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The Southern Marseillaise

A. E. Blackmar, 1861
This was the rallying song of the Confederacy. It was sung throughout the South as early as 1861 while the soldiers were hurried to Virginia.


Sons of the South, awake to glory,
A thousand voices bid you rise,
Your children, wives and grandsires hoary,
Gaze on you now with trusting eyes,
Gaze on you now with trusting eyes;
Your country every strong arm calling,
To meet the hireling Northern band
That comes to desolate the land
Will fire and blood and scenes appalling,
To arms, to arms, ye brave;
Tha avenging sword unsheath!
March on! March on! All hearts resolved on victory or death.
March on! March on! All hearts resolved on victory or death.

Now, now, the dangerous storm is rolling,
Which treacherous brothers madly raise,
The dogs of war let loose, are howling,
And soon our peaceful towns may blaze,
And soon our peaceful towns may blaze.
Shall fiends who basely plot our ruin,
Unchecked, advance with guilty stride
To spread destruction far and wide,
With Southron's blood their hands embruing?
To arms, to arms, ye brave!
Tha avenging sword unsheath!
March on! March on! All hearts resolved on victory or death,
March on! March on! All hearts resolved on victory or death.


Blue coats are over the border

Inscribed to Captain Mitchell.

Air—Blue Bonnets are over the Border.

the old song suggested this; a few lines are borrowed from it.


Kentucky's banner spreads
Its folds above our heads;
We are already famous in story.
Mount and make ready then,
Brave Duke and all his men;
Fight for our homes and Kentucky's old glory.

Chorus—
March! March! Brave Duke and all his men!
Haste, brave boys, now quickly march forward in order!
March! March! ye men of old Kentuck!
The horrid blue coats are over the border.

Morgan's men have great fame,
There is much in a name;
Ours must shine today as it ever has shone!


‘The Southern Marseillaise’

These jolly fellows belong to the Fifth Company of the celebrated Washington Artillery. This was a crack regiment of New Orleans, where the Southern Marseillaise was popular, especially at the opening of the war, when this picture was taken. The young Confederates here are relaxing from discipline over their noonday meal. The frying-pan in the hand of the soldier to the right, also the negligent attitudes, reflect a care-free frame of mind. Their uniforms and accouterments still are spick-span and New. But a few weeks later they distinguished themselves at Shiloh.


As it shines o'er our dead,
Who for freedom have bled:
The foe for their deaths have now got to atone.


The Bonnie blue flag

Harry Macarthy
South Carolina, the first state to secede from the Union, adopted a blue flag bearing a single white star in the center. Almost simultaneously with this change of flag there appeared the spirited song—the Bonnie blue flag.


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