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[306] is for acts of last year, and upon which these officers have already been called to account by the Bureau or the War Department.

I cannot agree with the inspectors altogether as to a complete revolution in the sentiment of the Southern people which insures sufficient protection to the freedmen, when United States officers and freedmen are murdered, and the freedmen abused and mutilated, as is reported by the inspectors themselves.

They say the good feelings of the whites toward the blacks are owing to their interest in securing their labor. This I regard as insufficient security when trusted to absolutely without some other principle, e. g., the guarantee of equal laws. For years slaveholders have deemed compulsory measures the best security for labor.

The inspectors declare that the Bureau has been in the aggregate productive of more harm than good, and give as their reasons, substantially, the reliance upon it of the negroes, and their consequent distrust of the property holders, and the provocation of espionage creating mutual suspicion and bitterness.

I deny the whole statement. It is not founded upon fact, but upon theories constantly put forth by the enemies of good order. A few bad agents have been sent, and have doubtless done much harm, yet this Bureau agency has been mediatorial and pacific as a whole. It has relieved this very suspicion and bitterness that existed when it was first organized. Riots, murders, and wicked deeds have recently sprung up, but these are in no way initiated or caused by the officers of the Government. . ...

The principles that apply to wages induced the present contract system. I would have been glad to

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