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[130] forefront, and its gallant Colonel Upton in his report says this was the regiment's first battle. Its loss, as officially reported, was two hundred and twenty-two killed and wounded.

at Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, Franklin with the Federal left broke through Jackson's lines. The Confederates restored their line after heavy losses, and in this counterstroke a North Carolina regiment, fresh from home, drove headlong through the Northern lines and was with difficulty recalled. The apology of one of its privates, when it got back into line, caused a laugh all through the army. ‘if we had a-knowed how to fight like you fellows, we could have done better!’

in the work: Der Burgerkrieg in den Nordamerikanischen Staaten, by Major Scheibert, of the German Engineer Corps, the author says:

after the European cavalry had been discredited in the wars of 1854 and 1859, the American mounted troops brought genuine joy to the heart of every true cavalryman, showing by their service and bravery that a better future might yet be in store for the European cavalry. We could not help sympathizing with the rise of the true spirit of knighthood without fear or blame, and with the many gallant deeds which promised better results.

we could multiply indefinitely these extracts, but space forbids. From the preface to the work of Cecil Battine, captain, Fifteenth, the King's, Hussars, entitled: The crisis of the Confederacy, and History of Gettysburg and the Wilderness, the following is taken:

the History of the American Civil War still remains the most important theme for the student and the statesman because it was waged between adversaries of the highest intelligence and courage, who fought by land and sea over an enormous area with every device within the reach of human ingenuity, and who had to create every organization needed for the purpose after the struggle had begun. The admiration which the valor of the Confederate soldiers fighting against superior numbers and resources excited in Europe; the dazzling genius

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