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[115]

Chapter 4: Bristol County.

The county of Bristol is bounded north by Norfolk County, east by Plymouth, south-east by Buzzard's Bay, and west by the counties of Providence, Bristol, and Newport, Rhode Island. It is divided into nineteen municipalities, of which New Bedford, Fall River, and Taunton are cities. The entire population of the county in 1860 was 93,794, in 1865 it was 89,339; being a decrease in five years of 4,455. The population in 1870 was 102,886, being an increase in five years of 13,191. The total valuation of the county in 1860 was $66,294,526, in 1865 it was $87,428,503; being an increase in five years of $21,133,983.

This county gives rise to several streams, which fall into Massachusetts and Narragansett Bays, the most important of which is ‘Taunton Great River,’ that in times past was famous for its herring fisheries. New Bedford and Dartmouth are well known as being the chief seats of the whale-fishery. Fall River and Taunton are largely engaged in manufactures of various kinds. The aggregate value of articles manufactured in the county in 1865 was $55,038,314. The surface of the county ‘is somewhat broken, but generally level; its soil in many parts is of an inferior quality. It has a maritime coast of considerable extent, indented with numerous headlands, small bays and harbors;’ and its people are extensively engaged in navigation and the fishery, though of late years the attention of its capitalists has been more generally given to manufacturing. The county is also well provided with railroad accommodations.

Bristol County furnished full nine thousand men for the army and navy during the four years of the war. Every city and [116] town filled its quota upon every call for men made by the President; and each one had a surplus at the end of the contest, which, in the aggregate, amounted to fifteen hundred men, of which number eleven hundred and ten belonged to New Bedford. This large surplus, in a good degree, was occasioned by the navy credits, which were allowed by act of Congress passed July 4th, 1864.

The aggregate of war expenses incurred by the cities and towns in the county during the four years of the war, exclusive of State aid, was $904,175.03. The amount of private contributions in aid of recruiting were $50,500.00. The total amount of money raised and expended by the entire county for State aid to the families of volunteers in the army and navy during the four years of the war, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was $553,043.12.


Acushnet

Formerly part of Fairhaven; incorporated Feb. 13, 1860. Population in 1860, 1,387; in 1865, 1,251. Valuation in 1860, $784,837; in 1865, $656,500.

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Cyrus E. Clark, Benjamin Wilson, Benjamin White; in 1864 and 1865, Cyrus E. Clark, Walter Spooner, Pardon Tabor.

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during each year of the war was Jabez Wood.

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year.

1862. At a legal town-meeting, held on the 19th of July, the town voted to pay each person who shall enlist in the military service for three years, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars. George S. Russell, Rodolphus Swift, and James Hammet were chosen a committee to assist the selectmen in recruiting volunteers to fill the contingent of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the bounties. Another meeting was held on the 19th of August, at which it was voted to increase the bounty fifty dollars; and, at an adjourned meeting held on the 28th of November, it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who [117] shall enlist for nine months service, and be credited to the quota of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. Godfrey C. Macomber, Charles G. Davis, Joseph R. Davis, and Adoniram Gilmore were added to the recruiting committee. On the 29th of December the selectmen were authorized to borrow whatever sums of money may be necessary for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers belonging to Acushnet.

1863. No action appears to have been necessary for the town, in its official capacity, to fill its quota and pay bounties and State aid during this year.

1864. A meeting was held on the 4th of April, at which it was voted ‘to raise eight hundred dollars for the payment of bounties, and to reimburse citizens who had advanced money to assist in filling the quotas of the town.’ It was further voted, that the selectmen furnish a statement of the amount of money raised by individuals by voluntary contribution, to encourage volunteers to enlist; and where they have fully obtained the whole amount so paid, they shall hand it over to the assessors, who shall assess the amount upon the property of the town. At a meeting held on the 6th of June, the selectmen were authorized to make a contract with the city authorities of New Bedford, to have a portion of their surplus of volunteers transferred to Acushnet, under the pending call.1 The town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who should enlist prior to March 1, 1865, and be credited to the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. It was also voted ‘that so much as may be necessary to furnish our town's quota under the present call be assessed at the next annual assessment.’

The selectmen in 1866 reported that Acushnet had furnished one hundred and six men for the war, which is probably thirty less than the actual number; as the town furnished its full quota on every call made by the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of twenty over and above all demands. None [118] were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was eleven thousand two hundred and fifty one dollars, and fifty-two cents ($11,251.52).

The whole amount of money raised and expended by the town, during the years of the war, for State aid to the families of volunteers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $21.14; in 1862, $783.35; in 1863, $1,250.09; in 1864, $764.66; in 1865, $600.00. Total amount, $3,419.24.


Attleborough

Incorporated Oct. 19, 1694. Population in 1860, 6,066; in 1865, 6,200. Valuation in 1860, $2,466,316; in 1865, $2,206,660.

The selectmen in 1861 were Handel W. Daggett, A. H. Robinson, Lewis L. Read; in 1862, Handel W. Daggett, A. H. Robinson, Joseph A. Perry; in 1863 and 1864, H. N. Richardson, A. H. Robinson, Joseph A. Perry; in 1865, Willard Blackinton, A. H. Robinson, Joseph A. Perry.

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Shepard W. Carpenter; in 1863 and 1864, H. A. Richardson; in 1865, Willard Blackinton. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was George Price; in 1863 and 1864, George D. Hatch; in 1865, Handel W. Daggett.

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 3d of May; at which it was—

Voted, That the treasurer be authorized to borrow ten thousand dollars, to be used for military purposes as fast as required; that from it those men who enlist in this town and are called into actual service shall be paid a bounty of fifteen dollars a month, in addition to the Government pay; and that each man who is accepted for service shall be paid ten dollars a month while drilling, and shall be furnished such uniform as the military authorities require.

Voted, To present a vote of thanks to the ladies of Attleborough for their kind offer to prepare clothing for those who may leave this town to serve their country, and record in the town-books the following letter received from them:—

‘The ladies of Attleborough wait only an opportunity of testifying [119] their deep interest in the cause of freedom, and their earnest faith that our flag shall be kept unsullied. They rejoice that the present crisis has proved, beyond doubt, that brave, unselfish heroism still exists in our land, roused by no pulse of passion, but beating with the calm, determined will that treachery has roused, and only victory shall appease. Their wishes and sympathies are with our brave troops; and in preparing clothing for those who go from their midst, they offer speedy, cheerful, and zealous hands.’

This communication was signed by Mrs. Cherra M. Blackinton, and thirty-three others of the most respectable and influential ladies of Attleborough. Another town-meeting was held on the 25th of May, at which it was voted that the selectmen have full charge of the expenditure of the military fund appropriated at the last town-meeting. At a meeting held on the 12th of June, it was voted ‘to instruct the selectmen to furnish such additional items of uniform as they may legally do under the appropriation of May 3d for such purposes; also, that they pay to our volunteers for drilling the sum of ten dollars, or such part thereof as corresponds with the vote referred to;’ and authority was given them to draw upon the fund to pay the same. At a meeting held on the 5th of September, the treasurer was authorized to borrow such sums of money as may be required, in anticipation of the same being raised by taxation, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers.

1862. At a special town-meeting held on the 21st of July, the following resolutions were read by Hon. John Daggett, and unanimously adopted:—

Resolved, That we, the inhabitants of Attleborough, fully appreciating the value of the free institutions under which we have so long lived and prospered, and alive to the dangers which threaten their existence and the dismemberment of the Republic, are ever ready to do our part in sustaining those institutions, and transmitting them unimpaired to those who shall come after us.

Resolved, That we deem it our duty to take immediate measures to furnish the quota of volunteers for this town, under the recent call of the President of the United States; therefore—

Resolved, That the selectmen be, and they hereby are, authorized to pay from the treasury of the town a bounty of one hundred dollars to each person who shall enlist in this town as a volunteer, and shall be duly enrolled and accepted. [120]

Resolved, That the treasurer of the town be, and he is hereby, authorized to borrow the sum of six thousand three hundred dollars for this purpose, and give his notes therefor.

Several other votes were passed at this meeting in regard to bounties; and one appointing a committee of nine, ‘three from each part of the town, to aid the selectmen in recruiting.’ The selectmen were also directed ‘to extend aid to the sick soldiers who have been discharged from service,’ and a committee was chosen to have the proceedings of the meeting ‘published in the “Union Gazette and Democrat.” ’ At a meeting held on the 6th of August it was voted to appropriate ‘the sum of two hundred dollars, in addition to the sum appropriated at the last meeting, for the encouragement of enlistments; and to authorize the treasurer to borrow money to carry the same into effect.’ This bounty was to be paid ‘to all volunteers who enlist on or before the 15th of August, and to pay no bounty after that date.’ It was voted, also, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each person who would enlist for nine months service on or before September 1st, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. August 23d, The vote not to pay bounties after the 15th of August was reconsidered; and the selectmen were directed to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to volunteers for nine months service, who would enlist and be credited to the quota of the town before the 1st of September. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money for bounties and recruiting expenses. The following resolutions were read and adopted:—

Resolved, That we, the citizens of Attleborough, in town-meeting assembled, do highly appreciate the military services of the members of Company I, Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers; that we remember with gratitude that they promptly responded to the call of our country when the shrill clarion of war sounded to arms for the purpose of crushing out a wicked rebellion.

Resolved, That we hold in grateful remembrance the sacrifices which they made when they left behind them the loved ones at home, and all the endearing associations that cluster around the domestic altar, and exchanged those comforts and pleasures for the stern duties of the camp and the battle-field; and that we will do what we can, by [121] our influence and means, to encourage their hearts, and awaken in their souls the true fire of patriotism, which they rightfully inherit from a noble ancestry.

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted to the acting Captain of Company I, and published in the ‘Taunton Gazette.’

1863. At a special meeting on the 3d of August, the town voted to pay its proportion of money to the State treasurer, in accordance with section 9 of chapter 116 of the Acts of 1863. Also to pay State aid to the families of drafted men.

1864. On the 29th of March the town voted to refund to citizens the money they had contributed to pay bounties and encourage recruiting to fill the quota of the town on the last call of the President for volunteers. The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. On the 5th of April the bounty to each volunteer who should enlist to the credit of the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars.

Several other meetings were held during the year, to raise money and means to obtain volunteers, pay State aid to soldiers' families, and to reimburse citizens who had advanced money to encourage recruiting.

The selectmen in 1866 reported that the town had furnished five hundred and twenty-four men for the war; but the real number was probably about six hundred and twenty-five, as the town at the end of the war had a surplus of twenty-six, after having filled its quota upon every call made by the President for men. Twenty were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was sixty-five thousand eight hundred and eighty-two dollars and fifty cents ($65,882.50).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $3,876.80; in 1862, $11,092.47; in 1863, $12,853.56; in 1864, $12,050.81; in 1865, $6,500.00. Total amount in four years, $45,873.64.

The ladies of Attleborough, in their labors in behalf of the soldiers during the war, nobly fulfilled the promise made by them at the beginning.


[122]

Berkley

Incorporated April 18, 1735. Population in 1860, 825; in 1865, 888. Valuation in 1860, $317,290; in 1865, $306,002.

The selectmen in 1861 were Walter D. Nichols, John C. Crane, Benjamin Luther; in 1862 and 1863, Simeon Briggs, Walter D. Nichols, William Babbitt; in 1863 and 1865, Walter D. Nichols, William Babbitt, Thomas C. Dean.

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Ephraim French; in 1864 and 1865, Daniel S. Briggs. The town-treasurer during all these years was Abiel B. Crane.

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 30th of April; at which it was decided to sustain at all hazards the institutions of this nation; and, as an evidence of this determination, it was voted to make up the pay of all volunteers in the military service from that town, and to all who might afterwards enlist in the same, to a sum sufficient to make the monthly pay of each twenty-six dollars, to continue to be paid while in the service; also, to pay to each a bounty of fifteen dollars, and to furnish him with a uniform, not to exceed in value ten dollars.

1862. July 21, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars ‘to any person who may enlist within thirty days’ for the term of three years, when mustered into the military service and credited to the quota of the town. The treasurer was authorized to borrow eleven hundred dollars for the payment of the same. The following resolution was unanimously adopted:—

Resolved, That we have confidence in the Government of the United States, and we are of opinion that it should prosecute the war in the most vigorous manner, by making use of all justifiable means which God has placed in its hands to put down this wicked rebellion.

August 13th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars ‘to the next five men who shall enlist and be accepted,’ and a bounty of one hundred dollars ‘to all others who may afterwards enlist to fill the quota of the town.’ The treasurer was directed to borrow thirteen hundred dollars to pay the same. Another meeting was held on the 30th of August, to take [123] means to fill the quota of the town upon the call of the President for three hundred thousand men for nine months service. The treasurer was authorized to borrow eight hundred dollars.

1863. July 27th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow five hundred dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers.

1864. April 2d, Voted, to raise two thousand dollars to refund to citizens money which they had subscribed and paid to aid recruiting and to fill the quotas of the town. The assessors were directed to assess a tax for that purpose. The treasurer was authorized to borrow eight hundred dollars ‘to complete the quota of the town under the last call of the President for more men.’ June 25th, The bounty to each volunteer who should enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town, was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding twenty-five hundred dollars, to pay the same. August 3d, Voted, to borrow an additional sum of twenty-five hundred dollars for the payment of bounties.

1865. At a special meeting held on the 19th of June, the town voted to refund the money which had been contributed by individual citizens to encourage recruiting; and, ‘the war being over,’ voted that the sum be raised by direct taxation.

The selectmen in 1866 reported that Berkley had furnished sixty-eight men for the war; but as the town furnished its quota upon every call of the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of six over and above all demands, the number furnished was probably about eighty-three. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was ten thousand six hundred and seventy-five dollars and fifty-nine cents ($10,675.59).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $287.14; in 1862, $981.50; in 1863, $1,191.43; in 1864, $938.66; in 1865, $434.18. Total amount in four years, $3,832.91. [124]

The ladies of Berkley made generous contributions to the soldiers during the war. The exact amount of these contributions we have not been able to ascertain: we know, however, that they realized upwards of one hundred dollars at one time, by means of a ‘Soldiers' Fair’ held by them.


Dartmouth

Incorporated June 8, 1664. Population in 1860, 3,883; in 1865, 3,434. Valuation in 1860, $2,948,785; in 1865, $2,434,270.

The selectmen in 1861 were Jireh Sherman, Abraham C. White, John W. Baker; in 1862, Jireh Sherman, Calvin K. Turner, 2d, Richard Lapham; in 1863, Jireh Sherman, Richard Lapham, Loring Ashley; in 1864 and 1865, Jireh Sherman, Calvin K. Turner, 2d, Richard Lapham.

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years was William Barker, Jr.

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters relating to the war, was held on the 16th of May; at which the following preamble and resolutions were read, and unanimously adopted:—

Whereas the Government of the United States is now engaged in a struggle for national existence, popular liberty, the perpetuity of the Constitution, and the supremacy of the laws against the myrmidons of slavery, and the enemies of popular liberty, therefore—

Resolved, That as patriots, and friends of the Constitution and the National Government and our righteous institutions, we, the people of Dartmouth, in town-meeting assembled, do recognize to the full extent the perilous position of our once happy, but now belligerent and distracted country, and also the duty which we owe to that Constitution and flag under which we have lived in happiness and prosperity for more than eighty years; and that we proffer unreservedly, and with cheerfulness, our aid and co-operation in defence of our liberties and national flag.

1862. July 21st, A committee appointed for the purpose reported as follows: ‘That the selectmen name a committee of two to serve with themselves as a committee of five, to raise a number of volunteers, not exceeding twenty-seven, without regard to territory or sum of money, and the treasurer be [125] authorized to pay the bills.’ This report was adopted, and remained in force until after the passage of the act in 1864 restricting towns in the payment of bounties; when the town voted that the selectmen should only pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years service, which rule continued until the end of the war.

The selectmen of Dartmouth reported in 1866 that the town had furnished three hundred and fifty-five men for the war, which was very nearly the exact number; but as the town had a surplus of thirty-eight at the end of the war, after having filled its quota upon every call of the President, the number of men furnished must have been at least three hundred and seventy. Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was forty thousand five hundred and seventy-one dollars and twenty-nine cents ($40,571.29).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $103.56; in 1862, $1,758.72; in 1863, $3,398.90; in 1864, $2,385,83; in 1865, $1,700.00. Total amount in five years, $9,347.01.

We have been unable to get a satisfactory statement, one that would do justice to the ladies of Dartmouth for their good works during the war; but we have a general statement, which is highly honorable to them.


Dighton

Incorporated May 30, 1712. Population in 1860, 1,733; in 1865, 1,815. Valuation in 1860, $711,454; in 1865, $776,779.

The selectmen in 1861 were Jeremiah P. Edson, Zebina Wilmarth, Oliver P. Simmons; in 1862, Oliver P. Simmons, George F. Garitt, Nathan Walker; in 1863, George E. Gooding, Weston Earle, Charles H. Gooding; in 1864, Jeremiah P. Edson, Noah Chace, James H. Codding; in 1865, Jeremiah P. Edson, Noah Chace, Allen Talbot.

The town-clerk during all these years was William Wood. [126] The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Noah Chace: in 1865, Oliver P. Simmons.

1861. A day or two after the President issued his first call for troops, in April, 1861, a meeting of the citizens of Dighton was held, and initiatory steps were taken to form a military company; and a petition was signed, requesting the selectmen to call an informal town-meeting, to be followed by a legal meeting, ‘as soon as the proper notice could be given.’ At the informal meeting, ‘patriotic and stirring speeches were made by several of our ministers and a number of citizens; and a committee was chosen to present a series of resolutions at the coming town-meeting. The greatest enthusiasm prevailed throughout the town, and flag-staffs were erected in many quarters.’ At the legal town-meeting held April 29th, the committee presented a preamble and resolutions, which were unanimously adopted. The resolutions were: 1st, ‘We, the citizens of Dighton, do hereby pledge to Liberty and our country our property, our lives, and our sacred honor, and will give our united and hearty support to the Government of the United States, and will hold ourselves in readiness to contribute according to our means, for the defence of our common country, against the dangers now impending over us.’ 2d, That we will encourage enlistments of volunteers; and, whenever they shall be called into service, ‘it is incumbent on us to see that the families dependent on them for support are well provided for.’ 3d, ‘That we will make ample provision for all expenses necessarily incurred in drilling, equipping, and uniforming the volunteers from this town.’ It was also voted to give to each volunteer fifteen dollars a month while in service, a uniform, ‘and a first-rate revolver, if its use will be permitted by the commanding officer;’ also, to give three dollars a week to each person who will drill ‘one hour on three several days of each week for three months.’ The adjoining towns of Somerset and Berkley were invited to join with Dighton in raising a military company. Three thousand dollars were appropriated for war purposes. August 10th, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the act of the Legislature.

1862. July 9th, Voted, to pay each volunteer a bounty of [127] one hundred dollars. August 19th, The bounty was increased to three hundred and twenty-five dollars to three-years volunteers; and on August 28th it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service.

1863. August 29th, Voted, to pay aid to the families of drafted men. September 23d, Voted, to assess a tax to refund to citizens the money they had individually paid for recruiting purposes, and which amounted in the aggregate to sixty-three hundred dollars.

1864. March 28th, Voted, to raise by taxation a sufficient amount of money to repay to citizens money advanced by them for recruiting purposes, ‘not exceeding one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each man enlisted.’ On the 9th of April a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to raise an amount not exceeding one hundred and twenty-five dollars, for bounty to each volunteer who should enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town, under the recent call of the President for more troops.

The selectmen in 1866 reported that the town had furnished one hundred and ninety-four men for the war, which was doubtless the exact number which the town did furnish. It filled its full quota upon every call made by the President for men, and at the end of the war had a surplus of twelve over and above all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thousand four hundred and eleven dollars and fifty-three cents ($31,411.53).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $457.83; in 1862, $1,391.43; in 1863, $1,713.00; in 1864, $1,893.12; in 1865, $1,167.24. Total amount in four years, $6,622.62.


Easton

Incorporated Dec. 21, 1725. Population in 1860, 3,067; in 1865, 3,087. Valuation in 1860, $1,064,221; in 1865, $1,930,900. [128]

The selectmen during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were John Kimball, Horace D. Howard, Joseph Barrows.

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during the same period was John Kimball.

1861. Under the first call of the President for militia for three months service, April 14, 1861, Company B, of the Fourth Regiment Massachusetts Militia, which belonged to Easton, was ordered to join the Regiment; and with it immediately left the State for Fortress Monroe, at which place it arrived on the morning of the 20th of April, being the first loyal regiment which reached Virginia in the war.

The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 29th of April, at which it was voted to pay to each inhabitant (except commissioned officers) of Easton, when called into the military service of the country, fifteen dollars as a gift, ‘and fifteen dollars a month for each month he shall remain in said service.’ A committee was appointed with authority to pay aid to the soldiers' families residing in Easton, ‘at their discretion.’ July 11th, The town voted to raise by taxation three thousand dollars, to defray any expense already incurred, and to fulfil any contract heretofore made with any of its inhabitants, who, as members of the Volunteer Militia, may have been, or may hereafter be, mustered into the service of the United States. Three thousand dollars were also appropriated for the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families, as provided by the law of the Commonwealth.

1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years service, and be credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred dollars, ‘in addition to the pay and bounty of the Government.’ The following resolutions were read at the meeting, and adopted:—

Resolved, That the brilliant successes that have attended our efforts in crushing out this wicked rebellion inspire our hearts with gratitude, and nerve our hands to strike heavier blows for the triumph of Freedom.

Resolved, That we heartily respond to the call of the President for volunteers, believing that an overwhelming force, now put into the [129] field, will make short work with the Rebellion, cover our army with glory, and make our Republic the strongest, as well as the freest, government of the world.

Resolved, That we, the inhabitants of Easton, deeply sensible of the importance of a speedy compliance with the President's late call, although we have already made heavy contributions to the army, yet we will spare no efforts to place our quota promptly in the field.

Resolved, That the preservation of the Union and the Constitution, and the crisis of the hour, call upon us to sacrifice, with a military heart, our lives and our fortunes upon the altar of our country.

August 11th, Voted, to pay to each volunteer for three years service seventy-five dollars, in addition to the one hundred dollars already voted to be paid. August 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months service who enlists and is credited to the quota of the town. December 6th, The bounty was raised to two hundred dollars to each volunteer, to fill the quota of the town, ‘whether he is an inhabitant of the town of Easton or otherwise.’

1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the town, in its corporate capacity, to fill its quota of volunteers during this year.

1864. April 18th, The town voted to refund to the contributors three-fourths of the money paid by them to assist in filling the quotas of the town, of volunteers for military service, under the calls of the President of October, 1863, and February, 1864; also, to raise by taxation ten thousand dollars for recruiting expenses, and the payment of bounties to volunteers to fill the quota of Easton, under the recent calls of the President for more men. July 26th, Voted, to raise money by taxation, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town, under the call of the President dated July 18, 1864.

1835. June 17th, Voted, to refund all money contributed by individuals during 1864, in aid of recruiting men to fill the quota of the town, provided the claim shall be presented in writing to the selectmen before the first day of January next; [130] and persons who have served one year in the military service shall not be taxed to pay any part of said amounts.

The selectmen of Easton reported in 1866 that the town had furnished three hundred and thirty-four men for the war,2 which is more than the number that was required of it. The surplus of men at the end of the war, after the town had filled its quota upon every call made by the President, was thirty-four. Fourteen were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was forty thousand five hundred and three dollars ($40,503.00).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,052.53; in 1862, $5,947.40; in 1863, $4,905.56; in 1864, $4,800.00; in 1865, $2,800.00. Total amount in four years, $20,505.59.

‘The ladies of Easton deserve honorable mention, and great credit, for important and valuable services rendered to their country in the time of its great peril, not merely by their intense patriotism, but by their labors. They organized societies and circles for preparing lint, garments, and many other things necessary for the comfort of the sick and wounded. They were ingenious and indefatigable in their efforts to find ways and means to aid the cause, and mitigate the inevitable evils of war. Their contributions amounted to a very large sum.’


Fairhaven

Incorporated Feb. 22, 1812. Population in 1860, 3,118; in 1865, 2,548. Valuation in 1860, $3,596,609; in 1865, $1,778,217.3

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Rodolphus W. Dexter, Jonathan Cowen, Bartholomew Taber; in 1863, Bartholomew Taber, Jonathan Cowen, George H. Taber; in 1864, Bartholomew [131] Taber, Edwin R. Almy, Ellery T. Taber; in 1865, Bartholomew Taber, Isaiah West, Frederick Taber.

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Tucker Damon, Jr.

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters connected with the war, was held on the 4th of May; at which the selectmen were authorized to raise five thousand dollars to properly equip a guard for the protection of the harbor and coast, and to pay each volunteer who shall enlist from that town into the military service of the United States a sufficient sum to make his pay twenty-five dollars a month, ‘exclusive of rations.’ B. Ewer, Jr., John A. Hawes, and I. F. Ferry were appointed a committee to obtain from the Commonwealth arms and equipments for coast and harbor defence. July 20th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow five thousand dollars to defray any expenses incurred, or which may be incurred, for the organization and maintenance of an armed police to guard against an attack from sea; said police to be discontinued whenever the selectmen of Fairhaven and the mayor and aldermen of New Bedford shall deem it advisable. September 21st, The selectmen were authorized to borrow fifteen hundred dollars for the benefit of a military company to be raised in the town, and to pay each member fifteen dollars when mustered into the service.

1862. April 7th, The selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town; and the selectmen were given full power to act in raising the men. August 23d, The bounty to three-years volunteers was increased fifty dollars, and the bounty to nine-months men was fixed at one hundred dollars. Arthur Cox, William H. Whitfield, George Atwood, Horace Scott, and Isaac Ferry were chosen to aid the selectmen in enlisting men.

1863. April 6th, An appropriation was made for State aid to soldiers' families for the year.

1864. April—, The selectmen were authorized to pay such bounties as they might think proper to volunteers enlisting to [132] fill the quota of the town, provided that not more than one hundred and twenty-five dollars be paid to each person; and to each citizen or resident of the town who enlisted since Oct. 17, 1863, ‘who had received a less sum than others,’ be paid seventy-five dollars. July 30th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow five thousand three hundred and seventy-five dollars to recruit the quota of the town under the recent call of the President for five hundred thousand men.

1865. April 3d, The payment of State aid to the families of volunteers was continued for the year; and the selectmen were directed to continue to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years to the credit of the town, and so continued to the end of the war.

The selectmen reported in 1866 that the town had furnished two hundred and fifty-seven men for the war; but it must have furnished about three hundred, as it filled each of its quotas, and at the end of the war had a surplus of seventeen over and above all demands. Ten were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thousand four hundred and eleven dollars and fifty-three cents ($31,411.53).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $49.56; in 1862, $1,555.75; in 1863, $2,784.39; in 1864, $2,703.27; in 1865, $1,700.00. Total in four years, $8,792.97.

The ladies of Fairhaven held several fairs during the war to raise money for the benefit of the soldiers. Several were also held by the young misses and the children for the same good purpose. The whole amount raised by them was about ten thousand dollars, most of which was expended in the purchase of material for under-clothing and hospital stores, which were forwarded weekly to the Sanitary Commission.

In 1867 the town appropriated seventeen hundred dollars to erect a suitable monument to commemorate the services and [133] sacrifices of the soldiers and sailors of Fairhaven who had died in the service during the war.


Fall River

Incorporated as a town Feb. 26, 1803; as a city, April 12, 1854. Population in 1860, 14,026; in 1865, 17,525. Valuation in 1860, $10,923,746; in 1865, $12,632,419.

The mayor of the city in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, was Edward P. Buffinton. The aldermen were as follows: In 1861, George W. Eddy, Nathaniel B. Borden, Asa Petty, Jr., John Mason, Jr., James Ford, Job B. Ashbury; in 1862, Joseph Borden, Nathaniel B. Borden, Asa Petty, Jr., John Mason, Jr., James Ford, Job B. Ashbury; in 1863, Samuel Hathaway, Joseph Borden, Nathaniel B. Borden, Benjamin Covel, Charles O. Shove, Walter Paine, 3d; in 1864, Weaver Osborn, Joshua Remington, Nathaniel B. Borden, Daniel Stillwell, Walter Paine, 3d, Philip D. Borden; in 1865, James Henry, Joshua Remington, Nathaniel B. Borden, Daniel Stillwell, Walter Paine, 3d, Philip D. Borden.

The city-clerk and city-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Alvan S. Ballard; in 1864 and 1865, George A. Ballard.

1861. A citizens' meeting was held on the 19th of April, Hon. Nathaniel B. Borden chairman; at which it was voted, ‘that the Government of the Union shall be preserved.’ The city government was requested to appropriate ten thousand dollars to provide outfits for volunteers and support for their families; and also to pay each volunteer, or his family, twenty dollars a month, in addition to Government pay. April 24th, The committee of the city council, to whom the above resolutions were referred, reported as follows:—

Whereas, in the Southern section of our country public law is disregarded, the authority of the United States set at defiance, and armed forces have been, and are, organizing, with the avowed purpose of overthrowing the Government as formed by our Revolutionary Fathers, and of establishing a new government, in which freedom of the press, of speech, and of the individual man, shall be more restricted,—in a word, a government for the perpetuation of slavery; and—

Whereas, for the repelling of such forces, the standing army being [134] inadequate, the President of the United States has made requisition on the several States for militia; therefore, to the end that said requisition may be more readily answered,—

Ordered, That to each of our citizens, who may join a militia company of our city, organized according to law, pledged to render military service, whenever and wherever required, whether by authority of the State or the United-States Government, there be paid from the city treasury the sum of fifteen dollars for outfit, when such company shall be mustered into service, and thereafter, for a term not exceeding three months, fifteen dollars a month, the latter to be applied for support of the family or dependants, as the soldier may direct; and if, at the expiration of the service, a balance, or the whole, shall remain unpaid, then payment to be made to the soldier in person [or his legal representatives]; these payments to be in addition to compensation that may be realized from the United-States Government.

These were adopted, and ten thousand dollars were appropriated in accordance therewith. April 29th, The mayor was requested to apply to the State authorities to furnish two hundred muskets for two companies organized in the city. Uniforms for the militia were paid for by the city. Bailey H. Borden sent his check to the mayor for one hundred dollars for the benefit of volunteers. June 5th, Twelve dollars were voted to each volunteer of a new company ‘not wanted at this time.’ September 10th, A bounty of fifteen dollars was authorized to be paid each volunteer ‘who shall join the new company.’

1862. May 28th, ‘Voted, that as a mark of respect to the memory of the first Fall-River soldier who has fallen in the present struggle for the maintenance of our liberties, that we attend the funeral of the late Nathaniel S. Gerry, a private of Company A, Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, in a body.’ June 30th, A similar vote was passed in regard to the death of Lieutenant Jesse D. Bullock, the first Fall-River officer who had fallen in the war.4 The President of the United States having called for three hundred thousand more men, a public meeting was held July 11th; at which it was [135] recommended to pay each volunteer for three years service a bounty of one hundred dollars. The following resolution, among others, was adopted:—

Resolved, That our old men contribute of their substance, and our healthy young men tender their services; remembering that, if in ancient times ‘for a good man some would even dare to die,’ surely for the necessary support of a righteous cause there should be no hesitancy because life would be attended with hazard.

July 12th, The resolutions of the citizens' meeting were adopted by the city government, and the mayor was directed to make arrangements for enlisting men. Another citizens' meeting was held on the 14th of August, at which it was resolved, that the patriotism of Massachusetts will sustain the Government in putting down this Rebellion at any cost of men and money. It was also voted to raise, by subscription, money sufficient to add one hundred dollars to each volunteer's bounty. A resolution was passed to aid the Rev. Elihu Grant to raise a military company for active service. September 1st, The city government voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, when credited to the quota of the city; and forty-five thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same.

The following letter, addressed to the mayor, was read, and a vote of thanks to the writer was passed:—

New Orleans, La., Sept. 21, 1862.
My Dear sir,—I shipped to your address yesterday a small cannon that was captured in this State by a detachment of Company G. Twenty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, from your city, and to whom General Butler gave it as a mark of his appreciation of their conduct; and they now turn it over to the city of Fall River as a trophy from rebeldom. And as the rebel Jackson is now on his way to Bunker Hill, he may possibly come by the Bay-State line. In that event, you will blow him to pieces with it, if he dares to set his foot on Massachusetts soil.

Respectfully yours,

James Brady, Jr., Lt., Co. G, 26th Reg.

1863. March 2d, The mayor was directed to carry into effect the act of the Legislature in relation to the payment of [136] State aid to soldiers' families. November 16th, The free use of the city hall was granted to Mrs. Richard Borden and Mrs. Mary A. Brayton ‘for the purpose of lectures, tableaux, &c., the proceeds to be given to the soldiers.’ December 21st, A lot in Oak-Grove Cemetery, directly in front of the entrance, was set apart as a soldiers' burial-place.5

1864. February 20th. A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Company G, Twenty-sixth Regiment. Two thousand dollars were appropriated ‘to pay expenses attending enlistment services.’ April 4th, The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. June 8th, A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Companies ‘A’ and ‘B’ of the Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers.

1865. May 17th, It was voted as follows:—

Whereas the President of the United States has by proclamation recommended the observance of the first day of June as a day of mourning, in consequence of the death of our late beloved and honored Chief Magistrate, Abraham Lincoln; therefore—

Ordered, That we do take measures for an appropriate observance of the day as recommended by the President, and that a committee be appointed to procure an orator for the occasion, and make necessary arrangements; and the sum of one hundred dollars is hereby appropriated.

Fall River furnished eighteen hundred and forty-five men for the war, which was a surplus of twenty-one over and above all demands. Thirty-seven were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the city on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and seven thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight dollars and three cents ($107,828.03).

The amount of money raised and expended by the city during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $7,262.25: in 1862, $29,771.67; in 1863, $36,476.10; [137] in 1864, $34,000.00; in 1865, $20,000.00. Total amount in four years, $127,510.02.

The ladies of Fall River in April, 1861, formed a ‘Soldiers' Aid Society,’ which held its first meeting for work on the 1st of May. For six weeks they met daily, and worked from morning until evening. After that, they usually met for the same purpose one afternoon in each week. Many other meetings were held for work and consultation: several ladies did their work for the society at their own dwellings. The society retained its organization, and continued its Christian and patriotic labors from April, 1861, to July 28, 1865; during the whole of which time Mrs. Richard Borden was president, ‘whose ceaseless devotion’ to the interests of soldiers merits their warmest acknowledgments, as does also the services of Mrs. Ames, first vice-president, Mrs. William Munday, Mrs. Mary Durfee, Mrs. Arnold, and Miss Caroline Borden, the secretary and treasurer of the society. The society received during the period of its existence $3,347.76 in cash, which was properly expended for materials to be made up for the use of the soldiers. Among the articles furnished were 200 soldiers' uniforms, 231 bed-sacks, 131 bed-quilts, 365 bedcom-forters, 87 blankets, 355 sheets, 262 pillows, 307 pillow-cases, 167 cushions for wounds, 90 dressing-gowns, 380 cotton shirts, 292 flannel do., 284 shirts, 209 drawers, 1,164 pairs woollen socks, 1,365 handkerchiefs, 2,246 towels, 5,589 yards, 323 rolls, 1 box and 4 bundles of bandages, 127 boxes of lint; and a great number and variety of other articles, including pincushions, wines, jellies, pictures, newspapers, books, dried apples, &c. These articles were generally sent to the front through the agents of the Sanitary and Christian Commissions. A large number of valuable donations were sent to Portsmouth Grove Hospital, in Rhode Island, including a Thanksgiving dinner. At the close of the war, in testimony of her valuable services in behalf of the soldiers, Mrs. Richard Borden, the president of the society, was presented with a handsome silver goblet.


Freetown

Incorporated July 21, 1683. Population in [138] 1860, 1,521; in 1865, 1,484. Valuation in 1860, $802,214; in 1865, $706,117.

The selectmen in 1861 were John D. Wilson, James Precket, Paul M. Barnes; in 1862, John D. Wilson, Granville S. Allen, Edmund D. Hathaway; in 1863, John D. Wilson, Edmund D. Hathaway, Elijah D. Chase; in 1864, John D. Wilson, Elijah D. Chase, John W. Peabody; in 1865, John D. Wilson, Ruel Washburn, Philip Evans.

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Silas P. Richmond; in 1863, George W. Hall; in 1864 and 1865, Don. C. H. Hathaway. The town-treasurer in 1861 was John D. Wilson; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, James Burr; in 1865, Guilford Hathaway.

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters connected with the war, was held on the 9th of May, at which one thousand dollars were appropriated to assist the families of volunteers living in the town; and John H. Macomber, Thomas Leeburn, and James W. Hathaway were appointed to disburse the same in an equitable and proper manner.

1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years military service, and be mustered in to fill the quota of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow the money to pay the same; and Marcus M. Rounsville and David B. Hill were chosen ‘to attend to the business of recruiting.’ August 7th, The bounty was increased to two hundred dollars, provided the quota of the town is filled by the 15th of the month. F. A. Cleveland, Granville S. Allen, Bradford W. Clark, and James H. Hathaway were added to the recruiting committee. August 22d, The town voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist in the military service for nine months, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, said bounty to be paid only to those who are inhabitants of Freetown. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same.

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity in relation to the war, although recruiting and the payment of State aid to soldiers' families were continued as before. [139]

1864. On the 26th of March the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who should enlist to fill the quota of the town, under the call of the President, issued Oct. 17, 1863, ‘excepting those who have already received a gratuity from individuals.’ The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay bounties.

Freetown, according to the return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished one hundred and eighteen men for the war; but the real number was about one hundred and fifty, as it had a surplus of four at the end of the war, after having filled its quota upon every call made by the President for men. Eleven were commissioned officers, one of whom was Ebenezer W. Pierce, Esq., who lost an arm in 1862 before Richmond, and was made a brigadier-general of volunteers by President Lincoln. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was sixteen thousand and sixty-one dollars ($16,061.00).

The whole amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $449.45; in 1862, $2,978.62; in 1863, $3,524.34; in 1864, $3,167.48; in 1865, $2,200.00. Total amount in four years, $12,319.89.


Mansfield

Incorporated April 26, 1776. Population in 1860, 2,114; in 1865, 2,131. Valuation in 1860, $711,080; in 1865, $750,442.

The selectmen in 1861 were William B. Bates, Elbridge Sweet, Hiram H. White; in 1862 and 1863, William B. Bates, Elbridge Sweet, James W. White; in 1864, William B. Bates, Elbridge Sweet, William Robinson; in 1865, Elbridge Sweet, William Robinson, E. Copeland.

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years was E. M. Reed.

1861. April 29th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated to pay each inhabitant of the town, ‘when called into service,’ fifteen dollars, and fifteen dollars a month while in the service; [140] also, to furnish one outfit for each man. James W. White, William Robinson, William C. Bessom, Daniel W. Dean, and Nathaniel Whitmore were appointed to have charge of the appropriation, and to carry out the votes of the town. July 29th, What remained of the five thousand dollars was appropriated to pay State aid to the families of soldiers.

1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers during the year. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and seventy-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. Hon. John Rogers offered to give each man twenty-five dollars in addition. August 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. Committees were chosen to enlist the men.

1863. March 2d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. July 23d, ‘Voted, that the treasurer borrow such sums of money as will be sufficient to procure thirty men as substitutes for those men who have been drafted from this town; such sums not to exceed, in the aggregate, ten thousand dollars.’

1864. February 13th, The selectmen were directed to make an equitable apportionment among the citizens of the town upon the property and polls, for the sum of two thousand dollars to be expended in procuring volunteers. March 29th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow $5,125, to pay the expense of filling the quota of the town under the pending call of the President for five hundred thousand men. June 17th, The selectmen were directed to borrow, not exceeding ten thousand dollars, ‘for procuring volunteers from time to time, as they may be called for.’ December 12th, Voted, to assess a tax upon the property and polls of the town ‘sufficient to pay for the town's quota, under the next call of the President.’

1865. October 16th, A sum not to exceed five thousand dollars was appropriated to reimburse citizens for money expended by them in procuring volunteers in the year 1864.

Mansfield, according to the return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished two hundred and forty men for the war; which [141] was the true number, and was a surplus of seventeen over and above all demands. Thirteen were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-five thousand two hundred and forty-two dollars and twenty-one cents ($35,242.21).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $1,101.33; in 1862, $2,980.89; in 1863, $3,046.36; in 1864, $4,060.06; in 1865, $2,900.00. Total amount in four years, $14,098.64.


New Bedford

Incorporated as a town Feb. 23, 1787; as a city, March 9, 1847. Population in 1860, 22,300; in 1865, 20,863. Valuation in 1860, $24,196,138; in 1865, $20,525,790.6

In 1861, Isaac C. Taber, mayor; Warren Ladd, James L. Humphrey, Nathan Lewis, John P. Barker, Matthew Howland, William H. Reymond, aldermen. In 1862, Isaac C. Taber, mayor; Warren Ladd, B. Penniman, Jr., Nathan Lewis, John P. Barker, Matthew Howland, William H. Reymond, aldermen. In 1863, George Howland, Jr., mayor; Warren Ladd, George G. Gifford, Ambrose Vincent, John P. Barker, Matthew Howland, John H. Perry, aldermen. In 1864, George Howland, Jr., mayor; Warren Ladd, George G. Gifford, Ambrose Vincent, John P. Barker, Matthew Howland, John H. Perry, aldermen. In 1865, George Howland, Jr., mayor; Warren Ladd, George G. Gifford, Joseph Knowles, George F. Kingman, Matthew Howland, John H. Perry, aldermen.

The city-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Sanford S. Horton; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Henry T. Leonard. The city-treasurer during all the years of the war was James B. Congdon.

1861. April 19th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for the benefit of the ‘City Guards,’ to be expended under the direction of the mayor and a committee of the city council. [142] Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for the formation of a Home and Coast Guard. The American flag was ordered to be displayed from the City Hall until otherwise ordered. July 15th, A report was received, showing that Fort Phenix in Fairhaven, and Fort Taber in New Bedford, mounting eleven guns, had been manned by the Home Guard, and recommending an additional appropriation to maintain the same; and on the 29th of July five thousand dollars were appropriated. September 5th, The mayor was authorized to organize one or more companies ‘for the national army,’ the bounty to each member not to exceed fifteen dollars. November 20th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. December 15th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of soldiers' bounties.

1862. January 3d, A report was made that three companies of volunteers for three years military service had been organized. January 4th, This being the close of the municipal year, a report and resolution complimentary of the outgoing mayor, Hon. Isaac C. Taber, were unanimously adopted. July 10th, Seven thousand five hundred dollars were appropriated to establish a General Hospital for sick and wounded soldiers, provided the General Government should ‘decide to locate one in this city.’ Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years military service, to the credit of the city. Twenty-six thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. The use of the spacious City Alms House, capable of accommodating three hundred sick and wounded soldiers, was offered to the General Government, which offer was respectfully declined. August 18th, The bounty to volunteers was increased to two hundred and fifty dollars; and twenty thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. Twenty-five thousand dollars were appropriated to pay said bounties. October 21st, A further appropriation of five thousand dollars was made for the Home and Coast Guard, and twenty thousand for military bounties, which on the 13th of December was increased by a loan of twenty-six thousand dollars. [143]

1863. February 26th, The city council adjourned ‘for the purpose of paying their respects to Governor Andrew and General Wool at the city hall.’ March 4th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families ‘of colored citizens who shall be mustered into the service of the United States.’ April 9th, Five hundred dollars were authorized to be expended on the enlistment of a company of heavy artillery, which on the 21st of May was increased to one thousand dollars. July 15th, ‘A watchman was discharged for using seditious language.’ July 30th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of drafted men. ‘Ordered, that the bells be rung and a salute fired on the day of the Public Thanksgiving on the 6th of August.’ September 24th, The treasurer was directed to pay the Treasurer of the Commonwealth $15,450.68, ‘under the laws in relation to the reimbursement of bounties.’

1864. November 17th, Voted, that the poll-taxes of the returned soldiers belonging to New Bedford be remitted.

1865. January 7th, Appropriate resolutions were passed in regard to the death of Hon. Edward Everett, and Ex-Governor John H. Clifford was invited to deliver a eulogy on the life and character of the deceased. February 7th, The mayor recommended the ringing of the bells and the firing of one hundred guns in honor of President Lincoln signing the emancipation proclamation. April 10th, A committee was appointed to make arrangements to celebrate the fall of Richmond and the surrender of General Lee. April 15th, A message was received from the mayor making an official announcement of the death of President Lincoln, and a committee was appointed to consider and report upon the proper measures to be taken in regard to it. The committee reported a series of appropriate resolutions, which were adopted.7 June 22d, Alderman Gifford presented to the council a rebel flag captured at Charleston, S. C., Feb. 18, 1865, and sent to him by Captain James W. Grace, of Company C, Fifty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (colored). [144]

New Bedford furnished about thirty-two hundred men for the war, which was a surplus of eleven hundred and ten men over and above all demands.8 One hundred and twenty were officers in the military service. We do not know the number who served in the navy. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and seventy-seven thousand dollars ($177,000.00).

The amount of money appropriated and expended by the city during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of volunteers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $5,091.52; in 1862, $25,257.29; in 1863, $40,146.04; in 1864, $36,500.00; in 1865, $18,500.00. Total amount in four years, $125,495.85.

The Ladies' Soldiers' Relief Society donated for the relief of the soldiers upwards of twenty thousand dollars in money; in cotton cloth and flannel, four thousand dollars; and in hospital stores to the value of six thousand dollars. The following are some of the articles contributed: Condensed milk, preserved fruits, jellies and pickles, farina, maizena, tamarinds, lemons, dried apples, tea, coffee, cocoa; 1,116 bottles of wine, consisting of sherry, currant, blackberry, and native wines; 423 bottles of brandy; 1,130 bottles of blackberry brandy and syrups; 345 bottles of port wine; large contributions for the Thanksgiving dinner and Christmas trees at Portsmouth Grove Hospital, besides bushels of lint and bandages. ‘The Society for the Comfort and Relief of our Soldiers in Hospitals’ furnished, among other things, 5,904 flannel and cotton shirts, 3,887 pairs of drawers, 4,573 woollen socks, 1,790 towels, 94 coats, 76 vests, 120 collars, 1,000 handkerchiefs, 368 cravats, 314 dressinggowns, 1,836 pocket-handkerchiefs, 300 pants, 148 napkins, 678 pairs slippers, 265 woollen mittens, 542 blankets, 515 sheets, 673 pillows, 750 quilts, 988 canes, 1,280 woollen under-shirts, &c.

The contributions named above are certainly remarkable, but [145] we have to add that the ladies of New Bedford began early in the war. They held a meeting on the 18th of April, 1861, and organized for the work. Mrs. Joseph C. Delano was chosen president, Mrs. Lawrence Grinnel vice-presidentEddy, and Mrs. William Eddy secretary and treasurer. In addition to the above contributions, five hundred dollars were given by a lady to pay soldiers' wives for sewing. They also sent contributions to the St. Louis and Baltimore Soldiers' Fairs, and furnished tables at the New York and Boston Fairs.


Norton

Incorporated June 12, 1777. Population in 1860, 1,848; in 1865, 1,709. Valuation in 1860, $818,451; in 1865, $842,527.

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Augustus Lane, William D. Wetherill, Horatio Bates; in 1863, William D. Wetherill, Horatio Bates, Benjamin E. Sweet; in 1864 and 1865, William D. Wetherill, Horatio Bates, Charles Sprague, Jr.

The town-clerk and the town-treasurer during all of these years was Austin Messenger.

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 4th of May, at which it was voted ‘that the town furnish each soldier who may enter the service of the country from Norton with a uniform, not to exceed ten dollars in cost; and that each soldier who has entered the service of the country, and who shall hereafter enter it from the town of Norton, shall receive fifteen dollars as a bounty; and a sum per month, in addition to what he may receive from the General Government or from the State, sufficient to make his pay twenty-six dollars per month, to be paid monthly.’

1862. At a regular meeting held on the 7th of April, the town voted to appropriate whatever money was necessary for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers residing in Norton, said payments to be made by the selectmen, ‘and in accordance with a law of the Commonwealth.’ Another town-meeting was held on the 29th of July, at which it was voted ‘to pay two hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist [146] into the service of the country in this town within ten days, to be paid when properly mustered in and credited, the number not to exceed twenty-two.’ On the 23d of August the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, who is credited to the quota of the town.

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year, although recruiting went on, and the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families continued as before.

1864. At the regular yearly meeting held April 4th, the town voted ‘to raise twenty-six hundred and twenty-five dollars by taxation, for the purpose of procuring the quota of volunteers called for from the town of Norton by the President Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864, and for paying and refunding money which has already been paid and contributed in aid of and for the above purpose.’ Another meeting was held on the 11th of June, when it was voted “to raise fifteen hundred dollars for the purpose of paying for the town's quota called for by the President March 4, 1864.”

1865. The war being over, a special town-meeting was held June 24th, at which it was voted ‘to raise by taxation four thousand dollars for paying and refunding money contributed by individuals in aid of and for the purpose of filling the quota of the town of Norton under any requisition, order, or call of the President or War Department of the United States during the year 1864.’

Norton furnished, according to the return made by the selectmen in 1866, one hundred and eighty-one men for the war, which we believe to have been the exact number, as at the end of the contest Norton had a surplus of twenty-five over and above all demands. Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-three thousand one hundred and eleven dollars and thirteen cents ($33,111.13).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, [147] and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $69.84; in 1862, $820.67; in 1863, $1,971.13; in 1864, $1,351.29; in 1865, $1,056.52. Total in four years, $5,269.45.

‘The ladies of Norton held several fairs to raise money for the benefit of the soldiers, and during the whole of the war were at work making garments and other comfortable things for them, which were forwarded at different times.’


Raynham

Incorporated April 2, 1731. Population in 1860, 1,746; in 1865, 1,868. Valuation in 1860, $1,030,743; in 1865, $1,115,026.

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, were Henry H. Crane, Enoch Robinson, John D. G. Williams; in 1865, Henry H. Crane, Enoch Robinson, Thomas B. Johnson.

The town clerk and treasurer during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Samuel Jones; in 1865, Dennis Rockwell.

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters relating to the war, was held on the 30th of April, at which it voted ‘that each soldier of the Bristol County Brigade, who resides in Raynham, be paid the sum of three dollars a week from the time of the medical examination to the time when mustered into the service; after that, to their families, or to themselves, if they have none.’ Also, fifteen dollars a month to each soldier ‘until some uniform law is adopted regulating their pay;’ also, a bonus of fifteen dollars when mustered into the military service. Five thousand dollars were appropriated to carry into effect the foregoing votes, the distribution and expenditure of which were given to the selectmen. July 20th, Eight hundred dollars were apppropriated for State aid to the families of the soldiers, and on the 4th of November five hundred dollars more were voted for the same purpose.

1862. March 3d, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. July 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who has enlisted, or who may enlist, within thirty days for three years, and be mustered in to the credit of the town. [148] August 16th, An additional sum of seventy-five dollars was voted to be paid to each volunteer who enlisted to fill the first quota of the town. September 1st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in the military service for nine months, and be credited to the quota of the town. At a meeting held on the 25th of September, the bounty was increased to one hundred and fifty dollars.

1863. At a meeting held on the 2d of March, five thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families; and on the 17th of October Rev. Enoch Sanford, Cassander Gilmore, Charles T. Robinson, Sylvanus Makepeace, Enoch King, Ober S. Wilber, John Hanscom, and Theodore Dean were chosen to assist the selectmen in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota of the town.

1864. At the annual town-meeting held March 7th, an appropriation was made for the payment of State aid; and on the 4th of April the town voted ‘to continue recruiting, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town;’ this to continue until March, 1865. Another town-meeting was held on the 30th of July, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay the same bounty to men who enlist in the navy. This was continued until the end of the war.

Raynham, according to the return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished two hundred and nine men for the war, which we regard as about fifteen more than was actually credited, as at the end of the war the town had, after filling its quota upon every call made, a surplus of eighteen men. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-two thousand four hundred and forty-nine dollars and fifty-three cents ($22,449.53).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of enlisted men, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $1,120.74; in 1862, [149] $3,226.31; in 1863, $3,944.54; in 1864, $4,712.07; in 1865, $3,139.83. Total amount in four years, $16,243.49.

Tile ladies of Raynham sent to the various hospitals, during the war, thirteen boxes of clothing, bedding, lint, dried fruits, and other articles, and did a great deal of useful work.


Rehoboth

Incorporated June 4, 1645. Population in 1860, 1,932; in 1865, 1,843. Valuation in 1860, $884,436; in 1865, $764,906.

The selectmen in 1861 were George B. Bliss, Nathaniel B. Horton, George W. Bliss; in 1862, George B. Bliss, Nathaniel B. Horton, Ira Perry; in 1863 and 1864, George B. Bliss, Nathaniel B. Horton, Remember Smith; in 1865, Bradford B. Horton, Nathaniel B. Horton, Remember Smith.

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Cyrus M. Wheaton. The town-treasurer during the same period was George H. Carpenter.

1861. A special town-meeting was held on the 6th of May, at which it was voted ‘to raise a volunteer company to be in readiness for service when called upon by the Governor; and that fifteen dollars bounty be paid to each person, a citizen of this town, who shall enlist, and when called into actual service to be paid fifteen dollars a month in addition to what he received from the Government during his actual term of service; and to be paid ten dollars for a uniform, and one dollar a day for drill service two days in each week, to drill three hours each day, not to exceed three months when organized.’ The treasurer was authorized to borrow five thousand dollars to carry the above vote into effect, and John C. Marvel and Cyrus M. Wheaton were associated with the selectmen ‘to draw such sums of money from the treasury as may be needed to pay the above expenses.’ John C. Marvel, N. B. Horton, and M. R. Randall were chosen ‘to enlist volunteers.’ At a meeting held on the 12th of August, five hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid, ‘in accordance with an act of the Legislature.’

1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 28th of July, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred [150] and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the town; and, ‘if said quota is filled by September 1st, an additional twenty-five dollars.’ The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-two hundred dollars. A large committee was chosen to recruit men. At a meeting held on the 14th of August, the bounty was increased to three hundred dollars; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow sixty-six hundred dollars to meet the expense. On the 22d of August the town voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, when credited to the quota of the town. The treasurer was directed to borrow the money to pay the same. September 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families. At a special meeting held on the 6th of October, it was voted ‘that the enlisting committee be authorized to procure soldiers from other towns which have exceeded their quotas, and pay them such bounties as they may agree upon, to fill the quota of this town.’

1863. At a special meeting held December 7th, N. B. Horton, Nelson Goff, and M. R. Randall were chosen ‘to furnish the town's quota under a call of the President dated Oct. 17, 1863,’ and said committee ‘was authorized to borrow a sufficient sum of money for that purpose.’

1864. At a special meeting held on the 16th of April, the following votes were passed: First, To raise twenty-five hundred dollars by taxation to reimburse individuals who have advanced money to assist recruiting. Second, To raise thirteen hundred and twenty-five dollars, to complete the quota of the town on the last call of the President. Third, to authorize the treasurer ‘to hire money, if necessary, to fill any future call of the President for men, up to March 1st, 1865.’ At a meeting held on the 30th of July, the bounty to volunteers for three years was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars.

1865. A special meeting was held on the 21st of October, at which it was voted ‘to refund all moneys which have been contributed by individuals for filling the quota of men for the present war, and that the treasurer be authorized to hire a sufficient sum of money to pay the same.’ [151]

Rehoboth was reported by the selectmen in 1866 to have furnished one hundred and sixty men for the war, which was probably twenty-five less than the actual number furnished, as at the end of the war the town had a surplus of eighteen over and above all demands made upon it. Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thousand and thirty-two dollars and ninety-six cents ($31,032.96).

The amount raised and expended by the town during the four years of war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $54.10; in 1862, $916.86; in 1863, $2,062.56; in 1864, $1,688.10; in 1865, $1,550.00. Total amount in four years, $6,271.62.

The ladies of Rehoboth contributed liberally to the wants of the soldiers. Several barrels containing clothing and other useful articles were sent to Lieutenant Cyrus W. Wheaton, Jr., Company B, Eighteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, while at the front, and to the Sanitary Commission. There were two organizations in the town: one was called ‘The Home Circle,’ and the other ‘The Congregational Church Home Circle.’


Seekonk

Incorporated Feb. 26, 1812. Population in 1860, 2,662; in 1865, 929.9 Valuation in 1860, $1,365,550; in 1865, $498,844.

The selectmen in 1861 were Francis Armington, Samuel Chaffee, Allen J. Brown; in 1862, Viall Medbury, Jonathan Chaffee, George H. Carpenter; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Zebinia W. Brown, Samuel Chaffee, Willard C. Ormsbee.

The town-clerk in 1861 was Henry H. Ide; in 1862, Jonathan Chaffee; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, W. C. Ormsbee. [152] The town-treasurer in 1861 was Thomas W. Aspinwall; in 1862, John Hunt; in 1863, Ezekiel C. Cushing; in 1864 and 1865, Ira Chaffee.

1861. A general town-meeting was held on the 1st of May, to ‘know what action should be taken in the present crisis in regard to organizing a militia company in Seekonk.’ After discussion it was voted to raise one. Tristram Burgess, Esq., gave his check for one hundred dollars in aid of the enterprise; and, on motion of Mr. Burgess, it was voted that, as part of the town may soon be set off to Rhode Island, a committee be appointed to raise money by subscription to arm and support the company, and that a roll be immediately opened for volunteers to sign. The meeting then adjourned until May 11th (in the mean time the company had been raised). It was voted ‘that the company raised have the use of the town hall for drilling, but not to be used on Sunday evenings.’ On the 22d of May another adjourned meeting was held, but nothing of especial interest or importance was done. On the 5th of November a meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of volunteers ‘in such sums as will be refunded by the State.’

1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 22d of July, which voted ‘to raise by taxation one hundred and twenty-five dollars bounty to each volunteer, when sworn in and accepted.’ Another meeting was held August 14th (when the separation had taken place), at which the town voted to pay a bounty of four hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist for three years, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; also, a gratuity of three hundred dollars to each man who may be drafted, accepted, and credited to the quota of the town, the money for the payment of which ‘to be taken from the school-fund.’ At a meeting held on the 28th of August, the town voted to give a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, ‘and to borrow the money to pay the same from the school-fund.’ The selectmen were requested ‘to resign the office of recruiting;’ and John A. Hammond was appointed recruiting agent, ‘with reasonable pay.’ Another town-meeting was held on the 24th of September, [153] when the recruiting officer was directed to enlist eighteen volunteers for nine months service, and to pay the expenses of recruits ‘from home to camp and back, who may be rejected.’ On the 14th of October the town voted to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, and twelve hundred dollars to pay bounties to recruits to fill the quota of the town.

1863. A special meeting was held on the 1st of August, at which the selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men; and on the 10th of December the town voted to pay a bounty of three hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, ‘provided the State will refund the same;’10 and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money.

1864. A town-meeting was held on the 4th of April, at which eleven hundred and twenty-five dollars were appropriated ‘to reimburse citizens who had voluntarily contributed money to fill the quotas of the town.’ It was also to pay henceforth a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each person who should volunteer for three years service, and be credited to the quota of Seekonk. On the 3d of September it was voted to raise seventeen hundred and fifteen dollars ‘to pay recruiting bills;’ and that every person liable to draft should pay five dollars; those not liable, two dollars; and the remainder, if any, ‘to be assessed upon estates.’ At a meeting held on the 17th of September, ‘the tax-collector was instructed to collect to deficiency on the polls of those liable to draft.’ Other meetings were held during the year, but nothing of special interest was transacted.

1865. On the 30th of June a town-meeting was held, the war being over, at which it was voted ‘to raise money by taxation sufficient to reimburse to citizens the amounts they had advanced to encourage recruiting and fill the quotas of the town.’

The selectmen of Seekonk reported in 1866 that the town had furnished seventy men for the war, which must have been of necessity only guess-work. The facts show that Seekonk furnished its full quota upon every call made by the President, [154] and at the end of the war had a surplus of three over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fourteen thousand nine hundred and forty-three dollars and fifty cents ($14,943.50).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $65.50; in 1862, $394.41; in 1863, $613.55; in 1864, $892.65; in 1866, $586.30. Total amount in four years, $2,552.31.


Somerset

Incorporated Feb. 20, 1790. Population in 1860, 1,793; in 1865, 1,791. Valuation in 1860, $914,070; in 1865, $865,618.

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Henry E. Marble, Alfred Pratt, Nathan A. Chase; in 1864, William P. Hood, William F. Hathaway, Marcus A. Brown; in 1865, William P. Hood, William F. Hathaway, William H. Pierce.

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Leonard C. Pierce; in 1865, Elbridge G. Paul.

1861. The first legal meeting, to consider matters relating to the war, was held May 1st, at which it was voted to appropriate five hundred dollars ‘to furnish uniforms for a military company;’ also, to pay each volunteer a bounty of twenty-five dollars, and to pay him twenty-six dollars a month, ‘including his Government pay,’ while in active service. The treasurer was authorized to borrow three thousand dollars ‘to meet these expenditures.’ A committee of seven was chosen, in whose charge the expenditure of the money was placed. November 5th, Four hundred dollars were appropriated to pay aid to the families of volunteers living in the town.

1862. July 21st, Voted, to pay to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, to fill the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars, when mustered into service. The treasurer was authorized to borrow thirty-five hundred dollars to pay the same. August 9th, The bounty was increased to [155] three hundred dollars, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-seven hundred dollars to pay it. A committee of seven was appointed to aid the selectmen in recruiting. August 14th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town for nine months service. The selectmen and treasurer were authorized to borrow from time to time the amount of money that may be required to pay bounties, not to exceed in the aggregate six thousand dollars. Four more persons were added to the recruiting committee. August 30th, The vote limiting the amount to be borrowed to six thousand dollars was reconsidered, and the selectmen and treasurer were allowed to borrow whatever sums might be necessary to pay bounties and prevent a draft. Meetings were held nearly every week during the summer and autumn to encourage recruiting.

1863. March 2d, Voted, to raise six hundred dollars to pay aid to the families of volunteers. This sum was increased in April and June fourteen hundred dollars, and on the 24th of October it was still further increased six hundred dollars. November 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow ten thousand dollars for recruiting purposes.

1864. April 14th, Voted, to appropriate seventeen hundred and fifty dollars to pay bounties to fourteen men. April 12th, Voted, to borrow fifteen hundred dollars to pay bounties to twelve men; voted, to assess the sum of two thousand nine hundred and fifty dollars ‘to refund the voluntary tax, and for recruiting purposes.’ Several other meetings were held during the year, at which money was appropriated, and means taken to obtain volunteers to fill the quota of the town.

1865. January 9th, Voted, to raise fifteen hundred dollars to pay bounties to twelve volunteers.

Somerset was reported by the selectmen in 1866 as having furnished one hundred and ninety-seven men for the war, which may have been a little in excess of the credits which the town received; but Somerset filled its quota upon every call of the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of fourteen over and above all demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty [156] thousand four hundred and eight dollars and fifty-five cents ($30,408.55). A considerable amount was raised by private subscription which is not included in this amount.

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $213.00; in 1862, $1,301.60; in 1863, $2,264.04; in 1864, $2,093.75; in 1865, $1,900.00. Total amount in four years, $7,772.39.

We only know in general terms that the ladies of Somerset ‘did a great deal of work for the soldiers during the war.’


Swanzey

Incorporated Oct. 30, 1667. Population in 1860, 1,430; in 1865, 1,335. Valuation in 1860, $743,335; in 1865, $755,680.

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John Earle, Allen Mason, Seth Brown; in 1863, Allen Mason, Seth Brown, Phillip Buffinton; in 1864, Allen Mason, Seth Brown, Samuel Boyd; in 1865, Allen Mason, Seth Brown, Elijah P. Chace.

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was James Mason. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Joseph F. Chace; in 1864, John A. Wood; in 1865, Joseph G. Luther.

1861. A citizens' meeting was held on the 4th of May, the day on which information was received that the President had made a call for seventy-five thousand troops for three years service. After discussion, the meeting voted to pay to each inhabitant of the town who would enlist under the call a gratuity of fifteen dollars, and to allow his wife one dollar, and each of his children under fourteen years of age fifty cents, a week, for three years, unless the soldier was sooner discharged; and the treasurer was to borrow the money to meet the expenditure. A legal town-meeting was held on the 5th of November, at which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the act in relation to that subject, passed at the extra session of the Legislature.

1862. A town-meeting was held on the 21st of July, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one [157] hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for three years in the military service, and be credited to the quota of the town; and the treasurer was directed to borrow money to pay the same. Another meeting was held on the 9th of August, at which Allen Mason, Seth Brown, Nathan M. Wood, and Parker H. Weaver were appointed a recruiting committee. On the 13th of August this committee reported that the quota of the town had been filled. Another meeting was held on the 16th, at which it was voted to recruit two more men; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow five thousand dollars for recruiting and bounty purposes. The selectmen were also directed to confer with the town authorities of the adjoining towns of Rehoboth, Somerset, Dighton, and Seekonk, in regard to raising a military company for nine months service, of which number the town of Swanzey was to furnish seventeen men. An adjourned meeting was held on the 22d of August, when a report was made by the selectmen, that they had conferred with the selectmen of the other towns, and they were unanimous in favor of the project. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money ‘sufficient to pay State aid to the families of soldiers living in Swanzey.’ Another meeting was held on the 30th of August, when a report was made by the recruiting committee concerning enlistments, which was regarded as satisfactory. The town voted to direct the treasurer to borrow, not exceeding four thousand dollars, ‘to pay the nine-months volunteers.’ On the 27th of September still another meeting was held, at which the treasurer was authorized to borrow more money for the payment of bounties to volunteers, and State aid to their families.

1863. A legal town-meeting was held on the 14th of December, at which the town appointed Allen Mason and Mason Brown agents to recruit seventeen men to fill the quota of the town under ‘the new call of the President;’ and that they be allowed and paid two dollars and fifty cents a day while engaged in the work, ‘and reasonable travelling expenses.’

1864. Several meetings were held during this year to devise ways and means to encourage recruiting and to provide State aid for the soldiers' families, the last of which was on the 14th [158] of June, when the recruiting agents were directed to recruit men to fill the quota of the town, under a call which it was expected the President would soon issue. Nathan M. Woods was added to the committee to assist in recruiting. The treasurer was directed to borrow money, and to pay each volunteer, when properly credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. This system, without material alteration, was continued until the end of the war.

The selectmen reported in 1866 that the town had furnished one hundred and three men for the war, which is full thirty-five less than the number actually furnished and credited to the town, as it filled its full quota upon every call made by the President for volunteers, and at the end of the war had a surplus of ten over and above all demands. It is proper also to state that twenty-five citizens of Swanzey enlisted in Rhode-Island regiments, for whom no credit was given nor allowance made. The whole amount of money appropriated by the town and raised by private subscription, and expended on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was nineteen thousand nine hundred and eighty dollars and fifty-eight cents ($19,980.58).

The whole amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of enlisted men, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $145.76; in 1862, $1,036.80; in 1863, $1,130.08; in 1864, $889.20; in 1865, $800.00. Total amount in four years, $4,001.64.


Taunton

Incorporated as a town Sept. 3, 1639; as a city, May 11, 1864. Population in 1860, 15,376; in 1865, 16,005. Valuation in 1860, $8,211,023; in 1865, $8,463,074.

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Allen Presbrey, Cornelius White, Isaac G. Currier; in 1864, Allen Presbrey, Nathan S. Williams, Abram Briggs. In 1864 a city government was formed, and Edward H. Bennett was chosen mayor.

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Henry C. Porter; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, James M. Cushman. The townurer [159] in 1861 and 1862 was Phillip T. Brewster; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, George A. Washburn.

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon questions relating to the war, was held on the 27th of April, when the town voted to furnish a complete uniform to each soldier who should enlist from Taunton, and should be accepted and mustered into the service of the United States; also, to pay each a bounty of fifteen dollars, ‘and such a sum per month as would make his pay twenty-six dollars a month,’ when added to what was paid by the Government. Samuel L. Crocker, Henry Williams, Thompson Newbury, Lovett Morse, Harrison Tweed, Samuel O. Dunbar, and Le Baron B. Church were chosen a committee to carry these votes into effect. Another town-meeting was held on the 13th of July, and six thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers; and still another meeting was held on the 10th of October, when ten thousand dollars additional were voted for the same purpose.

1862. A town-meeting was held on the 14th of August, at which the town voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars ‘to each volunteer who had enlisted, or who should hereafter enlist, under the pending call of the President for three hundred thousand volunteers for three years service,’ when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. Another meeting was held on the 26th of August, at which the town voted to pay each volunteer for nine months service a bounty of one hundred dollars, who should be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town.

1863. No special action appears to have been necessary by the town in its corporate capacity during this year, either in regard to filling its quotas, or in the payment of State aid to the families of the soldiers, although recruiting went on, bounties were paid, and the families were properly provided for.

1864. At a legal town-meeting held on the 4th of April, it was voted to raise thirty thousand dollars to refund money which had been contributed by private citizens for the purpose of procuring volunteers to fill the quotas of the town, under calls made by the President for men. Another meeting was [160] held on the 9th of April, at which it was voted to pay to each volunteer who enlists in the military service, and is credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars; and this was continued until the end of the war.

By the report made by the city authorities in 1866, it appeared that Taunton furnished fourteen hundred and ninety-three men for the war, which is probably the number furnished for the military service, and does not include those for which it properly received credit in the navy; as at the end of the war Taunton had a surplus of sixty-three men, after having furnished its full quota upon every call made by the President. Fifty-nine were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, not including State aid, was one hundred and sixty thousand eight hundred and forty-one dollars and twenty-three cents ($160,841.23).

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war in the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $10,125.68; in 1862, $28,671.34; in 1863, $34,464.31; in 1864, $29,000.00; in 1865, $15,235.17. Total in four years, $117,496.50.

‘The ladies of Taunton, from the first commencement of the war to the end, were very active in furnishing needful articles to the volunteers, chiefly through the Sanitary Commission.’


Westport

Incorporated July 2, 1787. Population in 1860, 2,767; in 1865, 2,802. Valuation in 1860, $1,803,564; in 1865, $1,453,897.

The selectmen in 1861 were E. P. Brownell, Restcome Macomber, Harvey W. Kirby; in 1862, E. P. Brownell, Restcome Macomber, Thomas Sanford; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, E. P. Brownell, Thomas Sanford, George Lawton.

The town-clerk in 1861 was Israel Allen; in 1862 and 1863, Isaac Howland; in 1864, Israel Allen; in 1865, Albert C. Kirby. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Israel Allen; in 1862 and 1863, Isaac Howland; in 1864, Israel Allen; in 1865, Leonard Macomber. [161]

1861. The first legal action taken by the town of Westport was at a meeting held on the 3d of May. In the town warrant, calling the meeting, were these words: ‘to see what action the town will take in relation to the present national difficulties.’ After due consideration, the town voted ‘to authorize the treasurer to raise money, and the selectmen to enlist men in putting down the Rebellion.’

1862. A special meeting was held on the 18th of July, at which, on motion of E. P. Brownell, it was voted ‘that a committee of five be appointed by the chair, whose duty it shall be to retire from this meeting, for the purpose of considering the call of the Commander-in-chief for volunteers to reinforce the army of the Union, and to recommend such plan as may seem most expedient to insure economical, efficient, and patriotic action, and to report to this meeting as soon as may be.’ The committee was appointed, and reported ‘that it was expedient to offer a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer; that the treasurer be authorized to borrow money to meet the expense; that the selectmen be instructed to offer bounties, and open recruiting-offices; that public meetings be held to stir up the people in relation to the matter.’ The report was accepted. Another meeting was held on the 9th of August, at which it was voted to increase the amount paid for bounty; and the selectmen were instructed ‘to make strenuous exertions to secure the quota, and put the troops into camp.’ At a meeting held on the 22d of August, the following resolutions were presented by E. P. Brownell, and unanimously adopted:—

Resolved, That the present Rebellion, against the purest and best government on earth, is cruel, wicked, barbarous, unjust, and has no parallel in the history of the civilized world.

Resolved, That a wholesome, well-settled government enhances the value of property, renders the hearthstone more sacred, home more genial and happy, adds to the pleasure of society, encourages industry, punishes crime, protects virtue, gives security and peace to the people, and makes life more desirable.

Resolved, That all have a common interest in sustaining the Government, and in crushing the Rebellion, and none of us can consistently [162] say, ‘I am exempt from responsibility in this hour of our country's peril.’

Resolved, That the people of Westport are devoted to the Union, and are loyal to the Government. The soil of rebellious Virginia now holds the bodies of two of her sons as pledges of her devotion, and as tokens of her loyalty.

Resolved, Therefore, that each and every person who shall volunteer as a part of the quota of the town, under the last call of the President for three hundred thousand troops, shall receive the sum of two hundred dollars when he shall be mustered into service, provided he shall, at the time of his enlistment, be a resident of Westport.

Resolved, That the selectmen are hereby authorized and instructed to go beyond the limits of this town for the purpose of securing volunteers, whenever they shall deem it expedient, legitimate, and proper, and upon such terms as they shall deem best.

Resolved, That, provided we are personally compelled to submit to a draft, each person so drafted shall receive the sum of two hundred dollars, which he may use for the benefit of his family, or for the purpose of procuring a substitute.

Resolved, That the town-treasurer is hereby authorized and instructed to borrow money at such time and in such sums as shall be found necessary to meet the bounty promised and actually paid to volunteers by authority of either of the foregoing resolutions.

Resolved, That we remember with the highest respect and gratitude the brave men who have been or who are now in the field, in the service of our country. It may be well said they have borne the burthen and heat of the day. Those having fallen by the way, we mourn their loss, and posterity will know their names; if any have lost their health, they shall have our sympathy, and our children will remember the sacrifice.

Resolved, That Westport shall have no conscriptions; and therefore a draft upon her citizens, in order to meet the second call of the Commander-in-chief for troops, should be avoided at every reasonable sacrifice, as well as by energetic and legitimate action.

1863. Nothing of special interest appears to have been done, ‘in legal town-meeting,’ in regard to the war during this year, although the selectmen continued to recruit volunteers, and to pay State aid to soldiers' families.

1864. At a town-meeting held on the 23d of April, the following resolution was passed:— [163]

Resolved, That we do hereby exonerate our selectmen from the contumely cast upon them by the writer of an article that appears in the ‘Republican Standard’ of Feb. 25, 1864, entitled ‘Recruiting in Westport,’ and still retain the utmost confidence in them as gentlemen of ability and integrity, and hereby tender them our sincere thanks and approbation for their energy and faithfulness in carrying out the instructions (adopted at the various meetings held during the present Rebellion) to procure the requisite number of men required from the town, to answer the several calls of the President of the United States.11

The selectmen in 1866 reported that Westport had furnished two hundred and forty-five men for the war, which evidently did not include men in the navy. Westport probably furnished about two hundred and ninety men, as it filled its quota upon every call made by the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of thirty-two over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer in the military service. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thousand, nine hundred and sixteen dollars and forty cents ($31,916.40).

The whole amount of money raised and expended by the town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $18.00; in 1862, $2,038.00; in 1863, $4,595.58; in 1864, $3,367.44; in 1865, $2,393.74. Total amount in four years, $12,412.76.

1 The arrangement was made; but it was subsequently ascertained that the men so transferred rightly belonged to Acushnet, they having enlisted in the navy from that town.

2 Forty-six of whom died in the service.

3 This large falling off of the valuation during these five years is to be accounted for by the danger to which whaling vessels were exposed during the war, in which business the citizens of Fairhaven were chiefly interested.

4 Lieutenant Bullock belonged to the Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and died June 25, 1862, of wounds received at the battle of Fair Oaks, Va.

5 Colonel Richard Borden has erected a splendid marble monument on this lot, with tablets and military emblems.

6 This great diminution in the valuation was the effect of the war upon the whaling interest.

7 These are believed to have been the first resolutions passed by any municipal body in regard to that terrible event.

8 This large surplus is in a certain degree owing to the act of Congress passed in July, 1864, allowing credits for men serving in the United-States navy.

9 It is proper to state that between these dates a large part of Seekonk was set off to the State of Rhode Island, and the fact that Seekonk, Rehoboth, and one or two other towns bordering on the rich and populous city and county of Providence, R. I., rendered the payment by them of very large bounties a necessity which comparatively few of our other towns felt.

10 See introductory chapter, page 14.

11 We can only guess the character and tone of the article referred to. Mr. Brownell, the chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and who died while this volume was passing through the press, we knew intimately: he was one of the truest and best men in the State.

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