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[566] chooses the law as a profession, 2; opportunity to enter the Military Academy at West Point, 2; raising funds for West Point, 2, 3; fondness and ability for mathematics, 2, 10; entrance at the Military Academy, 3; a peacemaker between rival sections, 3; life at West Point, 3-15; early friendships, 3, 189; escapes hazing, 3; affection of the eyes, 4; first meeting and subsequent relations with Gen. Scott, 4, 18, 30; use of cards, 5; inattention to study, 5; use of tobacco, 5, 12; high standing in demerits, 5, 13; respect and taste for the study of law, 5, 29; lessons of subordination, 6, 7; a forbidden trip from West Point to New York, 7; views on betting, 8; views on the inspiration of the Scriptures, 8, 9; dismissed from the academy, 9-11; goes to Washington to plead his case, 11; realizes the value of friends, 11; returns to West Point, 12; court-martialed, 12, 241; proficiency in tactics, 13, 14; transferred to Company C, 14; ‘honorable mention,’ 15; pecuniary condition on leaving the academy, 16, 17; graduating leave, 16, 17; first military pay, 17; ruinous affluence, 17; service in the Second Artillery, 17-19; on duty at Fort Moultrie, 17, 18; ascertains the value of a sergeant, 18; adopts a rule with regard to drinking, 19; appointed second lieutenant in First Artillery, 19, 183; on United States mail duty, 21; care of Uncle Sam's money, 21; engaged in an ‘affair of honor,’ 21, 22; proficiency in drawing, 23; military engineering in Florida, 23, 24, 183; ordered to West Point, 24, 25; stricken with fever, 24-26; ‘practises medicine,’ 25; promoted first lieutenant, 25; friendship with A. P. Hill, 25, 26; professional life at West Point, 26-29; formation of studious habits, 27-29; study of physics, 28; literary work, 28; results of Florida fever, 28; study of astronomy, 28, 29; marries Miss Bartlett, 29; children, 29; Secretary of War, 29, 241, 276, 404, 413 et seq., 419-421, 424, 426, 460, 543; abandons hope of promotion, 30; loses taste for the army, 30; early acquaintance with Jefferson Davis, 30; studies the political situation, 30; announces his loyalty and readiness for duty, 30, 32; residences, sojourns, and commands in St. Louis, 30, 50, 51, 53, 64, 84, 110, 424, 425, 427, 428; musters Missouri troops, 32-35; relations with Gen. Harney, 33; reports to Capt. Lyon, 33; defense of the St. Louis arsenal, 34; major, First Missouri Volunteer Infantry, 35; adjutant-general and chief of staff to Gen. Lyon, 35, 37; battle of Wilson's Creek, 35, 39; 40, 42-47, 67, 141, 142, 363, 364; receives the surrender of the Missouri militia, 36, 37; joins Lyon at Boonville, 37; drafts Lyon's letter to Fremont, Aug. 9, 1861, 40, 41; between two fires, 44, 45; commanding First Missouri Volunteer Infantry, 48; ordered east to purchase equipment, 48, 50; ordered to, purchase equipment, 48, 50; ordered to, and subsequently, visits and residences at Washington, 48, 106-110, 255, 345, 346, 379, 395, 413-418, 494; reorganizes his regiment into artillery, 48, 50, 51, difficulties in obtaining guns from Fremont, 50; at Pilot Knob, 51; engagement at Fredericktown, 51-53, 362, 363; appointed brigadier-general of volunteers, 54-56; commanding Missouri militia, 55-60; ordered by Stanton to enforce military confiscation against rebel property in Missouri, 57; limitations of his compliance with order, 57, 58; hostility to, in Missouri, 58-61, 63-65, 90, 91, 93-99, 103, 107-109; anti-Schofield committee from St. Louis to Washington, 58-60, 425; accused of inefficiency and imbecility, 59, 97; commanding the Army of the Frontier, 61; sickness, 61, 62; relinquishes command of the Army of the Frontier, 61; ordered to move north and east, 62, 63; resumes command of the Army of the Frontier, 63-65; organizes Indian regiments, 63; hostility of Lane and Blunt to, 63, 64; opinion of Blunt, 63, 64; his confidence betrayed by Curtis, 63, 65; Herron protests against serving under, 64; opinion of Herron, 64; nominated major-general of volunteers, 64; Senatorial opposition to, 64, 66, 109, 110, 116, 117; reinforces Grant at Vicksburg with men and supplies, 64, 70, 71, 90, 98, 110, 232, 233; at Springfield, 65; hindered from active operations, 65, 66; attitude toward Curtis, 65, 66; temporary humiliation for, 66; relations with Halleck, 66, 68, 111, 360, 361; ordered to Tennessee, 66 (see also Tennessee); reports to Rosecrans at Murfreesboroa, 66; commands division of the Fourteenth Corps at Triune, 16; reappointed major-general by the President, 66; ordered back to Missouri and Kansas, 66; his Irish soldier-servant 6, 66, 67; reduced from major-general to brigadier-general, 67; supersedes Curtis in command of the Department of the Missouri, 68, 69, 96, 97; position on the slavery question, 69, 71, 74-76, 90; military policy, 70; Grant returns troops to, 70, 90; relations with and cordial support froth Pres. Lincoln, 70, 97-99, 101, 102, 108-110; relations with and admiration for Grant, 70, 109-111, 115, 198, 237-240, 252, 293-297, 337, 346, 361, 362, 379-382, 389-391, 412, 414 et seq., 439, 440, 482; relations with Gov. Gamble and the State government of Missouri, 71 et seq., 90; declines to make agreement with Gov. Gamble as to policy, 73, 74; troubles in Kansas, 77 et seq.; Lane's hostility to, 80, 81, 83; interviews with Gov. Carney, 80, 82; in Leavenworth and Kansas City, 80-83; forbids Kansas and Missouri militia crossing the border, 82; interview with Ewing at Kansas City, 82; at Westport, 83; one measure of success, 84; at Independence, 84; modifies Ewing's order, 84; interview with Mayor Anthony, 84; efforts spread disaffection among his troops, 85-87; enforces marital law in Missouri, 85, 92; plot to seize and imprison him, 86; threatens to regulate the press of Missouri, 86, 92; supporters in Missouri, 87, 90, 91; prevents interference with political meetings and orders freedom of voting in Missouri, 88, 100, 101; the Missouri militia placed under his command, 88, 90, 95; charges of misrule against, 89-91; furnishes memorandum to J. S. Rollins, 89, 91; requires the Missouri militia to obey the 102d Article of

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August 9th, 1861 AD (1)
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