wound in left fore-arm, slight; William Brown, landsman, splinter-wounds in thigh and shoulder, slight; Charles Miner, landsman, contusion of shoulder, slight; Lewis Hareck, ordinary seaman, contusion of right arm and chest, slight; Alexander Degges, landsman, abrasion, slight; Frank Bennett, first-class boy, contusion, slight; Bernard Brown, ordinary seaman, scalp-wound, slight; William Robinson, Captain Foretop, contusion, slight; John Thompson, ordinary seaman, contusion, slight; William H. Brown, landsman, contusion and abrasion, slight; Barclay Redington, coal-heaver, scalp-wound, slight; John K. House, coal-heaver, contusion and abrasion, slight; William Frick, ordinary seaman, abrasion of side and thigh, slight; John Maxwell, coal-heaver, scalp-wounds, slight; James Sterling, coal-heaver, contusion of side, slight; John McKennon, ordinary seaman, contusion, slight; Benjamin K. Taylor, landsman, contusion, slight; Isaac B. Larett, seaman, contusion, slight; and James Shea, Quarter-Gunner, contusion, slight. All these wounds were slight.

Patrick McGowan, coal-heaver, wound of left elbow, severe; Joseph Machon, first-class boy, splinter-wound and contusion, severe; William McCarren, landsman, contusion of left eye, severe.

Killed, eleven; wounded, forty-three. Total, fifty-four.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

George Maulsby, Surgeon. Captain J. Alden, Commanding U. S. Steamer Brooklyn.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Lackawanna.

United States steam-sloop Lackawanna, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the following list of casualties which have occurred in the action of this day, while passing the forts, and occupying Mobile Bay:

Killed — James Williams, Master-at-Arms; John Troy, Captain Forecastle; Charles Anderson, ordinary seaman; Richard Ashley, colored boy,

Wounded--Lieutenant Stephen A. McCarty, splinter-wound of ankle, slight; Ensign Clarence Rathbone, splinter-wound of knee, slight; Charles Hayden, yeoman, fracture of right leg, serious; John Burns, seaman, splinter-wound of arm and back, severe; James Ward, Quarter-Gunner, splinter-wound of back, slight; Frederick Stewart, officers' cook, shell-wound of head, severe; Edward Harris, seaman, splinter-wound of head, slight; John Bengsten, seaman, splinter-wound of wrist, slight; Anten Lewis, seaman, splinter-wound of knee, slight; Adam McCullock, seaman, splinter-wound of leg, slight; S. H. Eldridge, Quartermaster, splinter-wound of face; John Edwards, seaman, splinter-wound of face and arm, severe; John Lear, ordinary seaman, splinter-wound of shoulder and hand; Francis Burns, ordinary seaman, splinter-wound of back; R. O. Seaver, ordinary seaman, splinter-wound of both legs, slight; Dennis Muellen, landsman, splinter-wound of back, slight; James D. Atkinson, landsman, splinter-wound of arm, slight; John Maline, landsman, fracture of clavicle; John Acker, landsman, splinter-wound of back, slight; Jesse Sweet, landsman, splinter-wound of thigh, severe; John Gallagher, landsman, splinter-wound of leg, slight; Louis Copat, landsman, splinter-wound of face and limbs, severe; Theo. Fletcher, landsman, shell-wound of face, with concussion, severe; Alexander Fivey, landsman, shell-wound of head, back, and leg, serious; James McCauley, landsman, left thigh torn off, mortally; Silas M. Stevens, landsman, splinter-wound of head, severe; Richard McCay, boy, splinter-wound of arm, slight; George Taylor, armorer, shell-wound of forehead, slight; Patrick Morrissey, first-class fireman, splinter-wound in ankle, slight; Isaac Hewsom, coal-heaver, (colored,) splinter-wound of leg, slight; Jacob Maggett, coal-heaver, (colored,) splinter-wound of leg, slight; Andrew Achum, second-class fireman, shell-wound of face, slight; James Keefe, marine, splinter-wound of thigh, severe; Frederick Hines, marine, shell-wound of head, serious; D. F. Pratt, private signal [142] corps United States army, fracture of left fore-arm.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. W. Leach, Surgeon U. S. Navy. Captain J. B. Marchand, Commanding United States Ship Lackawanna.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Oneida.

United States steamer Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864.
sir: I have to report the following casualties, which occurred to-day on board this vessel while passing Fort Morgan, and during an engagement with the fleet of the enemy.

Killed — Frank Levay, ordinary seaman; Thomas Gibson, marine; Albert Phillips, Captain Forecastle; John C. Jensen, seaman; James Agern, first-class fireman, scalded; Emanuel Boyakin, cabin steward; Robert Lenox, landsman; Patrick Dorris, landsman, missing, killed or drowned.

Wounded severely — J. R. M. Mullany, commander, left arm amputated; R. H. Fitch, First Assistant-Engineer, scalded; Oliver Crommelia, Surgeon's Steward, scalded; John Peacock, first-class fireman; scalded; William Mitchell, landsman, scalded; John Nelson, landsman, scalded; William Ager, coal-heaver, scalded; William Burtis, first-class fireman, scalded; Samuel Vanasery, coal-heaver, scalded; William New-land, ordinary seaman, flesh-wound; John Preston, landsman, eyes; Charles Matthews, landsman.

Wounded slightly — William H. Hunt, Chief-Engineer, scalded; George A. Ebbets, Captain's Clerk, contusion; William P. Treadwell, Paymaster's Clerk, scalded; Peter McKeloye, second-class fireman, scalded; Stephen Dolan, first-class fireman, scalded; John Boyle, coal-heaver, scalded; Moses Jones, coal-heaver, scalded; John Ralton, landsman, scalded; Edward Thomas, ordinary seaman, scalded; James Sheridan, Quartermaster, contusion; John E. Jones, Quartermaster, contusion; Henry Binney, Quartermaster, contusion; Francis Brown, Quarter-Gunner, contusion; Christian Christeinick, landsman; Roger Sharman, landsman; John Johnson, ordinary seaman; David Johnston, Corporal Marines; John Kilroy, private marine. Killed, eight; wounded severely, twelve; wounded slightly, eighteen.

Very respectfully,

John Y. Taylor, Surgeon. Lieutenant C. L. Huntington, U. S. N., Commanding U. S. S. Oneida.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Monongahela.

United States steamer Monongahela, Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864.
sir: The following are the casualties on board this ship, resulting from the action to-day with Forts Morgan and Gaines and the rebel rams:

Roderick Prentiss, Lieutenant, both legs badly injured by splinters, left one amputated; Michael Smith, boy, severe lacerated wound of scalp by splinters; William Feeney, Paymaster, contusion of back and left arm, slight; Holbert Lane, Surgeon's Steward, wound of scalp, splinter, slight; James Johnston, landsman, wound of head, splinter, not dangerous; Richard Condon, landsman, wound of back, splinter, slight.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

David Kondleberger, Surgeon United States Navy. Commander James H. Strong, U. S. N., Commanding United States Steamer Monongahela.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Metacomet.

U. S. S. Metacomet, West Gulf blockading Squadron, Mobile Bay, August 8, 1864.
sir: I have to report that on the morning of the fifth instant, during the engagement while passing the forts, and engaging the gunboats, the following casualties occurred:

John Stewart, landsman, killed, Julian J. Butler, ordinary seaman, shell-wound; Oliver D. Wolfe. fireman, slightly wounded.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. Payne, Assistant Surgeon. Lieut Com. Jas. E. Jouett, Commanding.


Report of the casualties on the U. S. S. Ossipee.

United States steam sloop Ossipee, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the following casualties on board this ship during the engagement of this day with the enemy's batteries on shore and afloat:

Lewis Lord, landsman, nape of neck, dangerous; Owen Maines, seaman, fore-arm broken, shoulder-joint, head, and hip contused, since died of wounds, killed; John Harris, Quarter-Gunner, gunshot wound in lower jaw, serious; Thomas Rogers, landsman, contusion of right leg, slight, Henry Johnson, ordinary seaman, splinter-wound, slight; James Sweeney, seaman, splinter-wound, slight; George Rowe, second-class fireman, splinter-wound, slight; Sam Hazard, landsman, splinter-wound, slight.

Total, one killed, seven wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. Gibbs, Surgeon. Commander W. E. Le Roy, Commanding U. S. Steam Sloop Ossipee, Mobile Bay.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Galena.

United States steamer Galena, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I would most respectfully report the following casualty on board this vessel while passing Fort Morgan:

Wounded — James McCafferty, coal-heaver, scalp-wound, with concussion of the brain.

Very respectfully,

Geo. P. Wright, Acting Assistant-Surgeon, United States Navy. To Lieut. Com. C. H. Wells, U. S. Navy, Commanding United States Steamer Galena.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Octorara.

U. S. S. Octorara, Mobile, Ala., Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have to report the following as a list of casualties occurring this morning, while passing Forts Morgan and Gaines, namely:

Killed — W. H. Davis, seaman, by splinters. [143]

Wounded--Lieutenant Commanding C. H. Green, contusion of leg; Acting Ensign Maurice McEntree, contusion of the thigh; Acting Master Henry R. Billings, contusion of face, all from splinters, slight; James McIntosh, Coxswain, incised wound of scalp, not severe; John Govard, seaman, lacerated wound of forehead, quite severe; Charles Howard, seaman, contusion of sacrum, slight; William H. Nice, Boatswain's Mate, severe contusion of right eye; Andrew Crough, Quartermaster, contusion of scalp, slight; George Smith, ship's corporal, wound of upper third left arm, quite severe; John Robinson, quartermaster, contusion of left foot, slight.

Killed, one; wounded, ten.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Edward R. Dodge, Assistant Surgeon U. S. Navy. Lieut. Com. C. H. Green, Commanding U. S. Octorara.


Report of casualties on the U. S. S. Kennebec.

U. S. S. Kennebec, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I respectfully report the following casualties in action yesterday morning, while passing Fort Morgan, namely:

Daniel Godfrey, coal-heaver, mortally wounded in abdomen, by fragment of shell from the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, and has since died; Acting Ensign H. E. Tinkham, serious gunshot wounds, and contusions of left, arm, side, thigh, and leg, by fragments of shell from the rebel ram Tennessee, no fracture; Peter R. Post, landsman, gunshot wound and fracture of right cheek-bone, serious; Charles Sanders, Master-at-Arms, slight contusion of lips; J. D. Ireson, Captain of the Hold, Isaac Fisher, (colored,) first-class boy, and several others, very slight contusions, by fragments of shell from the Tennessee, and splinters caused by it; and Kimball Prince, landsman, contusion of right shoulder, slight, by splinter caused by a solid shot from the Fort.

Very respectfully,

George W. Hatch, Acting Assistant-Surgeon, United States Navy. Lieut. Com. W. P. Mccann, U. S. N., Commanding United States Steamer Kennebec.


Loss of the U. S. Steamer Philippi: report of rear-admiral D. G. Farragut.

flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864.
sir: I regret to inform the Department, that after I had passed the forts some time, I saw a steamer on fire inside the bay. I soon perceived that it was the Philippi, and I could not imagine how she came to be set on fire.

I have since received the report of her commanding officer, Acting Master J. T. Seaver, which is herewith inclosed:

The facts appear to be, that Acting Master Seaver, on the evening before the action, asked Fleet-Captain Drayton if he should not follow the squadron into the bay. Captain Drayton told him that that would be a folly, and ordered him to go and deliver the ammunition he had brought from Pensacola, on board the Tennessee, and then report to Lieutenant Commander Grafton, senior officer for duty outside. Instead of doing this, he followed the fleet in, and was struck with a shot from the Fort, when he put his helm a-port and ran her on the bank. After having had two men killed and two wounded, he deserted the vessel, leaving his signal-book (boat code,) on the quarter-deck, where it was found by the enemy, who subsequently boarded the vessel.

. . . . . . .

The rebels set the vessel on fire, and we have thus lost one of the most efficient vessels in the squadron for all kinds of express duty, and we are sadly in want of just such vessels.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral Commanding W. G. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.


Report of Acting Master James T. Seaver.

U. S. S. Cowslip, August 6, 1864.
sir: I beg leave to make the following report to you in regard to the loss of the U. S. steamer Philippi:

At daylight, hove up anchor, and steamed alongside the Tennessee, and discharged all the ordnance stores and provisions belonging to other vessels; not having orders to report to any one, and the verbal order I received being to discharge the stores into the Tennessee as quickly as possible, I did so. Wishing to be of assistance to the fleet in case any vessels were disabled, and knowing the power of my steamer, immediately after the freight was out, I dropped off from the Tennessee, got hawsers, lines, etc., all ready to be of assistance in towing any disabled vessel which would need my services. At forty-five minutes past seven stood up the channel for the fleet, keeping as far out of range of the Fort as I could judge was necessary to clear the shoal, the Quartermaster at the lead from the time of making the bar. At about fifteen minutes past nine, while going ahead slow, the Quartermaster gave the cast, a quarter less three, and the steamer immediately struck. I rang three bells and tried to back her off, but she did not stir. I kept backing for ten minutes; had about thirty-five pounds of steam on. The Fort then opened fire on us, and, getting our range, every other shell did execution — the second shell or shot, (as it did not explode, I could not tell which,) struck the rail about the starboard bow-port, and immediately killed Frank Wilson, landsman. One shot passed through the boiler, entirely disabling us, and another burst in the engine-room. At this time Fort Morgan kept up a constant fire at us, every shell doing more or less execution. The men, while I was forward, many of them, rushed aft, and commenced cutting the boats' falls. Hearing this, I came aft and ordered them to stop, which they did, and the boats were lowered with safety, but the men crowded in, and two of the boats were immediately filled. I put the wounded in one of the boats, and sent the dying in charge of Acting Ensign L. R. Vance, to the Cowslip, for assistance. [144]

The deck being full of steam and smoke, and indications of the ship being on fire, and two of my men being wounded and one scalded, and almost every shell, either direct or ricochet, striking the steamer, and the boilers being disabled, and my men, several of them being almost paralyzed with fear; also, the sight of the rebel steamer coming out, and the utter impossibility to save the steamer or resist the enemy, I judged it best to abandon her.

I pulled alongside the Cowslip and Buckthorn, the two vessels being close to each other, and put the wounded on board; both vessels then stood toward the Genesee. I went on board, and reported to Captain Grafton; was ordered to put the wounded on board the Tennessee and report to Captain Grafton again, but as the Genesee steamed toward Pelican Channel, I was forced to remain on the Tennessee. The Quartermaster, William H. French, who was wounded in the stomach, died at twenty minutes past seven.

List of Casualties — Frank Wilson, landsman, killed; William H. French, Quartermaster, mortally wounded; John Collins, coal-heaver, scalded; and Joseph Boyd, slightly wounded.

The officers were perfectly cool throughout the time while under fire, and in leaving the ship.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

James T. Seaver, Acting Master. To Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) (146)
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (77)
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (42)
Fort Jackson (Louisiana, United States) (26)
Buras (Louisiana, United States) (25)
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (24)
United States (United States) (22)
Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (19)
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (12)
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (10)
Washington (United States) (8)
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (6)
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (5)
Dauphin Island (Alabama, United States) (4)
Enfield (Massachusetts, United States) (3)
Brooklyn (New York, United States) (3)
Tennessee River (United States) (2)
Oneida (N. Y.) (New York, United States) (2)
McDuffie Island (Alabama, United States) (2)
Manhattan, Riley County, Kansas (Kansas, United States) (2)
Fort McRae (Florida, United States) (2)
Vera Cruz, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (1)
Tecumseh (Michigan, United States) (1)
St. Phillip (Indiana, United States) (1)
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (1)
Selma (Alabama, United States) (1)
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (1)
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (1)
Montevideo (Virginia, United States) (1)
Kennebec (Maine, United States) (1)
Galveston (Texas, United States) (1)
Galena (Illinois, United States) (1)
Dog River (Alabama, United States) (1)
Charleston, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (1)
Charles Lake (Virginia, United States) (1)
Cedar Point (North Carolina, United States) (1)
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (1)

