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[501] the south face in place of two 24-pounders, which should be sent to the city for banding and rifling.

The mortars on the gorge should be lowered to the parades, the arches being too weak to withstand the shock of heavy charges; three only should be kept at Sumter, and the others not already disposed of (if any) should be sent to Battery Simkins or Sullivan's Island. The 8-inch columbiad removed from the northeast face he wishes sent to Batteries Bee or Fort Moultrie.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Jno. F. O'Brien, Major, and A. A. G.

Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., August 4th, 1863.
Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, etc., etc.:
General,—The enemy have a picket, it appears, at night in the Marsh Battery Creek, at or near the battery, for the purpose of observing and reporting when our steamers are at Cummings's Point. The Commanding General desires to prevent this if possible, and thinks it may be best done by the navy—to which end he wishes you to see and, if possible, arrange with Captain Tucker for this service.

The mouths of all the creeks debouching in the cove between Morris Island and Shell Point (Battery Simkins) should be watchfully picketed at night, and, if practicable, the enemy's pickets just alluded to should be surprised and captured.

A boat picket thrown out from Legare's Point, in the creek, might also be effective.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff.

Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., August 6th, 1863.
Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, etc., etc.:
General,—After reading your letter of this date, touching the number of troops, etc., on Morris Island, the Commanding General is induced to say that he regards a force of one thousand men as quite sufficient. However, it will be but a proper precaution to be ready to throw there a larger force, in event of danger of assault.

Colonel Keith, in his report, regrets that he was unable to fire at the monitor on the night of the—instant, which had come within some one thousand or twelve hundred yards of Battery Wagner. It is not the wish of the Commanding General that the 10-inch guns in that work should be hastily unmasked, at a range as distant as a thousand yards; it were best to reserve them for use against ironclads which may come as close as was done by the Ironsides recently. Please give the orders to insure rigid adherence to these views of the Commanding General.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff.

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