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[7] wounded in the brilliant assault on the Garita de Belen, where so much dash was displayed by the American troops.

On the expiration of the Mexican war, when Major Beauregard returned to his home in New Orleans, General Totten, as chief of the Engineer Department, forwarded him the following copy of Gen eral Orders, publishing the brevets he had won on the field of battle:

1. For gallant and meritorious behavior in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mexico, August 20th, 1847, to be Captain by brevet. To date from August 20th, 1847.

2. For gallant and meritorious conduct in the battle of Chapultepec, Mexico, September 13th, 1847, to be Major by brevet. To date from September 13th, 1847.

And General Totten added:

It affords the department high satisfaction to communicate to you the wellearned reward of your efforts on the fields of Mexico.

In order to show the high estimation in which Major Beauregard was held, and the impression his eminent services had produced upon his superior officers and comrades in arms, we here insert the following letters, written with a view to dissuade him from his reported intention of resigning from the service, in the year 1856, during the lull in military affairs which followed the close of the Mexican war:

New York, Dec. 9th, 1856.
Major G. T. Beauregard, U. S. Engineers:
My dear Sir,—I am much concerned to learn that you think of leaving the army, after acquiring, at an early age, so much distinction in it, for science and high gallantry in the field. Your brilliant services in Mexico, nobody who witnessed them can ever forget. They bind the affections of the army to you, and ought, perhaps, to bind you to us. If you go abroad, you give up that connection at some hazard. My best wishes, however, will ever accompany my gallant young friend wherever he may go.


The second letter is from General Persifer F. Smith, under whom Major Beauregard had often served in Mexico. We extract from it the following passage:

I assure you, my dear Beauregard, that I look upon your quitting our service as the greatest calamity that can befall the army and the country. Let me assure you with sincerity, that I know no officer left behind who can replace you if we get into an important war.

Whether it was owing to these remonstrances, or for some other cause, that Major Beauregard altered his determination, we are unable

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