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide People (automatically extracted)
Sort people alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a person to search for him/her in this document.
David G. Farragut (65)
Richard L. Page (18)
Percival Drayton (17)
D. G. Farragut (16)
Thornton A. Jenkins (15)
J. B. Marchand (14)
Charles L. Huntington (12)
G. Granger (12)
J. R. M. Mullany (10)
James Alden (10)
Gideon Welles (9)
Parrott (9)
C. H. Green (8)
F. Buchanan (8)
William E. Roy (7)
L. A. Kimberly (7)
Gordon Granger (7)
C. D. Anderson (7)
J. W. A. Nicholson (6)
Bancroft Gherardi (6)
P. Drayton (6)
Edward Donaldson (6)
Thomas Williamson (5)
Clark H. Wells (5)
T. H. Stevens (5)
G. H. Perkins (5)
William P. McCann (5)
Forecastle (5)
A. R. Yates (4)
William Parker (4)
R. L. Page (4)
I. E. Jouett (4)
Robert Dixon (4)
William H. Brown (4)
George Brown (4)
Richard Arnold (4)
George P. Wright (3)
W. H. Whiting (3)
I. Crittenden Watson (3)
William D. Urann (3)
Herbert B. Tyson (3)
H. E. Tinkham (3)
George Taylor (3)
James H. Strong (3)
J. H. Strong (3)
James Sheridan (3)
James T. Seaver (3)
William E. Le Roy (3)
Thomas O'Connell (3)
P. N. Murphy (3)
John Morgan (3)
Monongahela (3)
Charles Melville (3)
William McEwan (3)
Alexander Mack (3)
James E. Jouett (3)
T. A. Jenkins (3)
William H. Hunt (3)
R. P. Herrick (3)
William H. Heginbotham (3)
W. H. Heginbotham (3)
Grafton (3)
James R. Garrison (3)
Thomas Fitzpatrick (3)
William H. Cook (3)
Carpenter (3)
Canby (3)
Daniel C. Brayton (3)
Bogart (3)
Charles F. Blake (3)
La Rue P. Adams (3)
Frank Wilson (2)
C. H. Wells (2)
James Ward (2)
Utter (2)
William P. Treadwell (2)
Top (2)
Samuel Todd (2)
Edward Terry (2)
Commander J. H. Strong (2)
James E. Sterling (2)
John L. Staples (2)
William M. Smith (2)
William Smith (2)
Michael Smith (2)
John Smith (2)
James Smith (2)
William W. C. Shipman (2)
C. M. Schoonmaker (2)
W. E. Le Roy (2)
William Robinson (2)
John Queredo (2)
Edward Price (2)
John Preston (2)
Roderick Prentiss (2)
R. Prentiss (2)
E. D. Payne (2)
John M. Palmer (2)
Miles M. Oriatt (2)
U. S. Octorara (2)
North (2)
Henry C. Nields (2)
I. W. A. Nicholson (2)
William Nichols (2)
John Nelson (2)
David Nailor (2)
Myer (2)
I. R. M. Mullany (2)
James H. Morgan (2)
Charles Miner (2)
James Mifflin (2)
James McIntosh (2)
John A. McDonald (2)
George Maulsby (2)
William Madden (2)
James Machon (2)
Edward P. Lull (2)
Edward O. Lull (2)
E. P. Lull (2)
P. Lansdale (2)
John Lamson (2)
James Lamen (2)
Barnett Kenna (2)
John E. Jones (2)
Joe Johnston (2)
Nicholas Irwin (2)
John Irwin (2)
Joseph Irlane (2)
Michael Hudson (2)
George W. Hatch (2)
William Hamilton (2)
William Halsted (2)
R. M. Hall (2)
Gaines (2)
William H. French (2)
M. C. Forbes (2)
R. H. Fitch (2)
R. A. Fitch (2)
William Feeney (2)
J. D. Ellis (2)
John Edwards (2)
George A. Ebbetts (2)
Peter Duncan (2)
Isaac J. Dodge (2)
Hallowell Dickinson (2)
Richard Dennis (2)
J. Henry Dennig (2)
Samuel H. Davis (2)
William Starr Dana (2)
T. A. M. Craven (2)
John Cooper (2)
Henry Clark (2)
Julian J. Butler (2)
Wilson Brown (2)
Joseph Brown (2)
John Brown (2)
William Blagden (2)
Henry R. Billings (2)
Edmund Baker (2)
James Anderson (2)
John B. Zellick (1)
J. R. Young (1)
William H. Wroten (1)
William H. Wright (1)
Henry Wright (1)
Charles Wooram (1)
James Wood (1)
Oliver D. Wolfe (1)
G. E. Wing (1)
Lieutenant C. W. Wilson (1)
Thomas Williams (1)
Rebecca Williams (1)
James Williams (1)
Henry Williams (1)
Thomas Wildes (1)
George A. Wightman (1)
Daniel Whitfield (1)
John White (1)
James W. Whiittaker (1)
William West (1)
William Wells (1)
Robert Weir (1)
Weecker (1)
John Wallington (1)
Thomas Walkley (1)
George Walker (1)
G. H. Wadleigh (1)
Wilder Verner (1)
L. R. Vance (1)
Samuel Vanasery (1)
J. M. Tuttle (1)
Alexander H. Truett (1)
John Troy (1)
John B. Trott (1)
Trice (1)
William G. Trask (1)
J. J. Tinelli (1)
William Tidder (1)
William Thompson (1)
John Thompson (1)
R. G. Thomas (1)
Edward Thomas (1)
Tecumseh (1)
John Y. Taylor (1)
John F. Taylor (1)
Benjamin K. Taylor (1)
James Sweeney (1)
Thomas L. Swann (1)
George Stillwell (1)
John Stewart (1)
Frederick Stewart (1)
Charles Stevenson (1)
Thomas Stevens (1)
Silas M. Stevens (1)
James Sterling (1)
Abraham L. Stephens (1)
Charles Steinbeck (1)
Thomas Stanton (1)
William E. Stanley (1)
William A. Stanley (1)
William Stanley (1)
Peter W. Stanley (1)
Francis A. Stanley (1)
David Sprowls (1)
Walter E. Smith (1)
George Smith (1)
Cloff Smith (1)
Andrew E. Smith (1)
Henry P. Sleeper (1)
H. T. Sleeper (1)
Auguste Simmons (1)
Lebbeus Simkins (1)
Sigsbee (1)
Robert Sherman (1)
James Shea (1)
Roger Sharman (1)
W. T. Shankland (1)
Charles Shaefer (1)
Charles B. Seymour (1)
Sergeant (1)
R. O. Seaver (1)
J. T. Seaver (1)
John Sears (1)
James Seanor (1)
John C. Scott (1)
Scot (1)
Charles Sanders (1)
John Ryan (1)
George Rowe (1)
Thomas Rogers (1)
L. W. Robinson (1)
John Robinson (1)
William Roberts (1)
James S. Roantree (1)
Lewis Richards (1)
Barclay Redington (1)
James Reddington (1)
Clarence Rathbone (1)
John Ralton (1)
Pynchon (1)
John Purdy (1)
Adolphus Pulle (1)
Kimball Prince (1)
D. F. Pratt (1)
Peter R. Post (1)
Peter Pitts (1)
Pinto (1)
William Phinney (1)
Albert Phillips (1)
Joseph Perry (1)
G. S. Perkins (1)
E. D. Percy (1)
George H. Pendleton (1)
William Pelham (1)
Pease (1)
John Peacock (1)
Augustus Pauly (1)
George Parks (1)
Charles Packand (1)
James B. Osgood (1)
William H. Nice (1)
William Newland (1)
Michael Murphy (1)
Frederick Munsell (1)
George Mundy (1)
Dennis Muellen (1)
Lesley G. Morrow (1)
David Morrow (1)
Patrick Morrissey (1)
William Mitchell (1)
Andrew Milne (1)
H. O. Miller (1)
Andrew Miller (1)
George Meelage (1)
John McPherson (1)
Louis McLane (1)
McKinley (1)
John McKennon (1)
Peter McKeloye (1)
Patrick McGowan (1)
John McFarland (1)
John McFarlan (1)
Samuel McFall (1)
William G. McEwan (1)
Maurice McEntree (1)
McEntee (1)
James McDonald (1)
James McDermott (1)
Felix McCurley (1)
Adam McCullock (1)
Adam McCulloch (1)
Richard McCay (1)
James McCauley (1)
Stephen A. McCarty (1)
S. A. McCarty (1)
Daniel McCarthy (1)
William McCarren (1)
W. P. McCann (1)
William McCaffrey (1)
James McCafferty (1)
John Maxwell (1)
Charles Matthews (1)
James Martin (1)
George R. Martin (1)
Marthow (1)
Marines (1)
John Maline (1)
George Major (1)
Maintop (1)
Owen Maines (1)
Jacob Maggett (1)
Joseph Machon (1)
Alexander Lowe (1)
Lewis Lord (1)
Walter Lloyd (1)
A. V. Lieutenant (1)
Anten Lewis (1)
Frank Levay (1)
William E. LeRoy (1)
Robert Lenox (1)
George R. Leland (1)
John Lear (1)
T. W. Leach (1)
Christopher Lawrence (1)
Isaac B. Larett (1)
G. T. Kutz (1)
Krafft (1)
David Kondleberger (1)
Kitchen (1)
Samuel W. Kinnard (1)
James G. King (1)
David Kindleberger (1)
John Kilroy (1)
Thomas Kendrick (1)
Thomas Kelly (1)
D. C. Kells (1)
E. W. Kellogg (1)
E. N. Kellogg (1)
A. H. Kellogg (1)
James Keefe (1)
William Jones (1)
Moses Jones (1)
Andrew Jones (1)
James Johnston (1)
David Johnston (1)
John Johnson (1)
Henry Johnson (1)
E. E. Johnson (1)
John C. Jensen (1)
John H. James (1)
Horace James (1)
Stephen H. Jackson (1)
J. D. Ireson (1)
Ingersoll (1)
W. H. Hunt (1)
J. A. Howell (1)
Charles Howard (1)
Houston (1)
John K. House (1)
Hotchkiss (1)
Owen Holland (1)
Frederick Hines (1)
Charles Heywood (1)
Isaac Hewsom (1)
George W. Hersey (1)
T. C. Herbert (1)
F. C. Herbert (1)
Henrick (1)
Sam Hazard (1)
Thomas Hayes (1)
Charles Hayden (1)
Eli Harwood (1)
Hartford (1)
William H. Harrison (1)
John Harris (1)
Edward Harris (1)
Benjamin Harper (1)
Lewis Hareck (1)
Frank Hanson (1)
Hugh Hamilton (1)
De la Habana (1)
John V. Grivet (1)
Charles V. Gridley (1)
Greenleaf (1)
J. Graff (1)
John Govard (1)
E. Goodwin (1)
Daniel Godfrey (1)
George B. Glidden (1)
P. Giraud (1)
Thomas Gibson (1)
B. F. Gibbs (1)
James S. Geddis (1)
William Gardner (1)
John Gallagher (1)
William Frick (1)
Martin Freeman (1)
John G. Foster (1)
Foretop (1)
Theodore Fletcher (1)
George E. Fleke (1)
Alexander Fivey (1)
Isaac Fisher (1)
Finelli (1)
Michael Fanya (1)
Michael English (1)
Robert Emerson (1)
Robert B. Ely (1)
S. H. Eldridge (1)
William Eldin (1)
George A. Ebbets (1)
N. M. Dyre (1)
M. Dyre (1)
John Dunn (1)
Anthony Dunn (1)
Adam Duncan (1)
R. D. Dumphy (1)
Patrick Duggin (1)
William Doyle (1)
Robert Dougherty (1)
Patrick Dorris (1)
William Doolan (1)
William A. Donaldson (1)
Stephen Dolan (1)
Edward R. Dodge (1)
Nicholas Dillon (1)
John Devereaux (1)
William Densmore (1)
Thomas Dennison (1)
Charles Dennis (1)
E. A. Denicke (1)
Delano (1)
Alexander Degges (1)
Chauncey P. Dean (1)
Charles Deakin (1)
W. H. Davis (1)
Charles Davidson (1)
Ulric Dahlgren (1)
David Curtin (1)
Andrew Crough (1)
Cornelius Cronan (1)
Oliver Crommelia (1)
Thomas Cripps (1)
C. S. Cotton (1)
Corn (1)
Louis Copat (1)
Lewis Copat (1)
C. M. Conrad (1)
Richard Condon (1)
J. H. Comstock (1)
John Collins (1)
Roland M. Clark (1)
Daniel Clark (1)
Christian Christeinick (1)
William H. Childs (1)
James B. Chandler (1)
Joseph Cassier (1)
Michael Cassidy (1)
Douglass R. Cassell (1)
Cassel (1)
Charles L. Carty (1)
Alvin A. Carter (1)
William M. Carr (1)
Francis Campbell (1)
William Caffrey (1)
William Burtis (1)
John M. Burns (1)
John Burns (1)
Francis Burns (1)
Cornelius A. Burns (1)
James Burnes (1)
Richard Burke (1)
George E. Burcham (1)
George E. Burceam (1)
Buehler (1)
John Bryant (1)
H. H. Brownell (1)
William R. Browne (1)
W. R. Browne (1)
William Brown (1)
Robert Brown (1)
James F. Brown (1)
George W. Brown (1)
Francis Brown (1)
Bernard Brown (1)
Charles Brooke (1)
Rufus Brittell (1)
Patrick Brierton (1)
John Brazell (1)
Charles A. Braydon (1)
John Boyle (1)
Joseph Boyd (1)
Emanuel Boyakin (1)
Blowers (1)
Mates Edward Bird (1)
Henry Binney (1)
Bienville (1)
James Bennett (1)
Frank Bennett (1)
John Bengsten (1)
Thomas Bayne (1)
O. A. Batcheller (1)
Edward Baker (1)
G. R. Avery (1)
Thomas Atkinson (1)
James D. Atkinson (1)
Atkin (1)
Richard Ashley (1)
William E. Andrews (1)
Charles Anderson (1)
Ames (1)
John H. Allen (1)
James Alexander (1)
James Agern (1)
William Ager (1)
L. P. Adams (1)
John Quincy Adams (1)
Hyram Adams (1)
John Acker (1)
Andrew Achum (1)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: