previous next
[153] Americans, who certainly enjoy them even more than Europeans, should not contribute their share-beyond the entering sixpence — to keep them up. Both countries were in a manner the losers, for instance, when the magnificent library at Blenheim was sold at auction to pay the debts of a spendthrift. It must always be remembered that individual wealth among Americans is greater in proportion than European wealth, because the latter is almost always encumbered with the necessity of keeping up costly establishments. Much of it, no doubt, will float back to Europe by change of residence or international marriages, and will serve either to keep up great historic places or for much worse purposes. But the problem of human civilization lies behind all this, and will perhaps transform all our notions of property itself within another hundred years.

1896

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
Europe (2)
Blenheim, Va. (Virginia, United States) (1)

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide People (automatically extracted)
Sort people alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a person to search for him/her in this document.
Americans (2)
hide Dates (automatically extracted)
Sort dates alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a date to search for it in this document.
1896 AD (1)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: