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[252] which shall be republican [!] and in no wise contravening said oath, such shall be recognized as the true government of the State.

One tenth of the voters can not establish a republican state government, which requires the consent of the people of the state to make its powers just, as has been shown above. Therefore, such a government had not one element of republicanism in it. But what is astonishingly remarkable is the stultification of requiring the one-tenth of the people to ‘reestablish a State gofernment, which shall be republican and in no wise contravening said oath.’ Either he did not know how a republican state government was ‘instituted,’ or, if he knew, then he was a participant in that perversity and wickedness which was above charged to be the characteristic of his war administration.

It will now be shown how he sought ‘to enforce a fiction or establish a fallacy to be as good as truth.’ Of the government thus established by one-tenth of the voters, he says:

Such shall be recognized as the true government of the State, and the State shall receive thereunder the benefits of the constitutional provision which declares that ‘the United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a republican form of government.’

It is proper here to inquire who and what was the tenth to whom this power to rule the state was to be given. It will be seen, by reference to the proclamation, that each voter of the one-tenth, in order to be qualified, is required to take an oath with certain promises in it which are prescribed by an outside or foreign authority. This condition of itself is fatal to a republican state government, that ‘derives its just powers from the consent of the governed.’ Free consent—not cheerful consent, but unconstrained and unconditioned consent—is required that ‘just powers’ may be derived from it. In this instance, the invader prescribes the requisite qualifications of the voter, and makes it a condition that the government established shall ‘in no wise contravene’ certain stipulations expressed in the oath taken to give the qualification. A state government thus formed derives its powers from the consent of the invader, and not ‘from the consent of the governed.’ It has no ‘just powers’ whatever. It is a groundless fabrication. Yet the President of the United States declared, ‘The State shall receive thereunder the benefits of the constitutional provision which declares that “the United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a republican form of government.” ’ Is not this an attempt, while pretending to establish, to destroy true republicanism?

Now, let the reader bear in mind that these remarks relate to Louisiana alone, of which more remains to be told; that there were eleven

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