previous next
[110] approach to the Confederate capital was to be attempted from that direction. Already he had proceeded thither with his two divisions which had made the Valley Campaign—his own and Ewell's—when ours, commanded by A. P. Hill, received orders to join them, and all three were thenceforth incorporated in the Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, as long as he commanded it.

we had fought the sharp engagement of Cedar Mountain on the 9th of August, 1862, and checked Pope's advance to the Rapidan. Then, after some days of rest, we again took the initiative and, crossing the little river, went after him. But the General who had heretofore ‘seen only the backs of his enemies’ did not see fit to await our coming, but made so prompt and rapid a retrograde movement that even our expeditious ‘foot cavalry’ could not come up with him before he passed the Rappahannock. It was on this hurried pursuit, passing through Brandy Station, that a figure came riding along the toiling column toward the front. He was in no wise remarkable in appearance, and it was with surprise that the writer heard that he was no other than our commander, General ‘StonewallJackson.

he wore a rather faded gray coat and cap to match—the latter of the ‘cadet’ pattern then in vogue and tilted so far over his eyes that they were not visible, and his mount and General appearance were not distinctive of high rank. In fact, he seemed some courier carrying a message to some General officer on ahead. Despite his West Point training, he was never a showy horseman—in which respect he had a precedent in the great Napoleon. When we took Harper's Ferry, in September of that same year, one of the surrendered garrison remarked, when Jackson was pointed out to him, ‘well, he's not much to look at, but if we'd only had him, we'd never have been in this fix.’

but within the interval we were to see much of him, and our appreciation speedily penetrated below the surface indica-

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
West Point (Virginia, United States) (1)
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (1)
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (1)
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (1)

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide People (automatically extracted)
Sort people alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a person to search for him/her in this document.
Thomas Jonathan Jackson (2)
Stonewall (1)
John Pope (1)
Ambrose Powell Hill (1)
Richard Stoddert Ewell (1)
hide Dates (automatically extracted)
Sort dates alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a date to search for it in this document.
August 9th, 1862 AD (1)
September (1)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: